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Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers.

417 and 419 MONTGOMERY STREET,

San Francisco, Cal.

Offer for sale the largest and best assorted stock of Books in every department of Literature on the Pacific Coast. We have recently issued a complete Classified Catalogue of School Books at greatly reduced prices. The Catalogne embraces :

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY, ASTRONOMY, BOOK-KEEPING,

BOTANY, CHEMISTRY, COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC,
CRITICISM, DICTIONARIES, DRAWING, ELOCUTION,
FRENCH, GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY, GERMAN,
GRAMMAR, GLOBES, GREEK, GYMNASTICS,
HISTORY, HEBREW, ITALIAN, LATIN,

LOGIC, LITERATURE, MATHEMATICS,
MAPS, MINERALOGY, MYTHOLOGY, OBJECT LESSONS,
PHILOSOPHY, PUNCTUATION, PORTUGUESE, PEN-
MANSHIP, POLITICAL ECONOMY, READERS,
SPELLERS, ETC., RECORDS, SPANISH,

Singing Books, Teacher's Library, Etc.

A full stock of all the Text Books under the above beadings can always be found on our shelves, which we will sell as cheap as the cheapest, allowing a liberal discount to the Trade and those ordering in quantities. Send for our Catalogue which will be forwarded postage free to any address.

Our stock of MISCELLANEOUS Books comprises all important works on every subject connected with

LITERATURE, ART, SCIENCE, Etc.

Almost every work published in the United States can be found in our collection, together with many valuable English publications not reprinted in this country.

The Trade, Teachers, Clergymen, and Libraries supplied at a liberal discount.

Orders from the country respectfully solicited and carefully attended to. We will be happy to purchase on the best terms for parties in the country any thing not in our line without charging any commission.

Remember that all our goods are for sale at the very lowest rates. Wholesale and Retail.

A. ROMAN & CO.

Dec.

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Attention is particularly called to the design of the Combination Desk and Seat, which is tasteful, convenient, cheap, and durable. The stanchions, or end pieces, are iron, to which the wood-work is fastened by screws, making the desk convenient for shipping, as it can readily be put together by any carpenter.

The expense of this desk is but a trifle more than if made with the clumsy wood-ends, while it contains, in a superior degree, all the essential requisites of a good desk and seat. The shape of the end-pieces allows the pupil to get in and out of his seat easily and without noise; and a floor, furnished with these desks, is easily swept.

The desk is durable, strong, and tasteful in appearance.

The standard length of this desk for two pupils, is three feet, 7 inches, and is made of three different sizes, with scats from seventeen inches to thirteen inches high, to accommodate all grades of pupils. No. 1 being the highest ; Nos. 2, 3, and 4, in regular gradation.

In addition there is a back seat, made to correspond with the others, to place in the rear of the room, or to use as recitation seats. The desk is permanently fastened to the floor by means of screws. This desk has already been ordered for several large public school-houses, and gives general satisfaction. IT IS THE BEST AND CHEAPEST DESK MADE IN THE STATE. Address

EASTON & BROTHER,

725 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO.

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Feb.

Rev. ISAAC H. BRAYTON, A.M., PRINCIPAL.

Professor of Rhetoric and Belles-Lettres. FREDERIC M. CAMPBELL, A.M., Associats Principal,

Professor of Natural Philosophy, Book-keeping, etc. HENRY CARVER, A.M.,

Professor of Civil Engineering and Chemistry. Rev. FRANCIS D. HODGSON, A.M.,

Professor of Natural Science and Mathematics. S. S. SANBORN, A.B.,

The Latin and Greek Languages. WILLIAM C. DODGE,

Mathematics and English Branches. G. SCHULTÉ, A.M., (University of Paris.)

The French, Spanish, and German Languages. M. A. LYNDE, A.M.,

Latin and English Studies, and Head of Primary Department. CHARLES L. DES ROCHERS,

Drawing and Painting. E. B. HIGGINS,

Music.

