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PREFACE.

some of the famous battles of the
fannot even find mention in a volume
Vriters intent upon military details
fe the causes of the war, the spirit in
s conducted, the complications that
pe or were avoided by skilful diplo-

CONTENTS.

Trade, 2.-Invention of the Cotton-Gin, 3.—The First Fugi-

tive-Slave Law, 4.—Liberty Laws, 4.--Vesey's Insurrection,

4.-Turner's Insurrection, 5.-Garrison's Liberator, 6.-

Murder of Lovejoy, 6.— The Anti-Slavery Society's Publica-

tions, 7.-Extracts from the Slave Laws, 8.—Helper's Book,

9.-Replies of Southerners, 10.—Garbling the Census, 12.-

The Underground Railroad, 13. The Constitutional

Dilemma, 14.-Attack on Sumner, 15.-The Missouri Com-

promise, 16.–Nullification, 17.—Texas and Oregon, 17.—

The Compromises of 1850, 18.—The Dred-Scott Decision,

19.—The Political Division, 21.-The Struggle in Kansas,

22.—The Golden Circle, 24.—The Secession Crisis, 25.

CHAPTER II.

THE OUTBREAK

- 26

Reliance of the South, 26.-Encouragement from the North,

27.—The Fallacy of Secession, 29.-State Allegiance, 31.-

The Tendency to Centralization, 32.- The Question of Justi-

fication, 33.—The Presidential Election of 1860, 35.-Seces-

sion of the Cotton States, 35.–Formation of the Confed-

eracy, 36.---Bombardment of Fort Sumter, 40,

CHAPTER III.

THE BEGINNING OF BLOODSHED

41

Lincoln's Inaugural Address, 41.-Union Sentiment at the

South, 43.-The Struggle for Virginia, 43.— The Vigintal

Crop, 44.-Dragooned into Secession, 46.-Gov. Letcher's

Treachery, 46,-Farragut's Patriotism, 46.-Secession of

Arkansas and North Carolina, 46.— The First Call for

Troops, 47.- The Uprising at the North, 48.—Map Showing

the Area of the Confederacy, 49.-Action of Prominent Men,

51.-Mob in Baltimore, 52.—The First Bloodshed, 53. -A

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Week of Disasters, 54.-Occupation of Arlington Heights,

55.—Death of Ellsworth, Winthrop, and Greble, 56.

CHAPTER IV.

THE FIRST BATTLE OF BULL RUN

More Troops Called for, 57.-Blockade of Southern Ports, 57.

-Action of Congress, 57.—Confederate Government Re-

moved to Richmond, 58.— The Cry of On to Richmond, 58.

-Concentration at Bull Run, 59.—Spies in Washington, 60.

-McDowell's Army in Motion, 60.–Battle of Blackburn's

Ford, 62.- Johnston Joins Beauregard, 63.-Battle of Bull

Run, 64.—Effect in Europe, 69.—Effect North and South, 70.

CHAPTER V.

BORDER STATES AND FOREIGN RELATIONS

Answers of the Governors, 71.-The Struggle for Missouri,

72.-The Capture of Camp Jackson, 74.--Exertions of Fran-

cis P. Blair, Jr., 74.–Lyon in Command, 75.—Proclamation

of Gov. Jackson, 76.-Action at Booneville, 76.--Action at

Carthage, 77.-Rise of Gen. Sigel, 77.—Death of Gen. Lyon,

78.-The Struggle for Kentucky, 78.- The Struggle for

Maryland, 80.-Secession of North Carolina, 82.—The

Struggle for Tennessee, 83.-Actions in Western Virginia,

84.-Formation of West Virginia, 85.-Capture of Mason

and Slidell, 85.-Hostility in England, 87.–Attitude of

Louis Napoleon, 88.-Friendship of Russia, 89.

CHAPTER VI.

THE FIRST UNION VICTORIES

Confederate Blockade-Runners Built in England, 20.—The

Hatteras Expedition, 92.—The Port Royal Expedition, 94. -

Capture of Hilton Head, 96.- Battle of Paintville, 97.–Battle

of Mill Springs, 98.–Forts Henry and Donelson, 99.–River

Gunboats, 100.—Capture of Fort Henry, 101.- Battle of Fort

Donelson, 103.—Siege of Lexington, 106.—Affairs in Arkan-

sas, 107.-Battle of Pea Ridge, 108.

