The Finance of Cheap Postage: From Hunt's Merchants' Magazine for Obtober [sic.], 1849

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G.W. Wood, 1849 - Postal rates - 7 pages
 

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Page 9 - ... it is of infinite moment, that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union, to your collective and individual happiness ; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual and immovable attachment to it ; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity...
Page 9 - ... as of the. palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety ; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alientate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.
Page 4 - English system, made in 1848. lie then took the ground, that, considering the vastness of our territory, and the magnitude of our system of mails, and the still greater extent to which they must be carried, three cents here will be a cheaper rate, in comparison to service performed, than in England. If, then, the two systems can sustain themselves in the proportion of three to two, as supposed by Major...
Page 10 - Our post-office army is now made up of a General, three Majors, and 20,000 privates, each one of the latter being in direct correspondence with the Chief. No service can be made effective under an organization so defective and unbusiness like. A district deputy, with a proper force of assistants, would have, in effect, a personal supervision of the whole work. It would involve some additional expense, but at the same time it would greatly simplify the work, and reduce the labor and cost of the general...
Page 8 - First of the dynamics of this mind-machinery of popular opinion, planted in * a little upper room," and opened upon the Legislature of the greatest empire in the world, was the PENNY POST. For the six months' " agitation " of the national mind, which the Peace Congress Committee had originated and conducted, in favor of the measure to be brought forward by Mr. Cobden, the Penny Post had been plied with unremitting activity. Nearly 50,000 letters, and other missiles, in manuscript or lithograph, had...
Page 9 - ... which the press echoed and re-echoed among the populations far and near. Thus, one hundred and fifty assemblies of the people, from Land's End to John O'Groat's, embracing the active minds of as many communities, had thrown into the gathering tide of public opinion the force of their sympathies. And the great meeting in Exeter Hall was to give a great voice to these convictions and sympathies of the people, and to speak to Parliament the last words of the nation in favor of the measure to be...
Page 11 - A member, on learning the number and description of documents allotted to his disposal, would have nothing more to do but to hand to the proper clerk a list of names to whom they should be forwarded, and they would be directed and sent, the whole being weighed at the post-office, and the postage charged to the blouse fund.
Page 5 - The nęt revenue for the year ending October 5th, 1849, is £60,000 above that of last year, a proof that the rate is not too high. The profits which, with good management, cannot fail to accrue, will be well employed in increasing the public accomodation by the mail. Let us now suppose the cheap postage law passed, and that the Department has fully impregnated itself with the ruling idea...
Page 12 - Ireland together, with 11,000,000 of inhabitants, send 57,000,000 ; only 5,000,000 less than the number we have reached in the fourth year of our reduced postage. Does any sensible man, who is acquainted with the working of cheap postage in Great Britain, entertain a doubt that this system is to be adopted here ? Nothing short of it can satisfy the reasonable demands of the peoS'e.

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