The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volumes 1-11; Volume 12, Parts 1-3; Volumes 13-16; Volume 17, Parts 1-2; Volume 18; Volume 19, Parts 1-2; Volumes 20-22; Volume 23, Parts 1-2; Volume 24, Parts 1-3; Volume 25, Parts 1-2; Volume 26, Parts 1-2; Volume 27, Parts 1-3; Volume 28, Parts 1-2; Volume 29, Parts 1-2; Volume 30; Volume 31, Parts 1-3; Volume 32, Parts 1-3; Volume 33; Volume 34, Parts 1-4; Volume 35, Parts 1-2; Volume 36, Parts 1-3; Volume 37, Parts 1-2; Volume 38, Parts 1-5; Volume 39, Parts 1-3; Volume 40, Parts 1-3; Volume 41, Parts 1-4; Volume 42, Parts 1-3; Volume 43, Parts 1-2; Volume 44; Volume 45, Parts 1-2; Volume 46, Parts 1-3; Volume 47, Parts 1-3; Volume 48, Parts 1-2; Volume 49, Parts 1-2; Volume 50, Parts 1-2; Volume 51, Parts 1-2; Volumes 52-53; Volume 56; Volumes 58-59; Volume 62; Volume 81; Volume 83; Volumes 101-102; Volumes 118-121; Volumes 124-125

Front Cover
Found also in the House Miscellaneous documents of the 52 to the 56th Congress./ Each number has special index. Inserted in each volume: Additions and corrections ... Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1902./ Series 1,v. 1-53, series 3,v. 1-5, and series 4,v. 1-3 include "Alternate designations of organizations mentioned." /Vol 54-55 of series 1 (serial no. 112-113)"HAVE NOT BEEN PUBLISHED, AND NO MATERIAL FOR THEM IS IN HAND." cf. General Index, p. xi. Series 2,v. 1 (serial no. 114) with imprint 1894, was not issued until 1898./ Edited in the War Records Office, 1880-July 1899; in the Record and Pension Office, July 1899-1901 Robert N. Scott compiled and edited v. 1-18, 1880-87, and also collected the greater part of the material for v. 19-36, 1887-91. After his death in 1887 the work was continued by Henry M. Lazelle, 1887-89, and by a board of publication, 1889-99, consisting of George B. Davis, 1889-97, Leslie J. Perry, 1889-99, Joseph W. Kirkley, 1889-99,and Fred C. Ainsworth, 1898-99; from 1889-1901 edited by Fred C. Ainsworth and Joseph W. Kirkley. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by Cornell University is available from Cornell University's Making of America Web Site.

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Page 46 - I am glad to learn that you are pressing forward reinforcements so vigorously. I shall be in perfect readiness to move forward and take Richmond the moment McCall reaches here and the ground will admit the passage of artillery.
Page 51 - I will do all that a General can do, with the splendid army I have the honor to command, and, if it is destroyed by overwhelming numbers, can at least die with it, and share its fate. But, if the result of the action which will probably occur to-morrow, or within a short time, is a disaster, the responsibility can not be thrown on my shoulders; it must rest where it belongs.
Page 74 - A system of policy thus constitutional and conservative, and pervaded by the influences of Christianity and Freedom, would receive the support of almost all truly loyal men, would deeply impress the rebel masses and all foreign nations, and it might be humbly hoped that it would commend itself to the favor of the Almighty.
Page 74 - Unless the principles governing the future conduct of our struggle shall be made known and approved, the effort to obtain requisite forces will be almost hopeless. A declaration of radical views, especially upon slavery, will rapidly disintegrate our present armies.
Page 27 - York rivers than by a land march. In order, therefore, to increase the strength of the attack upon Richmond at the earliest moment, General McDowell has been ordered to march upon that city by the shortest route. He is ordered, keeping himself always in position to save the capital from all possible attack, so to operate as to put his left wing in communication with your right wing, and you are instructed to cooperate so as to establish this communication as soon as possible by extending your right...
Page 74 - It should not be a war looking to the subjugation of the people of any State, in any event. It should not be at all a war upon population, but against armed forces and political organizations. Neither confiscation of property, political executions of persons, territorial organization of States, or forcible abolition of slavery, should be contemplated for a moment.
Page 61 - In addition to what I have already said, I only wish to say to the President that I think he is wrong in regarding me as ungenerous when I said that my force was too weak. I merely intimated a truth which to-day has been too plainly proved. If, at this instant, I could dispose of ten thousand fresh men, I could gain the victory to-morrow.
Page 74 - The policy of the Government must be supported by concentrations of military power. The national forces should not be dispersed in expeditions, posts of occupation and numerous Armies ; but should be mainly collected into masses and brought to bear upon the Armies of the Confederate States ; those Armies thoroughly defeated, the political structure which they support would soon cease to exist.
Page 51 - The rebel force is stated at 200,000, including Jackson and Beauregard. I shall have to contend against vastly superior odds if these reports be true; but this army will do all in the power of men to hold their position and repulse any attack. "I regret my great inferiority in numbers, but feel that I am in no way responsible for it, as I have not failed to represent repeatedly the necessity of re-enforcements ; that this was the decisive point, and that all the available means of the Government...
Page 69 - At six o'clock the enemy suddenly opened upon Couch and Porter with the whole strength of his artillery, and at once began pushing forward his columns of attack to carry the hill. Brigade after brigade formed under cover of the woods, started at a run to cross the open space and charge our batteries ; but the heavy fire of our guns, with the cool and steady volleys of our infantry, in every case, sent them reeling back to shelter, and covered the ground with their dead and wounded. In several instances...