Letters on American Slavery: Addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, Merchant at Middlebrook, Augusta County, Va

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Garrison & Knapp, 1833 - Slavery - 118 pages
John Rankin was pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Ripley and Strait-Creek, in Brown County, Ohio. His brother Thomas was a Virginia businessman. Reverend Rankin wrote these thirteen letters "with the desire of aiding and encouraging every effort for the liberation of the enslaved and degraded Africans." He rebuts the canard that blacks are an inferior race: "What people, in similar circumstances, have ever given stronger marks of genius than are exhibited by the enslaved African of the United States?" By 1838 the book had gone through at least five editions, all of which are far more common than this first edition.
 

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In 1822 Ripley, Ohio’s new Presbyterian minister, John Rankin, began writing a series of letters to his brother Thomas. Thomas, like their father, owned slaves and John was trying to convince him that ... Read full review

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Page 84 - By faith he sojourned in the land of promise as in a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise ; for he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker is God.
Page 86 - Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land: and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you to inherit them for a possession ; they shall be your bondmen for ever : but over your brethren the children of Israel, ye shall not rule one over another with rigour.
Page 97 - Behold, the hire of the laborers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of Sabaoth.
Page 103 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page 94 - Let as many servants as are under the yoke count their own masters worthy of all honour, that the name of God and his doctrine be not blasphemed. And they that have believing masters, let them not despise them, because they are brethren ; but rather do them service, because they are faithful and beloved, partakers of the benefit These things teach and exhort.
Page 98 - Servants, obey in all things your masters according to the flesh ; not with eyeservice, as menpleasers ; but in singleness of heart, fearing God...
Page 86 - Both thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that are round about you ; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land : and they shall be your possession.
Page 8 - Look not upon me, because I am black, Because the sun hath looked upon me : My mother's children were angry with me ; They made me the keeper of the vineyards : But mine own vineyard have I not kept.
Page 108 - Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house ? When thou seest the naked, that thou cover him, and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh...
Page 107 - Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master unto thee: he shall dwell with thee, even among you, in that place which he shall choose in one of thy gates, where it liketh him best : thou shalt not oppress him.

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