The War Powers Resolution: Relevant Documents, Correspondence, Reports

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981 - War and emergency powers - 55 pages
 

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Page 11 - Senate to the bill (HR 4961) to make miscellaneous changes in the tax laws, and for other purposes, submit the following joint statement to the House and the Senate in explanation of the effect...
Page 20 - Congress before introducing United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into situation where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and after every such introduction shall consult regularly with the Congress until United States Armed Forces are no longer engaged in hostilities or have been removed from such situations.
Page 18 - To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water; 12 To raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years; 13 To provide and maintain a Navy...
Page 5 - That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate and agree to the same with an amendment as follows: In lieu of the matter proposed to be...
Page 1 - ... shall be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives or the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, as the case may be, and such...
Page 9 - If any provision of this joint resolution or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the joint resolution and the application of such provision to any other person or circumstance shall not be affected thereby.
Page 5 - Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and to the continued use of such forces in hostilities or in such situations.
Page 12 - The constitutional powers of the President as Commander-in-Chief to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, are exercised only pursuant to (1) a declaration of war, (2) specific statutory authorization, or (3) a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.
Page 11 - Forces into hostilities or into situations wherein involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances which authority he would not have had in the absence of this joint resolution.
Page 9 - Forces into hostilities or into such situations and states that it is intended to constitute specific statutory authorization within the meaning of this joint resolution; or (2) from any treaty heretofore or hereafter ratified unless such treaty is implemented by legislation specifically authorizing the introduction of United States Armed Forces...

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