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Mr. Morrill introduced a bill for "An act to amend chapter 48 of the Revised Statutes, entitled 'Habeas Corpus.""

Which was read a first time.

Mr. Morrill moved a suspension of the rules, that the bill be read a second time, by its title, and demanded the yeas and nays; when, On motion of Mr. Keyes,

The House adjourned until to-morrow at nine o'clock a. M.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1863.

House met, pursuant to adjournment, at nine o'clock A. M.
Prayer by Rev. Mr. Crane.

The Journal was read and approved.

Mr Wescott presented the petition of citizens of Wayne county, praying to be set off and attached to Clay county.

The reading was dispensed with, and the petition

Referred to the committee on counties.

Mr. Howe presented the petition of citizens of Trenton, Bureau county, praying for a change of name of said town of Trenton to that of Baton.

On motion of Mr. Howe,

The reading was dispensed with, and the petition
Referred to the committee on judiciary.

Mr. Lawrence, from the select committee to which was referred the petition of the board of supervisors of Boone county, praying the passage of a law enabling said board of supervisors to levy a special tax to pay off the orders issued to volunteers, and known as the volunteer bounty orders; and also to extend the time for the collection of the taxes to the 15th day of March, next, reported a bill for that purpose. Which was read a first time.

On motion of Mr. Lawrence,

The rules were suspended, and the bill read a second time, by its title.
On motion of Mr. Lawrence,

The rules were further suspended, and the bill read a third time.
And the question being, "Shal! this bill pass?"

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Ordered that the title be as aforesaid, and that the Clerk inform the Senate thereof, and ask their concurrence therein.

Mr. Miller submitted the following resolution, and moved its adoption, demanding the previous question, viz:

WHEREAS it has been the custom to pay some tribute of respect to the great and good of our country, as well as to cherish a glorious memory of great events that have occurred in the history of the Republic: therefore,

Resolved, That, this being the 8th day of January, the anniversary of the battle of New Orleans-the day on which General Jackson performed one of the greatest feats of American valor, and shed luster on American arms-in commemoration of the brilliant epoch in our history, when we adjourn, it be until to-morrow morning at nine o'clock. The yeas and nays being demanded,

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Mr. Fuller submitted the following resolution, and moved its adoption, viz:

Resolved, That we are profoundly convinced of the truth of the declaration of Gen. Jackson, in his farewell address, that "the constitution cannot be maintained, nor the Union preserved, in opposition to public feeling, by the mere exertion of coercive powers of the Government. The foundations must be laid in the affections of the people, in the security it gives to life, liberty and property in every quirter of the country, and in the fraternal attachment which the citizens of the several states bear to one another, as members of one political family, materially contributing to promote the happiness of each other."

Mr. Eastman offered the following substitute, viz:

Resolved, That this House remembers with undying gratitude the patriotism and valor of General Andrew Jackson, displayed at New Orleans, on January 8th, 1815; particularly, in view of the events of the past and the current year, do we remember with pride and encouragement his noble conduct in appropriating the cotton and employing the negroes of New Orleans, especially as, by the appropriation of the cotton bales with which to construct defenses for our soldiers, and by the employment of negroes in the ranks, he recommended and justified, in all cases and at all times, when the country is in danger, the use of every means which God and nature and circumstances have placed in our hands, for the salvation of the nation; and that, in this connection, we gratefully remember, as among the proudest acts of the life of Stephen A. Douglas-whose name Illinois will never cease to honor-that he triumphantly defended, in presence of the assembled wisdom of the nation, at Washington, the act of General Andrew Jackson, sternly resisting the writ of habeas corpus issued by Judge Hall to rescue Louallier from just imprisonment, and promptly sending that disloyal functionary beyond the American lines.

Mr. Shope moved to lay the substitute on the table.
On this question the yeas and nays were demanded, and

It was decided in the affirmative,

Those voting in the affirmative are,

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Yeas...
Nays

Messrs. Sharon,
Sharp,

Shope,

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Smith of Union,
Springer,
Turner,
Walker,
Washburn,
Watkins,
Wenger,
Wescott,

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Dent of LaSalle,
Dent of Putnam,
English,

Epler,

Ford,

Fuller,

Gerrard,

Heard,

Hicks,

Miles,
Miller,

Monroe,

Morrill,
O'Brien,
O'dell,

Patty,

Peffer,

Reid,

Roessler,

Wheat,

Wike,
Williams,

Witt,

Mr. Speaker.

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moved the previous question.

Smith of Whiteside,
Tenny,
Thomas,
Throop,
Underwood,

And the question being, "Shall the main question be now put?" It was decided in the affirmative.

The question then being on the adoption of the resolution, the yeas and nays were demanded, and

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Mr. Eastman submitted the following resolution, and moved its adoption, viz:

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring, That the thanks of this General Assembly are hereby tendered to our able and gallant officers and brave and intrepid soldiers, who participated in the recent battle of Stone River, near Murfreesboro; and that we hold in grateful remembrance their patriotic determination and heroic conduct in that desperate battle, which brought a signal victory to the arms of the Union.

Mr. Burr offered the following amendment, viz:

"And all other soldiers from Illinois now in the field in support of the constitution and Union."

The amendment was accepted, and the resolution, as amended, was then adopted.

Mr. Wenger offered the following resolution, viz:

WHEREAS the Government of the United States has been engaged for nearly two years in an unsuccessful attempt to suppress the Southern rebellion; and whereas our brave soldiers, to the amount of nearly half a million, have lost their lives, either upon the field of battle, or by sickness incident to camp life; and whereas our country is becoming almost a nation of widows and orphans, who, if the President's emancipation proclamation be carried into effect, will become a prey to the lusts of freed negroes who will overrun our country; and whereas it is the duty, as well as the policy, of an intelligent people, after one expedient to restore the Union has failed, to try another: therefore,

Resolved, by the People of the State of Illinois, through our Representatives, That we are in favor of an immediate suspension of hostilities, and recommend the holding of a national convention, for an amicable settlement of our difficulties.

On motion of Mr. Burr,

The resolution was referred to the committe? on federal relations.
Mr. Newport offered the following joint resolution, viz:

Resolved, by the House of Representatives, the Senate concurring herein, That this General Assembly regards the speedy construction of a ship canal, connecting Lake Michigan with the waters of the Mississippi, as a work of the greatest importance to the interests of the Union, and particularly to the interests of the North-west; and that this General Assembly hereby urgently recommend the representatives in Congress from this State, and instructs our senators, by their votes and influence, to urge the immediate passage of the bill now before Congress, for the construction of said canal; and that the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and the President of the Senate, be required to forward copies of this resolution to each of the senators and representatives in Congress from this State.

Which was adopted.

Mr. Walker offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That agriculture would be better sustained, and the commerce of the State increased, by encouraging manufactures; and we believe that such encouragement cannot be better extended, than by exempting from all State and county tax, for a term of years, (say until 1870,) all capital invested in the manufacture of cotton, flax, wool, sorghum, or sugar beet.

Referred to the committee on agriculture.

Mr. Walker offered the following, viz:

WHEREAS many of the citizens of the State of Illinois have been deprived of their liberty by persons acting, or pretending to be acting, under the authority of this State or the United States, and have been forcibly carried beyond the limits of the State, and imprisoned in the military prisons of the United States, when no public charge had

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