The royal military calendar, containing the services of every general officer in the British army [&c. By J. Philippart].

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Page 235 - And whereas the Senate of the United States have approved of the said arrangement and recommended that it should be carried into effect, the same having also received the sanction of His Royal Highness the Prince Regent, acting in the name and on the behalf of His...
Page 69 - ... the consequences which may follow. Hanover is lost ; England is menaced with invasion ; Ireland is in rebellion ; Europe is at the foot of France. At...
Page 69 - J ask to be allowed to display the best energies of my character; to shed the last drop of my blood in support of your majesty's person, crown, and dignity ; for this is not a war for empire, glory, or dominions, but for existence.
Page 69 - I owe to myself and my family, and above all, the fear of sinking in the estimation of that gallant army, which may be the support of Your Majesty's crown, and my best hope hereafter, command me to persevere, and to assure Your Majesty, with all humility and respect, that, conscious of the justice of my claim, no human power can ever induce me to relinquish it.
Page 68 - I have long made the service my particular study. My chief pretensions were founded on a sense of those advantages which my example might produce to the State, by exciting the loyal energies of the nation, and a knowledge of those expectations which the public had a right to form as to the personal exertions of their princes at a moment like the present.
Page 69 - ... shed the last drop of my blood in support of your Majesty's person, crown, and dignity ; for this is not a war for empire, glory, or dominion, but for existence. In this contest, the lowest and humblest of your Majesty's subjects have been called on...
Page 68 - ... loyal energies of the nation, and a knowledge of those expectations which the public had a right to form as to the personal exertions of their princes at a moment like the present. The more elevated my situation, in so much the efforts of zeal became necessarily greater; and, I confess, that if duty had not been so paramount, a reflection on the splendid achievements of my predecessors would have excited in me the spirit of emulation ; when, however, in addition to such recollections, the nature...
Page 375 - Arms such Arms being first duly exemplified according to the Laws of Arms and recorded in the Heralds Office otherwise the said Royal Licence and Permission to be void and of none effect.
Page 346 - The 49th was then directed to charge the gun posted opposite to ours, but it became necessary, when within a short distance of it, to check the forward movement, in consequence of a charge from their cavalry on the right, lest they should wheel about, and fall upon their rear; but they were received in so gallant...
Page 68 - Majesty and the country, 1 seized the earliest opportunity to express my desire of undertaking the responsibility of a military command. I neither did, nor do, presume on supposed talents as entitling me to such an appointment : I am aware I do not possess the experience of actual warfare, at the same time I cannot regard myself as totally unqualified or deficient in military science, since I have long made the service my particular study. My chief pretensions were founded on a sense of those advantages...

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