CHAPTER VII.

CAPTURE OF NEW ORLEANS

Plans for Bombardment, 113.-The Fleet and the Commander,

115.—The Sailing-Orders, 116.—The Bombardment, 117.-

Farragut's Orders, 118.-The Battle with the Forts, 119.-

The Battle with the Fleet, 121.-Destruction of Confederate

Vessels, 122.-Surrender of the City, 123.

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CHAPTER VIII.

THE MONITOR AND THE MERRIMAC

- 127

The Burned Merrimac Raised and Repaired, 127.--Sinking of

the Cumberland, 129.— The Monitor, 130.-Destruction of

both Iron-clads, 131.

CHAPTER IX.

THE CAMPAIGN OF SHILOH

132

Siege of New Madrid, 133.-Bombardment of Island Number

Ten, 134.-Pope's Captures, 135.-Battle of Shiloh, 135.-

Fall of Gen. Johnston, 139.-- The Final Victory, 142.--The

Turning-point of the War, 144.

CHAPTER X.

THE PENINSULA CAMPAIGN

Command Given to McClellan, 147.-His Plans, 148.-Appoint

ment of Secretary Stanton, 150.-On the Peninsula, 152.-

Battle of Williamsburg, 152.-On the Chickahominy,,155.-

The Battle of Fair Oaks, 156.—Effect of the Swamps, 158.-

Lee in Command, 158.-Stuart's Raid, 159:--Nearest

Approach to Richmond, 162.-Action at Beaver Dam

Creek, 163.-Battle of Gaines's Mills, 164._-Battle of

Savage's Station, 166.–Battle of Charles City Cross-Roads,

167.--Battle of Malvern Hill, 169.

CHAPTER XI.

POPE'S CAMPAIGN

173

Formation of the Army of Virginia, 173.-Halleck made

General-in-Chief, 174.McClellan Leaves the Peninsula, 175.

-Battle of Cedar Mountain, 176.-Pope and Lee Manæuvre,

177.-- Battle of Groveton, 179.-The Second Bull Run, 182.

Battle of Chantilly, 183.–The Porter Dispute, 184.

CHAPTER XII.

THE ANTIETAM CAMPAIGN

· 183

Confederate Advance into Maryland, 185.-The Army of the

Potomac sent against them, 187.-Lee's Plans Learned from

a Lost Despatch, 188.-Capture of Harper's Ferry, 189.-

Battle of South Mountain, 189.-- Battle of Antietam, 192.

CHAPTER XIII,

EMANCIPATION

Lincoln's Attitude toward Slavery, 201.-McClellan's Atti-

tude,203. --The Democratic Party's Attitude, 204.- Predic-

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lin, 318.–At Milton, 320.—Morgan's Raid, 321.-Manæu-

vring for Chattanooga, 323.-Battle of Chickamauga, 324.-

National Forces in the West Reorganized, 329.-Battles of

Chattanooga, 330.-The Battle Above the Clouds, 331.-

Capture of Mission Ridge, 333.

CHAPTER XXI.

The BLACK CHAPTER

· 334

Persecutions of Union Men, 335.-The Black Flag, 336.-

The Guerillas, 337.–Secession from Secession, 338.-Riot

in Concord, N, H., 339.-Massacre at Fort Pillow, 340.-

Care of Prisoners, 342.-Andersonville, 343.-Other Prisons,

345.-Suspension of Exchanges, 346.–Violation of Paroles,

347.-Principles relating to Captures, 349.

CHAPTER XXII.

THE SANITARY AND CHRISTIAN COMMISSIONS

351

Women in the War, 356.—'The Sanitary Commission Formed,

352.–The Popular Idea about it, 355.—Work of the Com-

mission, 356.–Sanitary Fairs, 357.- The Christian Commis-

sion, 358.-Volunteer Nurses, 361.

CHAPTER XXIII.

THE OVERLAND CAMPAIGN

- 362

Grant made Lieutenant-General, with Command of All the

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