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mark, it contains no small portion between the respective Distances of of fanciful description ; we will not any five points whatever taken in say the author has altogether become Space, to which is added, an Essay a lunatic, but he pretends to a much on the Theory of Transversals, by more political, geographical, and L. N. M. Carnot, &c." This vodomestic knowledge of the moon, lume discovers indefatigable study than many of our politicians, geo- and minute calculation. To the trangraphers, and economists do with scendent a list it may afford amusetheir own mother earth.

ment, but it does not admit of “ Exposition des Operations, &c." abridgment. “ Exposition of the Operations per- “Recherches Arithmetiques, &c." formed in Lapland for the determi- « Arithmetical Inquiries, by M. C. nation of an Arc of the Meridian, F. Gauss, of Brunswick, translated in 1801, 1802, 1803, by Messrs. (into French) by A. C. M. P. Delisle, Osverbom, Svanberg, Holmquist, Professor of Mathematics, &c. 4to. and Palender, the whole drawn up Paris." This work is devoted to by Jons Svanberg, Member of the transcendental rather than elementRoyal Academy of Sciences at Stock- ary arithmetic, and in this view it holm, &c. and published by the is truly valuable, though neither Academy, 8vo. Stockholm." This happily arranged, nor always perspiis a very important.work, and con- cuous. The author, however, proves tains an accurate and scientific ac- himself, in every instance, an adroit count of a mensuration made in and able mathematician; his reLapland, with as great attention to searches are often original, and his exactness, and on principles equally inventions, "if not useful, curious just with those that have been per- and interesting. formed in England and in France. “ Aperçu Général et Raisonné, Of this production Delambre has &c." * General and Scientific View spoken with the highest and most of the Fortifications of Places, comappropriate commendation ; and to posed for Officers of the Line, by thecompiler of it, and the most active the Baron L. de Fages Vaumale." agent in the operations it describes, We cannot give much praise to this the French National Institute has volume; its language is imprecise, decreed the prize of the medal and its general principles do not founded by Lalande.

quadrate with those most approved « Memoire sur la .Relation, &c." by other engineers of the present “ Memoir on the Relation subsisting day.

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and argillvid. Metals are distin- itself, oliveoil, soda, alum, and galls. guished, as usual, into brittle and Chapter four contains minute details ductile. The numerous subdivi- respecting the various manipulations sions are exhibited in a convenient of different parts of the process : sjuloptic table, prefixed to the body and chapter five gives an equally of the treatise.

distinct account of the means by “ L'Art de la Teinture du Coton which the cotton is made to assume en Rouge, &c."" The Art of Dyeing the dye. The operation is divided Cotton Red, by M. J. A. Cháptal, into four stages-the preparation of Member and Treasurer of the Se- the cotton-the application of the nate, &c. 8vo. with four plates, mordants--the application of the Paris." There is no person to whom madder-and the brightening of the the perfection of modern manufac- colour. The mordants employed are tures is more indebted than to the alum and galls, and the colour is indefatigable writer before us; who, brought out by nitrat of tin. with a singular and most fortunate In our survey of the bigber union of talents for science and prace branches of physical philosophy, we tical labour, bas for many years de- shall commence with noticing a Gervoted a large portion of his time to

man work of some consequence, the improvement of almost every art from the pen of M. Schroeter, enthat has any connection with che- titled "- Seleno-Topographische Frage mistry. The general principles of menter and Beomachtunger, &c." dying were first developed by Berg- Seleno-Topographical Fragments man ; the theory was considerably and Observations, with a view to an advanced by Berthollet, to whom exact Description of the Moon, the the work before us is dedicated; and, changes to which she is liable, and if not brought to the highest state of the nature of her atmosphere ; to perfection of which it is capable, is which are subjoined Maps and at least very considerably perfected Drawings. Gottingen, 410, with by M. Chaptal. We may peruse 32 engravings." M. Schroeter is by this book, therefore, with a twofold no means unknown to our own advantage, since it not only presents countrymen, nor is the fame he has us with the ideas of an enlightened acquired amongst us of a vulgar kind. philosopher, but contains the result He is a valuable Fellow of our Royal of an extensive application of them Society, and his paper on the planet to actual practice; for M. Chaptal Vesta, inserted of late in the Transinforms us, that he has for some actions of the Royal Society, cannot time conducted a large dying manu- fail of being known to the scientific factory, in which every individual readers of this excellent journal. process recommended in this volume He has for many years, moreover, has been sanctioned by ample expe- been particularly patronised by his rience. The first two chapters are Britannic Majesty, by whom the introductory, and describe ihe situ- most valuable of the astronomical ation proper for a dyeing establishi instruments, lately at least, in the posment, the arrangements necessary session of the University at Gottinfor its various processes, and the in- gen, were presented gratuitously; struments requisite to be employed. and to whom, in proof of his gratı, The third chapter considers the tude, M. Schroeter has dedicated materials had recourse iv in dyeing the work before us. For the rest, cotton by inadder, viz. the madder together with much accuracy of re

