McClellan's Military Career Reviewed and Exposed: The Military Policy of the Administration Set Forth and Vindicated

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Union Congressional Committee, 1864 - Campaign literature - 32 pages
 

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Page 13 - That the force to be left to cover Washington shall be such as to give an entire feeling of security for its safety from menace.
Page 5 - I found no army to command — a mere collection of regiments cowering on the banks of the Potomac, some perfectly raw, others dispirited by the recent defeat.
Page 11 - ... the question at once arises as to the importance of the results gained. I think these results would be confined to the possession of the field of battle, the evacuation of the line of the upper Potomac by the enemy, and the moral effect of the victory ; important results, it is true, but not decisive of the war, nor securing the destruction of the enemy's main army, for he could fall back upon other positions, and fight us again and again, should the condition of his troops permit.
Page 11 - MY DEAR SIR : You and I have distinct and different plans for a movement of the army of the Potomac: yours to be done by the Chesapeake, up the Rappahannock to Urbana, and across land to the terminus of the railroad on the York River; mine to move directly to a point on the railroad southwest of Manassas. " If you will give satisfactory answers to the following questions, I shall gladly yield my plan to yours:—
Page 5 - ... strong and capable of being held by a small force. It was necessary also to create a new army for active operations and to expedite its organization, equipment, and the accumulation of the material of war, and to this not inconsiderable labor all my energies for the next three months were constantly devoted. Time is a necessary element in the creation of armies, and I do not, therefore, think it necessary to more than mention the impatience with which many regarded the delay in the arrival of...
Page 10 - That the 22d day of February, 1862, be the day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces.
Page 18 - ... to my utter surprise, he permitted day after day to elapse without an assault. In a few days, the object of his delay was apparent. In every direction, in front of our lines, through the intervening woods, and along the open fields, earthworks began to appear. Through the energetic action of the government...
Page 13 - That the means of transportation, sufficient for an immediate transfer of the force to its new base can be ready at Washington and Alexandria to move down the Potomac ; and
Page 13 - II. If the foregoing can not be, the army should then be moved against the enemy, behind the Rappahannock, at the earliest possible moment, and the means for reconstructing bridges, repairing railroads...
Page 11 - MY DEAR SIR: — You and I have distinct and different plans for a movement of the Army of the Potomac — yours to be down the Chesapeake, up the Rappahannock to Urbana, and across land to the terminus of the railroad on the York River ; mine to move directly to a point on the railroad southwest of Manassas.

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