The Negro in the American Revolution

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Cosimo, Inc., Jun 1, 2007 - African American soldiers - 400 pages
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A history of African American participation in the Revolution, in the Civil War, and in antislavery uprisings between the two wars.

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Contents

CHAPTER XXIV
177
HONOBS TO THE NOBLE DEAD
186
THE NORTHERN WING OP THE REBELLION
192
CHAPTER XXVIII
212
CHAPTER XXXI
235
INJUSTICE TO COLORED TROOPS
248
CHAPTER XXXIII
255
CHAPTER XXXV
273

CHAPTER XII
82
THE DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA FREE
93
CHAPTER XIV
100
PROCLAMATION OF FREEDOM
109
CHAPTER XVI
124
CHAPTER XVII
130
CHAPTER XVIII
137
BLACKS UNDER FIRE IN SOUTH CAROLINA
159
BATTLE OF PORT HUDSON
167
A THRILLING INCIDENT OP THE
283
CHAPTER XXXVII
291
CHAPTER XXXVIII
298
CHAPTER XL
323
CHAPTER XLII
345
CHAPTER XLTII
355
Slavery the Foundation of Caste Black its Preference The Gen
361
CHAPTER XLV
375
Copyright

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Page 120 - ... that the executive will on the first day of january aforesaid by proclamation designate the states and parts of states if any in which the people thereof respectively shall then be in rebellion against the united states and the fact that any state or the people thereof shall on that day be in good faith represented in the congress of the united states by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such...
Page 121 - ... order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St.
Page 120 - That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free...
Page 20 - I should return to the service of my earthly master, " for he who knoweth his Master's will, and doeth it not, shall be beaten with many stripes, and thus have I chastened you.
Page 121 - West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this Proclamation were not issued.
Page 72 - I further make known that, whether it be competent for me, as Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy, to declare the slaves of any State or States free, and whether, at any time, or in any case, it shall have become a necessity indispensable to the maintenance of the Government to exercise such supposed power, are questions which, under my responsibility, I reserve to myself, and which I can not feel justified in leaving to the decision of commanders in the field.
Page 121 - I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free, and that the executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons.
Page 121 - And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense; and I recommend to them that in all cases when allowed they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. And I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places and to man vessels of all sorts in said service.
Page 120 - Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and...
Page 11 - I knew that you could endure hunger and thirst and all the hardships of war. I knew that you loved the land of your nativity, and that, like ourselves, you had to defend all that is most dear to man. But you surpass my hopes. I have found in you, united to these qualities, that noble enthusiasm which impels to great deeds.

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