Ulysses S. Grant

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G.W. Jacobs, 1915 - 376 pages
 

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Page 365 - The officers to give their individual paroles not to take up arms against the Government of the United States until properly exchanged ; and each company or regimental commander sign a like parole for the men of their commands.
Page 129 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 266 - I felt like anything rather than rejoicing at the downfall of a foe who had fought so long and valiantly and had suffered so much for a cause, though that cause was, I believe, one of the worst for which a people ever fought, and one for which there was the least excuse.
Page 91 - I have no prejudice against the Southern people. They are just what we would be in their situation. If slavery did not now exist among them, they would not introduce it. If it did now exist among us, we should not instantly give it up.
Page 366 - This done, each officer and man will be allowed to return to his home, not to be disturbed by United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside.
Page 363 - General : — I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the terms of your proposition.
Page 33 - But I won't go," I said. He said he thought I would, and I thought so too, if he did.
Page 67 - I give it as my fixed opinion that but for our graduated cadets the war between the United States and Mexico might and probably would have lasted four or five years with, in its first half, more defeats than victories falling to our share ; whereas in less than two campaigns, we conquered a great country and a peace without the loss of a single battle or skirmish.
Page 353 - You are now Washington's legitimate successor, and occupy a position of almost dangerous elevation ; but if you can continue as heretofore to be yourself, simple, honest, and unpretending, you will enjoy through life the respect and love of friends, and the homage of millions...
Page 364 - VI. .April 9, 1865. GENERAL : — I received your note of this morning on the picketline, whither I had come to meet you and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposition of yesterday with reference to the surrender of this army. I now request an interview in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday for that purpose. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, RE LEE, General To LIEUT.-GEN.

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