The Wizard and the Warrior: Leading with Passion and Power

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John Wiley & Sons, Mar 8, 2011 - Business & Economics - 256 pages
The Wizard and the Warrior gives leaders the insight and courage they need to take risks on behalf of values they cherish and the people they guide. Great leaders must act both as wizard, calling on imagination, creativity, meaning, and magic, and as warrior, mobilizing strength, courage, and willingness to fight as necessary to fulfill their mission. Best-selling authors Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal present the defining moments and experiences of exemplary leaders such as Carly Fiorina, Thomas Keller (head chef of French Laundry), David Neeleman (CEO of Jet Blue), Mary Kay Ash, Warren Buffet, Anne Mulcahy, and Abraham Lincoln3⁄4all of whom have wrested with their own inner warrior and wizard. These engaging, realistic case studies are followed by commentaries that will raise questions and suggest possibilities without rushing to resolution or simple answers.

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Contents

Leading with Passion and Power Part II Warrior Roles
25
Leading with Passion and Power Part III The Warrior Path
55
Leading with Passion and Power Part IV Wizard Roles
87
Leading with Passion and Power Part V Wizards at Work
131
Leading with Passion and Power Part VI The Leaders Journey
171
Leading with Passion and Power NOTES
227
Leading with Passion and Power ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
237
Leading with Passion and Power THE AUTHORS
241
Leading with Passion and Power INDEX
243
Copyright

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Page 49 - In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow-countrymen, and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. The government will not assail you. You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors. You have no oath registered in heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it.
Page 49 - Suppose you go to war, you cannot fight always; and when, after much loss on both sides, and no gain on either, you cease fighting, the identical old questions as to terms of intercourse are again upon you.
Page 72 - If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.
Page 63 - Now the general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple ere the battle is fought. The general who loses a battle makes but few calculations beforehand. Thus do many 'calculations lead to victory, and few calculations to defeat: how much more no calculation at all! It is by attention to this point that I can foresee who is likely to win or lose.
Page 218 - Sail forth— steer for the deep waters only, Reckless O soul, exploring, I with thee, and thou with me, For we are bound where mariner has not yet dared to go, And we will risk the ship, ourselves and all.
Page 64 - The first, the supreme, the most far-reaching act of judgment that the statesman and commander have to make is to establish the kind of war on which they are embarking; neither mistaking it for, nor trying to turn it into, something that is alien to its nature.
Page 59 - Whatever you do, you need courage. Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising that tempt you to believe your critics are right.
Page 182 - I came to see, in my time at IBM, that culture isn't just one aspect of the game — it is the game. In the end, an organization is nothing more than the collective capacity of its people to create value. Vision, strategy, marketing, financial management — any management system, in fact — can set you on the right path and can carry you for a while. But no enterprise — whether in business, government, education, health care, or any area of human endeavor — will succeed over the long haul if...
Page 33 - Notwithstanding his occasional illusions of omnipotence, the narcissist depends on others to validate his self-esteem. He cannot live without an admiring audience. His apparent freedom from family ties and institutional constraints does not free him to stand alone or to glory in his individuality. On the contrary, it contributes to his insecurity, which he can overcome only by seeing his "grandiose self" reflected in the attentions of others, or by attaching himself to those who radiate celebrity,...
Page 51 - Senator Douglas is of world wide renown. All the anxious politicians of his party, or who have been of his party for years past, have been looking upon him as certainly, at no distant day, to be the President of the United States. They have seen in his round, jolly, fruitful face, postoffices.

About the author (2011)

Lee G. Bolman holds the Marion Bloch/Missouri Chair in Leadership at the Bloch School of Business and Public Administration at the University of Missouri–Kansas City.

Terrence E. Deal retired as the Irving R. Melbo Clinical Professor of the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education. He now writes and makes wine in San Luis Obispo, California.
Bolman and Deal are the coauthors of the best-selling books Reframing Organizations (now in its third edition) and Leading with Soul (now in its second edition), both from Jossey-Bass.

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