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" There can be no liberty where the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or body of magistrates," or, " if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers... "
War Powers Under the Constitution of the United States: Military Arrests ... - Page 569
by William Whiting - 1871 - 695 pages
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The Political Writings of John Dickinson, Esquire: Late President ..., Volume 2

John Dickinson - Constitutional law - 1801
...times of the year, and pursuant to a form and manner pescribed by law. There is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers." " MILITARY men belong to a profession, which may be useful, but is often dangerous." " The enjoyment...
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The Federalist: On the New Constitution

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional history - 1817 - 477 pages
...distinct from both the legislature and executive. — For I agree, that" there "is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the " legislative and executive powers. "t It proves, in the last place that as liberty can have nothing to fear from thejudiciary alone, but...
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The Federalist, on the New Constitution, Written in the Year 1788, by Mr ...

James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional law - 1818 - 671 pages
...distinct from both the legislature and executive. For 1 agree, that " there is no liberty, u if the power of judging be not separated from the " legislative and executive powers."! ^ proves, in the last place, that as liberty can have nothing to fear from the judiciary alone, but...
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Commentaries on the Constitution of the United States: With a ..., Volume 3

Joseph Story - Constitutional history - 1833 - 776 pages
...distinct from both the legislature and executive. — For I agree, that ' there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers.' It proves, in the last place, that as liberty can have nothing to fear from the judiciary alone, but...
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Tracts on law, government, and other political subjects, collected and ed ...

Tracts - 1836
...enact tyrannical laws, or execute them in a tyrannical manner. "Again, there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers. Were it joined with the legislative, there the life and liberty of the subject would be exposed to...
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The Federalist: On the New Constitution, Written in the Year 1788

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional law - 1837 - 500 pages
...legislative and executive powers are united in the "same person, or body of magistrates;" or, " if the power of "judging, be not separated from the legislative and executive " powers," he did not mean that these departments ought to have no partial agency in, or no control over the acts...
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A History of the Late Province of Lower Canada, Parliamentary and ..., Volume 1

Robert Christie - Québec (Province) - 1848
...times of the year, and pursuant to a form and manner prescribed by la\v. Thereis no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers." " Military men belong to a profession which may be useful, but is often dangerous." — The enjoyment...
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Judicial

Levi Woodbury - Law - 1852
...main preservative of the public liberty" (1 Bl. Com. 269) ; that, indeed, "there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers." (Montesquieu, B. 11. Ch. 6.) In other words, that "the union of these two powers is tyranny" (7 Johnson...
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Judicial

Levi Woodbury, Nahum Capen - Law - 1852
...main preservative of the public liberty" (1 Bl. Com. 269); that, indeed, "there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers." (Montesquieu, B. 11. Ch. 6.) In other words, that "the union of these two powers is tyranny" (7 Johnson...
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The Federalist, on the New Constitution: Written in 1788

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional law - 1852 - 496 pages
...legislative and executive powers are united in the same per"son, or body of magistrates;" or, "if the power of judging, be " not separated from the legislative and executive powers," he did not mean that these departments ought to have no partial agency in, or no control over the acts...
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