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act of Congress providing for a temporary government for | and inserting the words the Territory of Idaho approved March 3; 1863.*

The report was concurred in-yeas 26, nays 13, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Collamer, Cowan, Davis, Doolittle, Foot, Foster, Harding, Harris, Henderson, Hendricks, Howard, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Morrill, Nesmith, Powell, Ramsey, Saulsbury, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Wade, Wilkinson, Willey-26.

NAYS-Messrs. Anthony, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Pomeroy, Sprague, Sumner, Wilson-13.

May 20-The above report was made by Mr. WEBSTER in the House, and agreed to—yeas 102, Days 26, as follows:

|

And shall within the year next preceding the election have paid a tax, or been assessed with a part of the revenne of the District, county, or cities therein, or been exempt from taxation having taxable estate, and who can read and write with facility, shall enjoy the privileges of an elector.

May 26-Mr. SUMNER moved to amend the bill by adding this proviso:

Provided. That there shall be no exclusion of any person from the registry on account of color.

May 27-Mr. HARLAN moved to amend the amendment by making the word "person" read “persons,” and adding the words—

Who have borne arms in the military service of the United States, and have been honorably discharged therefrom. Which was agreed to-yeas 26, nays 12, as follows:

YKAS-Messrs. James C. Allen, Baily, Beaman, Blaine, Jacob B. Blair, Bliss, Brooks, William G. Brown, Chanler, Coffroth, Cox, Cravens, Creswell, Thomas T. Davis, Dawson, Donnelly, Driggs, Eden, Edgerton, Eldridge, Farusworth, Finck, Grider, Hale, Hall, Harding, Harrington, Charles M. Harris, Herrick, Holmun, Hooper, HotchYEAS -Messrs. Anthony, Chandler, Clark, Collamer kiss, Ashahel W. Hubbard, Hutchins, Ingersoll, Wm. John-Conness, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, son, Kalbfleisch, Kasson, Francis W. Kellogg, Kernan, King, Harlan, Harris, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Lane of Kansas, Law, Lazear, Long, Longyear, Mallory, Marcy, McAllister, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Ten Eyck, MoBride, Mc Dowell, McIndoe, McKinney, Samuel F. Mil- Trumbull, Wade, Willey, Wilson-26. ler, James R. Morris, Morrison, Amos Myers, Nelson, Noble, Norton, Charles O'Neill, John O'Neill, Orth, Pendleton, Perham, Pike, Pomeroy, Pruyn, Radford, S. J. Randall, Wm. H. Randall, Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Ross, Scofield, Scott, Shannon, Sloan, Smith, Emithers, John B. Steele, Wm. G. Steele, Stiles, Strouse, Stuart, Sweat, Thayer. Tracy, Upson, Van Valkenburgh, Voorhees, Ellihu B. Washburne, William B. Washburn, Webster, Whaley, Wheeler, Wilson, Windom, Fernando Wood, Woodbridge, Yeaman-162.

NAYS-Messrs. Alley, Allison, Ames, John D. Baldwin, Boutwell, Ambrose W. Clark, Cobb, Cole, Dawes, Dixon, Eliot, Gooch, Grinnell, Higby, John II. Hubbard, Julian, Kelley, Orlando Kellogg, Loan, Moorhead, Morrill, Price, Edward H. Rollins, Spalding, Stevens, Wilder-26.

IN WASHINGTON CITY.†

1864, May 6-The Senate considered the bill for the registration of voters in the city of Washington, when

Mr. CowAN moved to insert the word "white" in the first section, so as to confine the right of voting to white male citizens.

May 12-Mr. MORRILL moved to amend the amendment by striking out the words

And shall have paid all school taxes and all taxes on personal property properly assessed against him, shall be entitled to vote for mayor, collector, register, members of the board of aldermen and board of common council, and assessor, and for every officer authorized to be elected at any election under any act or acts to which this is amendatory or supplementary.

