The American Commonwealth -

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., 2007 - History - 624 pages
Volume II covers the party system in American politics. It discusses the pitfalls and benefits of the two-party system that has become entrenched. He describes for those who are unfamiliar with it how American political parties use their power, and explains for the benefit of all how the peculiar American interpretation of political parties came to be. He further delves into the political machine, corruption, and the doling out of favors. Bryce attempts to clarify how Americans, whom he has deemed a generally honorable people, could approve or allow such evils within their system of government without themselves being guilty of corruption and evil. His observations of the American character are deft and may be as informative to Americans themselves as they are to foreign readers. Anyone with an interest in politics or American history will find Bryce's commentary penetratingly insightful. British historian VISCOUNT JAMES BRYCE (1838-1922) attended the University of Glasgow and Trinity College, Oxford. He is best known for his scholarship of the Holy Roman Empire. His popular works include Studies in History and Jurisprudence (1901) and Studies in Contemporary Biography (1903).
 

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Contents

CHAF FASB
3
byi Further Observations om the Parties
39
LXXXIII
51
ltii Tub Politicians
56
Why the Best Meh do mot oo into Pomtjos
69
HOW THE MACHINE WOHKS 07
97
urn Bwgs a Bosb
107
LXIY LOOAB EXTENSION OB RlKOS AKD BogSBS
120
The Nature of Public Opinion
247
government bt fubmo ofwioi
263
Organs of Public Opinion
279
Classes as Influencing Opinion
293
Local Types of OpinionEast West and South
307
The Actio of Public Opinion
317
The Tyranny of the Majority
336
The Fatalism of the Multitude
344

LXY SPOILS
131
lxyh corrottion
154
The Wab against Bossdom
166
uotn Tub Isstws in Presidential Elections
213
LXXin POBTHBB OBSERVATIONS ON NOMINATIONS AMD Elec
220
Type of American Statbsmbn
228
bxxr What the Peoblb Think of it
237
Wherein Public Opinion Pails
355
Wherein Public Opinion Suocbbm
363
lxxxvih The Tammany Ring in New York City
377
xcvni The True Faults of American Democracy 681
594
Europe
607
Copyright

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Page 21 - Neither party has anything definite to say on these issues; neither party has any principles, any distinctive tenets. Both have traditions. Both claim to have tendencies. Both have certainly war cries, organizations, interests, enlisted in their support. But those interests are in the main the interests of getting or keeping the patronage of the government. Tenets and policies, points of political doctrine and points of political practice, have all but vanished.
Page 21 - ... country as seriously involving its welfare? This is what a European is always asking of intelligent Republicans and intelligent Democrats. He is always asking because he never gets an answer. The replies leave him in deeper perplexity.

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