Observations on the Writings of Thomas Jefferson: With Particular Reference to the Attack They Contain on the Memory of the Late Gen. Henry Lee ; in a Series of Letters

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C. De Behr, 1832 - United States - 237 pages

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Page 85 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services ; which not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge, to be hereditary.
Page 22 - Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals by law...
Page 139 - On the whole his character was, in its mass, perfect, in nothing bad, in few points indifferent ; and it may truly be said, that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great, and to place him in the same constellation with whatever worthies have merited from man an everlasting remembrance.
Page 12 - ... every act of my administration would be tortured, and the grossest and most insidious misrepresentations of them be made, by giving one side only of a subject, and that, too, in such exaggerated and indecent terms as could scarcely be applied to a Nero, a notorious defaulter, or even to a common pickpocket.
Page 139 - He was incapable of fear, meeting personal dangers with the calmest unconcern. Perhaps the strongest feature in. his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration,, was maturely weighed ; refraining if he saw a doubt, but, when once decided, going through with his purpose, whatever obstacles opposed.
Page 17 - Euboic sea. Others more mild, Retreated in a silent valley, sing With notes angelical to many a harp Their own heroic deeds and hapless fall By doom of battle; and complain that fate Free virtue should enthral to force or chance.
Page 139 - His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, though not so acute as that of a Newton, Bacon, or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgment %vas ever sounder. It was slow in operation, being little aided by invention or imagination, but sure in conclusion.
Page 125 - States be requested to direct a copy of these resolutions to be transmitted to Mrs. Washington, assuring her of the profound respect Congress will ever bear to her person and character, of their condolence on the late afflicting dispensation of Providence, and entreating her assent to the interment of the remains of General George Washington in the manner expressed in the first resolution.
Page 13 - As you have mentioned the subject yourself, it would not be frank, candid, or friendly to conceal, that your conduct has been represented as derogating from that opinion I had conceived you entertained of me...
Page 139 - Hence the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best ; and certainly no General ever planned his battles more judiciously.

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