Japan's American Interlude

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, 1960 - History - 257 pages
How did the Japanese themselves respond to the American occupation? How were the sweeping reforms—political, social, and economic—of SCAP's program received? How permanent was their effect, and why did some succeed and others fail completely? How successful in the long view was the democratization induced by MacArthur's "artificial revolution"? And what tendencies existing in fundamental Japanese attitudes and history might account for this peculiar success?

The author, Japanese-born and educated in America, a political scientist and journalist, brings his unique experience and knowledge to bear on these questions. The result is a book which tells the story of the American occupation of Japan from the Japanese point of view.
 

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Contents

Attitudes
1
The Character of the Occupation
16
The Background for Democratization
34
The Constitution
51
The Emperor
71
Political Reorganization
91
The Location of Political Power
111
Economic Reforms
133
Labor Agriculture and Economic Recovery
160
The New Basic Education
183
Higher Education and Mass Education
201
Social Change The Process of Democratization
225
Bibliographical Notes
249
Index
255
Copyright

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