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RESULT OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES

FROM 7796 to 1856.
Year. Name of Candidate.

Elect'l vote.
John Adams

71
1796
Thomas Jefferson

68
Thomas Jefferson

73
1800
John Adams

64
Thomas Jefferson

162
1804
Charles C. Pinckney

14
James Madison

128
1808
Charles C. Pinckney

45
1812 James Madison

122 De Witt Clinton

89

183
James Monroe -
1816
Rufus King -

34
James Monroe -

218
1820

No opposition but one vote -
Andrew Jacksop*

99

84
John Q. Adams
1824
W. II. Crawford

41
Henry Clay

37
Andrew Jackson

178
1828
John Q. Adams

83
Andrew Jackson

219

49
Henry Clay
1832
John Floyd

11
William Wirt

7 Martin Van Buren

170 William H. Harrison

73 1836 Hugh L. White

26 Willie P. Mangum

11 Daniel Webster

14
William H. Harrison

234
1810
Martin Van Buren

60
James K. Polk

170
1814
Henry Clay

105
1818) Zachary Taylor

163 Lewis Cass

127 Franklin Pierce

254 1852 General Winfield Scott

42 James Buchanan

174 1856 ) John C. Fremont

114

8 No choice by the people ; John Q. Adams elected by the House of Representatives.

Millard Fillmore

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Besu, January 2, 1857,

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York Tribune have contributed about $30,000 for the purpose of securing Kansas to Freedom; and, with the same object in view, other individuals and societies have, from time to time, made large contributions, of which we have failed to keep a memorandum. The legislature of. Vermont has appropriated $20,000; and other free State legislatures are prepared to appropriate millions, if necessary. Free men have determined that Kansas shall be free, and free it soon shall be, and ever so remain. Harmoniously the work proceeds.

Now let us see how slavery has rewarded the poor, ignorant, deluded, and degraded mortals—swaggering lickspittles—who have labored so hard to gain for it “a local habitation and a name" in the disputed territory. One D. B. Atchison, Chairman of the Executive Committee of Border Ruffians, shall tell us all about it. Over date of October 13th, 1856, he says :

“Up to this moment, from all the States except Missouri, we have only received the following sums, and through the following persons : A. W. Jones, Houston, Miss.,

$152 H. D. Clayton, Eufala, Ala., •

500 Capt. Deedrick, South Carolina,

500

$1,152."

On this subject, further comment is unnecessary.

Numerous other contrasts, equally disproportionate, might be drawn between the vigor and munificence of freedom and the impotence and stinginess of slavery. We will, however, in addition to the above, advert to only a

ugle instance. During the latter part of the summer of

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1855, the citizens of the niggervilles of Norfolk and Ports. mouth, in Virginia, were sorely plagued with yellow fever. Many of them fell victims to the disease, and most of those who survived, and who were not too unwell to travel, left their homes, horror-stricken and dejected. To the horror of mankind in general, and to the glory of freemen in par ticular, contributions in money, provisions, clothing, and other valuable supplies, poured in from all parts of the country, for the relief of the sufferers. Portsmouth alone, according to the report of her relief association, received $42,547 in cash from the free States, and only $12,182 in cash from all the slave States, exclusive of Virginia, within whose borders the malady prevailed. Including Virginia, the sum total of all the slave State contributions amounted to only $33,398. Well did the Richmond Examiner remark at the time—"we fear that generosity of Virginians is but a figure of speech.” Slavery ! thy name is shame!

IN CONNECTION with tables 44 and 45 on page 292, it will be well to examine the following statistics of Congressional representation, which we transcribe from Reynold's Political Map of the United States :

UNITED STATES SENATE.

16 free States, with a white population of 13,238,670, have 32 Senators.

15 slave States, with a white population of 6,186,477, have 30 Senators.

So that 413,708 free men of the North enjoy but the same political privileges in the U. S. Senate as is given to 206,215 slave propagandists.

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A contrast quite distinguishable !

That the apologists of slavery cannot excuse the shame and the shabbiness of themselves and their country, as we have frequently heard them attempt to do, by falsely asserting that the North has enjoyed over the South the advantages of priority of settlement, will fully appear from the following table :

FREE STATES.

1614. New-York first settled by the Dutch.
1620. Massachusetts settled by the Puritans.
1623. New Hampshire settled by the Puritans.
1624. New-Jersey settled by the Dutch.
1635. Connecticut settled by the Puritans.
1636. Rhode Island settled by Roger Williams.
1682. Pennsylvania settled by William Penn.
1791. Vermont admitted into the Union.
1802. Ohio admitted into the Union.
1816. Indiana admitted into the Union.

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