Lincoln in the Times: The Life of Abraham Lincoln, as Originally Reported in The New York Times

Front Cover
A unique history of Lincoln's political rise, presidency, and death as reported by the nation's most respected newspaper, with introductions and additional perspectives from two eminent Lincoln historians

The New York Times closely covered the political career and presidency of Abraham Lincoln: his political rise, the early years of his presidency, the Civil War, and his assassination and its aftermath--perhaps our nation's most critical and dramatic presidency. Lincoln in the Times includes coverage of the major events in Lincoln's political life, such as his campaign, his surprising election, and his inaugurals; the State of the Union addresses, the Gettysburg Address, and the Emancipation Proclamation; the assassination and funeral. Edited and with introductions and supporting text by David Herbert Donald and Harold Holzer, the book contains vintage photographs and illustrations of Lincoln and others close to him, in the White House and on the battlefields that he visited.

 

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Contents

Relationship
9
The Rise to Power 18581861
15
The Early War Years 18611862
95
CommanderinChief 18621864
151
The Martyred President 18641865
207
A Nation in Mourning 18651867
289
Lingering Questions
340
Index 403
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

David Herbert Donald has twice won the Pulitzer Prize in biography, and his book Lincoln won the prestigious Lincoln Prize. He is Charles Warren Professor of American History and American Civilization Emeritus at Harvard University. He also is the author of We Are Lincoln Men: Abraham Lincoln and His Friends.

Harold Holzer is cochairman of the 2009 U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and senior vice president at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. He is the author or editor of twenty-three books on Lincoln and the Civil War, most recently Lincoln at Cooper Union, which won a 2005 Lincoln Prize.

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