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mark, it contains no small portion between the respective Distances of of fanciful description; we will not any five points whatever taken in say the author has altogether become Space, to which is added, an Essay a lanatic, but be pretends to a much on the Theory of Transversals, by more political, geographical, and L. N. M. Carnot, &c." This vodomestic knowledge of the noon, lume discovers indefatigable study than

many of our politicians, geo- and minute calculation. To the trangraphers, and economists do with scendent a list it may afford amusetheir own mother earth.

ment, but it does not admit of Exposition des Operations, &c." abridgment. “ Exposition of the Operations per- “Recherches Arithmetiques, &c." formed in Lapland for the determi- “ Arithmetical Inquiries, by M. C. nation of an Arc of the Meridian, F. Gauss, of Brunswick, translated in 1801, 1802, 1803, by Messrs. (into French) by A. C. M. P. Delisle, Osverbom, Svanberg, Holmquist, Professor of Mathematics, &c. 4to. and Palender, the whole drawn up Paris." This work is devoted to by Jons Svanberg, Member of the transcendental rather than elementa Royal Academy of Sciences at Stock- ary arithmetic, and in this view it holm, &c. and published by the is truly valuable, though neither Academy, 8vo. Siockholm.” This happily arranged, nor always perspiis a very important work, and con- cuous. The author, however, proves tains an accurate and scientific ac- himself, in every instance, an adroit count of a mensuration made in and able mathematician; his reLapland, with as great attention to searches are often original, and his exactness, and on principles equally inventions, `if not useful, curious just with those that have been per- and interesting. formed in England and in France. Aperçu Général et Raisonné, Of this production Delambre has &c." * General and Scientific View spoken with the highest and most of the Fortifications of Places, comappropriate commendation; and to posed for Officers of the Line, by thecompiler of it, and the most active the Baron L. de Fages Vaumale." agent in the operations it describes, We cannot give much praise to this the French National Institute has volume; its language is imprecise, decreed the prize of the medal and its general principles do not founded by Lalande.

quadrate with those most approved “ Memoire sur la .Relation, &c." by other engineers of the present “ Memoir on the Relation subsisting day.

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agreeable road, which tends only to sagacity, and a degree of goodness reuder, by contrast, the tomb into truly paternal. He resigned the which he descends still more dreary. sceptre to Ferdinand IV, his son, in Yes, I repeat it-the tomb! for this 1759, in order to reign over Spain. residence, although the roof is de- Such is a rapid sketch of the most slroyed, still conveys, by means of signal events that have occurred in its internal structure, a better idea these two states: and they have of the dreary houses of antiquity been regularly traced without the than any other I have yet beheld. omission of a single epoch, with

an The very garden is discovered, and exception to the present alone." The the fish-ponds and their divisions are writer may fairly assume this boast; still visible."

and we have no objection to add, “ Notice Historique sur le Roy. that they bave also been traced with aume des deux Sicilies." “ Histo- spirit and independence, and conric Memoir relative to the Kingdom tain a faithful epitome of the transof the two Sicilies, 8vo." The two actions that distinguish, with so deep Sicilies, from a variety of circum- an interest, the countries before us. stances which will at once present Closely connected with the prethemselves to the reader's recollec- ceding, we are next called upon tiou, have obtained a more than or- to notice a partnership publication dinary degree of attention from the brought forward by M. Jube and literary and political world, within M. Servan, entitled “ Histoire de the range