The College School forms the Preparatory Department of the College of Califor. nia, in which students are fitted in regular course for the College, in all the required branches,—up to the standard of this or of any of the Eastern Colleges. A well-proportioned general education is bestowed upon those who do not desire to pursue the full college course. Thorough discipline is required in the English branches. Especial attention is given to Mathematics and the Natural Sciences. Competent preparation is imparted for the professions of Civil Engineering and Surveying. Book-keeping and Penmanship are taught as well as they commonly are in schools exclusively commercial.

The Teachers in this Institution are all professional men, who have occupied prominent positions in the work of education in Colleges or as Principals of Schools and Academies.

The School, with its graded divisions, forms, in connection with the College, a chain of Departments, where, upon a consistent plan, and with steady advancement, students may receive a complete, solid, and finished education. The location is perhaps the best in the State for healthful physical development. The students of twelve years of age and under find a home by themselves at the table and under the care of the gentleman and lady who are their principal instructors. Over all of the students a watchful supervision is exercised. The highest ends and results of education are assiduously sought.

For Circulars and Catalogues, please address Rev. I. H. BRAYTON, Oakland.

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Feb.

By MARCIUS WILLSON and N. A CALKINS. Twenty-two in number.

Colored. Six hundred Illustrations.

II. Accompanying Manual of Instruction in Ob

JECT-LESSONS. By MARCIUS WILLSON.

III. Willson's Series of School and Family Readers.

Adopted by the State Board of Education for use in the Public Scbools of

California.

say or

Notices of the Charts and Manua What Leading Educators

Them. The most extensive and perfect series pub.

Willson's Manual furnishes more sub. lished in this country.-- Mass. Teacher.

stantial aid to teachers in arranging and Will all who read these notices send for filling out a systematic couree of object les. these Charts and use them? If you do, our

sons than any other work that has yet been word for it, you will bless us for pending issued. I expected much from the Charts. these lines.-R. I. Schoolmaster.

but was not prepared for anything so elabWe shall be glad to see these Charts in orate and complete — W. H. Wells, Supi. Put every school-house in the land.- Connecticut lic Instruction, Chicago. School Journal.

1 I highly approve of the design a d execuThe most attractive and beautiful school tion of these Charts and Manual-$ S. charts ever published We are not afraid of Randall, Supt. Pub. Instruction, New York City. praising the Charts and Manual too highly. These Charts, now in use in the Normal Maine Teacher.

School of New Jersey, are already regarded We have seen nothing in the shape of by our primary teachers as a necessity school charts so beautiful and valuable as Wm. F. Phelps, Principal N. J. Sale Norra! these. The Manual is a work of great School. merit - Ohio Educational Monthly.

The demand for means of illustration and A school-room with these twenty-two aids in object teaching is happily met by Charts suspended on the walls is converted these Charts and Manual.-Darid N. Camp, from what is too often a prison of dreari- | Supt, Connecticut Schools. ness to a picture-gallery of childish delights.

I am so well pleased with these Charts Indiana School Journal,

and the Manual that I hall use them conA good work, suited to the times, and stantly in iny own family:- Richard Edwards, very successful in eflecting the object aimed Prin. Illinois State Normal School. at.-- Pennsylvania School Journal.

In the preparation of these Charts and There has been nothing published in the Manual you have done a great and good educational line for years that, to our mind, work for the cause of school and home is such a means of conveying knowledge as education in America.-J. L. Tracy. Assistant these Charts and the Manual that accom- Superintendent of Pub. Instruction of Missouri. pany them.-- lowa Instructor.

