The Civil War and the Constitution 1859-1865, Vol. 1

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2005 - History - 352 pages
It could be argued that the civil war was the most influential event in the history of the United States. In THE CIVIL WAR AND THE CONSTITUTION, political scientist John W. Burgess explores the politics, people, and sentiments of this time, and closely examines the constitutional issues of the Civil War. Volume 1 of this two-volume work covers anti-slavery sentiment in the South between 1857 and 1860, the presidential election of 1860, the secession of the South, Lincoln's administration, and military campaigns. Burgess also provides personal histories of the three men who were called to lead during this time -- Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, and Stephen Arnold Douglas. JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D., was a professor of political science and constitutional law and dean of the faculty of political science at Columbia University in New York.

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Contents

I
1
II
28
III
45
IV
74
V
138
VI
151
VII
167
VIII
206
IX
226
X
243
XI
276
Copyright

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Page 143 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the government, and to collect the duties and imposts...
Page 144 - The course here indicated will be followed unless current events and experience shall show a modification or change to be proper, and in every case and exigency my best discretion will be exercised, according to circumstances actually existing and with a view and a hope of a peaceful solution of the national troubles and the restoration of fraternal sympathies and affections.
Page 59 - That the new dogma, that the constitution, of its own force, carries slavery into any or all of the territories of the United States...
Page 25 - I do not expect the house to fall — but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other. Either the opponents of slavery, will arrest the further spread of it, and place it where the public mind shall rest in the belief that it is in...
Page 59 - ... it becomes our duty by legislation, whenever such legislation is necessary, to maintain this provision of the Constitution against all attempts to violate it...
Page 60 - That, while providing revenue for the support of the General Government by duties upon imports, sound policy requires such an adjustment of these imposts as to encourage the development of the industrial interests of the whole country ; and we commend that policy of national exchanges which secures to the workingmen liberal wages, to agriculture remunerative prices, to mechanics and manufacturers an adequate reward for their skill, labor, and enterprise, and to the nation commercial prosperity and...
Page 20 - Can the people of a United States Territory, in any lawful way, against the wish of any citizen of the United States, exclude slavery from its limits prior to the formation of a State constitution?
Page 68 - THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...
Page 59 - That the normal condition of all the territory of the United States is that of freedom; that, as our republican fathers, when they had abolished slavery in all our national territory, ordained that "no person should be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law...
Page 143 - Where hostility to the United States in any interior locality shall be so great and universal as to prevent competent resident citizens from holding the Federal offices, there will be no attempt to force obnoxious strangers among the people for that object. While the strict legal right may exist...

About the author (2005)

JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D., was a professor of political science and constitutional law and dean of the faculty of political science at Columbia University in New York.

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