of the period to which our Guerres des Gaulois et des Français present lucubrations are limited. In en Italie, &c. “ History of the the course of our domestic history, Wars of the Gauls and of the French we have had to notice one or two in Italy, from the earliest accounts publications of no ordinary merit to the present times, 5 vals. 8vo." upon these countries, and the pre- Of these the first volume alone is the sent forms the third submitted to production of M.Jube. It commences our contemplation in the depart with the earliest exploits of the inment of foreign literature. It is habitants of ancient Gaul in Italy, published anonymously, but the and extends to the æra of Louis XI. writer needed not to have suppressed of France. The four ensuing vohis name. The scope undertaken lumes are conducted by General by bim is very extensive; in effect Servan, the friend of the celebrated it commences with the decline of Madam Roland, and do credit to his the Roman empire, and is continued pen. The second and third volume down to the installation of his pre- fill up the interval from the reign of sent majesty Ferdinand IV., upon Louis XII. till the death of Louis whose eventful and unfortunate XV, and close with a general picreign, the bistorian, with a modesty ture of the seventeenth century. not often to be met with in anony. The two last volumes are more inmous writers, chooses to be silent. teresting than any of the preceding, “After having passed in succession, as comprising events contempo(it is thus he concludes his rapid raneous with ourselves, and which sketch,) under the dominion of have made a deep and permanent Charles II. son of Leopold and the impression upon every heart. They Emperor Charles VI., the two contain an authentic history of those Sicilies were conquered in 1734 by campaigns which terminated in the Don Carlos, who governed them with late conquest of Italy, and laid the

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foundation for the enormous power writer has certainly presented us
of the present ruler of France. We with a most simple and intelligible
must necessarily make allowances statement of transactions, purposely
for the impulse under which the dressed up for effect by his prede-
history of these desolating wars cessor, and has in many cases re..
was composed, and the present duced battles to skirmishes, and vic-
manacled state of the Paris press. tories to slight advantages, the result
M. Servan, however, does not ap- moreover of accident or sheer good-
pear altogether in the light of a luck, rather than of heroism or com-
flatterer of Bonaparte, and if we prehensive foresight. He
may credit an assertion in the ceeds in reducing to a far inferior
work before us, he has always been number than has been usually sup-
viewed by him with jealousy: and posed the Austrian forces, and in
on more occasions than one, there angmenting those of the French
appears to have been no small room army; and he deserves the thanks
for jealousy in the bosom of a man of every liberal mind for having
80 devoured with ambition as Na- rescued from obscurity names which
poleon I.

deserve to be held in remembrance,
We have not yet done either with and for having dissipated a variety
Italy, or its modern ravager. The of bombastic and illusory boasts of
Récit Historique de la Campagne, pretenders to heroism.
&c." “ Historic Account of the “Histoire de Campagne, &c.”“His
Campaign of Bonaparte in Italy, tory of the Campaigns of the French
in the years 1796 and 1797, by an Armies in Prusia, Saxony and Poland,
eye-witness,” still claims our atten- during the years 1806 and 1807 ;
tion. The present work, however, preceded by a history of the late war
is of a different character from any with Austria, and followed by short
of the preceding, and for this very accounts (notices) of the marshalls
reason, we feel a particular desire of the Empire, 3 vols. 12mo. Paris.”
to notice it. The name of the eye- These volumes are chiefly compiled
witness we know not; but there from the French official accounts,
is a general air of impartiality and and bear the general stamp of the
fairness in his statement of facts, official language : their tone is bold,
that very much, we confess, preju- glowing, and pointed, when directed
dices us in his favour. We are, at to the partisans of the French em-
the same time, aware that his facts pire, and humiliating and contemp-
do not at all times warrant his con- tuous when describing its enemies.
clusions, and hence feel disposed to Even in the midst of all the parade
make some allowance in the argu. of military virtues and political craft
mentative parts of his work. It is the here exhibited, nothing is more
author's direct object to refute the obvious than that Bonaparte has
accounts contained in a well-known been more indebted to the weakness
work, entitled “ The Campaigns and blunders of his adversaries,
of Bonaparte in Italy, during the than to his own counsels and
years IV. and V. of the French re.

The short biographic public, by a General Officer," which notices of his chief officers, subis here said to disguise and misre- joined to this work, is entertaining, present facts, and to be a monument and may prove useful. of adulation and baseness. In the « Pièces Historique de la Revoprosecution of this object the present lution, &c." “ Historic Sumnjary

prowess.

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