Arguments in Favor of the Enforcement of the Monroe Doctrine: Contained in His Annual Message, in 1823; and Its Application to Our Sister Republic of Mexico, in 1864

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Printed at the Era Book and Job Office, 1864 - Mexico - 15 pages
 

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Page 11 - This difference proceeds from that which exists in their respective governments. And to the defence of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens, and under which we have enjoyed unexampled felicity, this whole nation is devoted.
Page 10 - With the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the allied powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Page 11 - It is a necessary consequence of this equality, that each nation has a right to govern itself as it may think proper, and no one nation is entitled to dictate a form of government or religion, or a course of interDred Scott v. Sandford. [MB. JUSTICE DANIEL. nal policy, to another.
Page 10 - In the wars of the European powers in matters relating to themselves we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Page 11 - ... greatly they may differ in government, religion, or manners. This perfect equality, and entire independence of all distinct states, is a fundamental principle of public law. It is a necessary consequence of this equality, that each nation has a right to govern itself as it may think proper, and no one nation is entitled to dictate a form of government, or religion, or a course of internal policy, to another.
Page 3 - ... but his speeches were read at the head of the patriot armies, and encouraged them to persevere in their struggle for liberty. At length, in March, 1822, the bill was passed with but one dissenting voice. The president heartily joined in the recognition of their independence, and the following year went so far as to declare in his message that ' the American continents were thenceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power'.
Page 11 - Now, if he had broken the law of nations in respect to them, they would have had a right to punish him, but when they undertook to judge of the...
Page 15 - Wha will be a traitor knave? Wha can fill a coward's grave? Wha s>ae base as be a slave? Let him turn and flee ! Wha for Scotland's King and law Freedom's sword will strongly draw, Freeman stand, or freeman fa'?
Page 14 - States are involved that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, were thenceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European power...
Page 13 - Strike for our altars and our fires, Strike for the green graves of our sires. God and our native laud.

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