Military Expeditions Beyond the Seas, Volume 1

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William Clowes & sons, limited, 1897 - Great Britain
 

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Page 108 - The armament which the Athenians equipped against Syracuse was in every way worthy of the state which formed such projects of universal empire, and it has been truly termed " the noblest that ever yet had been sent forth by a free and civilized commonwealth." The fleet consisted of one hundred and thirty-four war-galleys, with a multitude of storeships. A powerful force of the best heavy-armed infantry that Athens and her allies could furnish was sent on board it, together with a smaller number of...
Page 39 - Napoleon designed (but providentially in vain) for a similar descent upon England. It was not till the approach of the equinox that the wind veered from the north-east to the west, and gave the Normans an opportunity of quitting the weary shores of the Dive. They eagerly embarked, and set sail, but the wind soon freshened to a gale ; and drove them along the French coast to St. Valery, where the greater part of them found shelter ; but many of their vessels were wrecked, and the whole coast of Normandy...
Page 333 - You have saved all your material, all your trains, and all your guns, except a few lost in battle, taking, in return, guns and colors from the enemy.
Page 337 - Load every wagon you have with subsistence, and send them to Savage's station, by way of Bottom's bridge. If you are obliged to abandon White House, burn everything that you cannot get off. You must throw all our supplies up the James river as soon as possible, and accompany them yourself with all your force. It will be of vast importance to establish our depots on James river without delay if we abandon White House. I will keep you advised of every movement so long as the wires work ; after that...
Page 335 - Had General McDowell joined me by water, I could have approached Richmond by the James, and thus avoided the delays and losses incurred in bridging the Chickahominy, and would have had the army massed in one body instead of being necessarily divided by that stream.
Page 320 - I have found out that an Admiral should endeavour to run into an enemy's port immediately after he appears before it; that he should anchor the transport ships and frigates as close as he can to the land; that he should reconnoitre and observe it as quick as possible, and lose no time in getting the troops on shore...
Page 366 - Armies neither fly, nor run post," saith a marshal of France. And I know it to be true, that a fleet of ships may be seen at sunset, and after it, at the Lizard; yet by the next morning they may recover Portland; whereas an army of foot shall not be able to march it in six days.
Page 152 - The backwardness of some of the older officers has in some measure forced the Government to come down so low. I shall do my best, and leave the rest to fortune, as perforce we must when there are not the most commanding abilities. We expect to sail in about three weeks. A London life and little exercise disagrees entirely with me, but the sea still more.
Page 120 - ... was equally clear that those objects ' were to be accomplished by no other means — ' because a peace which should leave Russia in ' possession of the same means of aggression ' would only enable her to recommence the war
Page 131 - ... point of fact this quarrel between Flobert and Thurot was an extreme instance of a cause which, in the last century, and in England more than in France, rendered futile so very many expeditions in which sea and land forces were required to act in conjunction. Of these Vernon's failure at Cartagena in 1741 was perhaps the most marked and the most disastrous ; but there were scores of others ; and the constant recurrence of difficulties seems to point to a radically false system and an honest misunderstanding,...

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