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GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

ALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE: MONROEC GUTMAN LIBRARY

JUN 1 71957

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PROVIDENCE: COOKE, JACKSON & CO., PRINTERS, EVENING PRESS OFFICE,

16 WEY BOSSET STREET.

18 6 4.

ENTIRELY NEW

SERIES OF

OF READERS,

AND

PRONOUNCING SPELLER,

NOW COMPLETE AND READY !

SEND FOR THE LATEST & BEST BEFORE MAKING A CHANGE.

In consequence of the great success of MR. EPES SARGEANT in his specialty of preparing School Readers, there has been a large demand for new books from him; and he has consequently prepared an entirely new and improved Series of Readers.

The smaller books are beautifully illustrated, and all those improvements which constant consultation with our best teachers has suggested, are included.

Her We defy contradiction in saying that the Series is the Best, the Handsomest, the most Carefully Prepared, and, we may add, the Cheapest, ever published.

Mr. Sargent's long experience, careful scholarship, high culture as a literary man, and acknowledged taste, added to his admitted success in ONE Series of Readers, of which millions are still sold annually, are a guarantee that committees will find it for the interest of schools to examine his New Series before making any change.

p The most striking evidence of his previous success may be found in the extent to which the latest compilers of Readers and Speakers have made use of his original labors in selection; his works appearing to have been

The magazine from which compilers have taken a large proportion of their best pieces.

THE NEW FIFTH READER, Just issued, is the greatest book of its class before the public. The Elocutionary Introduction embraces all the instruction of any practical value; and the Reading Lessons comprise the best elocutionary pieces in the language.

It is eminently a book FOR THE TIMES AND UP WITH THF TIMES — far in advance of any competing work.

SARGENT'S NEW PRONOUNCING SPELLER,

With a New and Improved System of Notation. This work is exciting the greatest interest among Teachers for the thoroughness and ingenuity of its

System of Indicating Pronunciation, and its comprehensive selection of words, its superior graduation and classification, as well as for the neatness of its typography,

SEND FOR A COPY AT ONCE. o School Committees and Teachers desirous of examining Sargent's New Readers and Speller, with a view to introduction, will be furnished gratis on application to the Publisher.

JOHN L. SHOREY, 13 Washington St., Boston.

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That by studying the science of Grammar young pupils are likely to attain the art of using the English language correctly, is a proposition which the experience of almost every teacher directly confutes. The pupil's language is the result of a complexity of influences in which his grammatical study holds a very inferior place. The chief source from which he derives his manner of expression is his associations, more at home, in the street and in the school-yard, than in the school-room. That he will adopt the next slang phrase that goes current throughout Yankeedom is a predetermined fact which the army of pedagogues, with all the artillery of the Syntax, will be powerless to resist.

Grammar, like its kindred sciences, is a fine study for the mature scholar. It is the Anatomy of Speech, as Rhetoric is its Physiology ; but the Hygiene, under the laws of which the children must live even before they know them, is a separate department. How to rear the young in health of language, as well as in health of morals and of body, is a question well worthy of discussion by all who profess an interest in their welfare.

A boy's speech shows his breeding rather than his knowledge. It is one element of the training that he gets at home and among his fellows. As his society is polite or rude, so will his manner of talking be. My forty boys have all had pretty much the same schooling; but in correctness of speech they differ as much as their parents.

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