I am delighted with the "School and The truest expression of the principles of Family Charts" and the accompanying Pestalozzi that has yet been made. There is ** Manual." I desire to make the Charts the an energy and naturalness in Prof. Will- basis of my talks on Object-Lessons at the son's methods which are wanting in some Educational Conventions which I am holof the foreign works. The Charts and Man- ing:- E. P. Weston, Superintendent of Sckoo's ual promise to introduce a new era in pri.! of Maine. mary and common school education.-New

They are the most complete of any Pr:York Teacher.

mary School Charts I have yet sees.-J. M. The most beautiful American publications Gregory, Supt. Pub. Instruction of Michigan. of the kind we have seen, and the most com- I have shown your “School and Family pletely adapted to the Object" method of Charts" to our Board of Education, and instruction.-Illinois Teacher.

every one is delighted with them. No such We desire, very positively, to commend

charts have ever before been published in Willson's Manual to parents and teachers. Normal School, San Francisco.

any country.- George W. Minns, Principal of It should be in the living room of every family where there are children; it should The “ School and Family Charts" are the be read by every parent, and carefully cheapest and best we have seen. We could studied by every teacher who aims to suc- not well do without them.-J. V. Montgomery, ceed in his or her profession - Chicago Post. Principal Penn. Stale Model School.

Published by HARPER & BROTHERS, Franklin Square, New York.

Eaton's Intellectual Arithmetic. This book, though it has been ready but a few weeks, has been adopted for all the Public Schools of Boston, in place of Warren Colburn's First Lessons, for the whole State of California,

and for many important towns.

Extract from the Preface. The Pestalozzian or Inductive Method of teaching the science of numbers is now universally approved by intelligent teachers. The first attempt in this country to apply this method to Mental Arithmetic resulted in the publication of Colburn's First Lessons, a work whose success has not exceeded its merit. It was, however, a useful experiment rather than a perfect realization of the Inductive system of instruction. That the subsequent books of the same class and purpose have failed to correct its defects, and chus meet the demand it created, in due evidently to their departure from the true theory as developed and exemplified by Pestalozzi.

The Author of this work has endeavored to improve npon all his predecessors, by adhering more closely than even Colburn did to the original method of the great Swiss Educator, and by presenting, at the same time, in a practical and attractive form, such improvements in the application of his principles as have stood the test of enlightened experience.

Extract from the Boston Text Book Committee's Report, June, 1861. Eaton's Intellectual Arithmetic is formed upon the same plan, drawn from the same source, as Colburn's, viz. : from Pestalozzi. It is more gradually progressive than Col. burn, thus avoiding some of the abrupt transitions wbich occur in his work.

The exercives in Abstract Numbers are more broken up, and more largely interspersed with practical questions, and thus the interest of the pupil is a wakened and weariness avoided. In the matter of Detinations, and the Tables of Weights, Measures, and the examples illustrating each, it is an improvement upon Colburn, and the whole subject of per centage is treated in a much more comprehensive manner, and the illustrations and applications more various. The book is better printed and better bound than Colburn ; indeed, just in proportion as one approves of Colburn's First Lessons, he must the more approve of Eaton's Intellectual, which is, in fact, simply Colburn out-Colburned.

From the Rhode Island Schoolmaster. It has all of the jewels of the excellent old Colburn, with the modern improvements beantifully set. It is a triumphant success in the production of a progressive work for young learners.

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Eaton's Complete Series of Standard Arithmetics.

ADAPTED TO THE BEST MODE OF INSTRUCTION. USED IN ALL THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE CITY OF BOSTON.

ADOPTED FOR USE IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA.

I. Eaton's Primary Arithmetic.
II. Eaton's Intellectual Arithmetic.
III. Eaton's Common School Arithmetic.

IV. Eaton's New Treatise on Arithmetic. This Series is distinguished by 1. The thorough and scientific manner in which all the principles are developed

and illustrated. 2. The clearness, precision, and brevity of its rules and definitions. 3. The logical and satisfactory explanations. 4. The prominence of analysis throughout the series. 5. The practical character of each book. 6. The being based upon the inductive and analytical plan, which teaches the

pupil to think and reason. 7. The mechanical style in which the books are manufactured.

Copies of Eaton's Arithmetics mailed to Teachers and Committees for examination on receipt of the prices attixed : Primary, 5 cents ; Intellectual, 10 cents ; Common School and Treatise, 20 cents cach.

TAGGARD & THOMPSON, Publishers,

29 CORNHILL, BOSTON.

Nov.

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