Ethics from a Theocentric Perspective: Theology and ethics

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 1983 - Religion - 345 pages
"Ethics from a Theocentric Perspective will surprise some, shock others, and unleash a flood of speculation about what has happened to James Gustafson. The answer quite simply is nothing has happened to Gustafson except that he has now turned his attention to developing his constructive theological position, and we should all be very glad. . . . In this, the first of two volumes, Gustafson displays his colors as a constructive theologian, and they are indeed brilliant and splendid. . . . Though Gustafson is a theologian who works in the Christian tradition, he reminds us that the God Christians worship is not merely the Christian God. For Gustafson the kind of God who is the object of the theologians's reflection eludes or surpasses the inevitably confessional activity of Christian theological reflection. Thus Gustafson, the constructive theologian, is also Gustafson the revisionist theologian who takes as his task nothing less than challenging the anthropocentrism that he alleges characterizes mainstream Western Christian theology."—Stanley Hauerwas, Journal of Religion
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Preface
x
An Interpretation of Our Circumstances
1
Some Aspects of Our Culture
4
Some Aspects of Religion
17
Religious Studies
27
The Theological Scene
32
Preoccupation with Theological Method
63
Christian Ethics
69
God in Relation to Man and the World
195
I Religion
197
The Use of Terms
198
Nonreligious Experiences and Their Religious Significance
205
Nature
210
History
212
Culture
215
Society
220

Philosophical Ethics
77
Conclusions
83
Theocentric Ethics Is It Ethics in the Traditional Sense?
87
Man or God?
89
A Moral Pause
100
A Religious and Theological Pause
109
Conclusions
113
Convictions and Procedures An Interlude
115
The Priority of Human Experience
116
Religion Others and the Other
130
Theological Tradition and Development
137
Concluding Reflections
151
A Preference for the Reformed Tradition
157
Theology as a Way of Construing the World
159
The Reformed Tradition
164
Problematics in the Reformed Tradition
179
Conclusions
188
The Self
223
The Religious Construal of the Affections and Their Object
226
II God
236
God as Creator
237
God as Sustainer and Governor
239
God as Judge
243
God as Redeemer
248
The Use of Scientific Explanations in the Retrieval and Reconstruction of Theology
252
Man in Relation to God and the World
281
Natural Man
282
The Human Fault
294
The Correction
308
The Christian Religious Context
318
Moral Life in Theocentric Perspective
327
Index
344
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1983)

James M. Gustafson is the Henry R. Luce Professor of Humanities and Comparative Studies at Emory University. His other books include Can Ethics Be Christian? and Protestant and Roman Catholic Ethics, both published by the University of Chicago Press.

Bibliographic information