*This section is as follows:

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That every free white male inhabitant above the age of twenty-one years, who shall have been an actual resident of said Territory at the time of the passage of this act, shall be entitled to vote at the first election, and shall be eligible to any office within the said Territory; but the qualifications of voters, and of holding office, at all subsequent elections, shall be such as shall be prescribed by the Legislative Assembly.

In 1860 a vote was had in the State of New York on a proposition to permit negro suffrage without a property qualification. The result in the city was-yeas 1,610, nays 37.471. In the State-yeas 197,503, nays 337,984. In 1864 a like proposition was defeated-yens 85,406, nays 224,336. In 1862, in August, a vote was had in the State of Illinois, on several propositions relating to negroes and mulattoes, with this result:

For excluding them from the State............ 171,893
Against...
71,306
Against granting them suffrage or right to
office

211,920

For..................................................... ........................................................... 35,649

For the enactment of laws to prohibit them
from going to, or voting in, the State..... 198,938
Against..............................................................
44,414

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Davis, Hendricks, Me Dougall, Powell, Richardson, Saulsbury, Sumner, Van Winkle, Wilkinson-12.

May 28-Mr. SUMNER moved to add these words to the last proviso:

And provided further, That all persons, without distinction of color, who shall, within the year next preceding the election, have paid a tax on any estate, or been as sessed with a part of the revenue of said District, or been read and write with facility, shall enjoy the privilege of an exempt from taxation having taxable estate, and who can elector. But no person now entitled to vote in the said District, continuing to reside therein, shall be disfranchised hereby.

Which was rejected-yeas 8, nays 27, as fol

lows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Clark, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sumner, Wilkinson-8.

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Collamer, Cowan, Davis, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Harris, Hendricks, Hicks, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, McDougall, Morrill, Powell, Saulsbury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey, Wilson-27.

The other proposition of Mr. SUMNER, amended on motion of Mr. HARLAN, was then rejected -yeas 18, nays 20, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sumner, Wilkinson, Wilson-18.

NAYS Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Davis, Grimes, Harris, Hendricks, Hicks, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, McDougall, Morrill, Nesmith, Powell, Richardson, Saulsbury, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey-20.

The bill then passed the Senate, and afterward the House, without amendment.

EXCLUDING COLORED PERSONS FROM CARS.

Third Session, Thirty-Seventh Congress.
IN SENATE.

1863, February 27-Pending a supplement to the charter of the Washington and Alexandria Railroad Company,

Mr. SUMNER offered this proviso to the first

section:

That no person shall be excluded from the cars on account

100,587 of color.

176,271

154,524

Which was agreed to-yeas 19, nays 18, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Arnold, Chandler, Clark, Fessenden, Foot, Grimes, Harris, Howard, King, Lane of Kansas, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, Wilson of Massachusetts-19.

NAYS-Messrs. Anthony, Bayard, Carlile, Cowan, Davis,

Henderson, Hicks, Howe, Kennedy, Lane of Indiana, Latham, McDougall, Powell, Richardson, Saulsbury, Turpie, Willey, Wilson of Missouri-18.

March 2-The House concurred in the amendment without debate, under the previous question.

First Session, Thirty-Eighth Congress.

IN SENATE.

NAYS-Messrs. Alley, Ames, Anderson, Arnold, Ashley, John D. Baldwin, Baxter, Beaman, Blaine, Boutwell, Boyd, Brandegee, Broomall, Ambrose W. Clark, Freeman Clarke, Cobb, Cole, Dawes, Deming, Dixon, Driggs, Eckley, Eliot, Farnsworth, Fenton, Frank, Garfield, Gooch, Higby, Hooper, Hotchkiss, Asahel W. Hubbard, John H. Hubbard, Hulburd, Ingersoll, Julian, Kelley, Orlando Kellogg, Knox, Loan, Longyear, Marvin, McClurg, McIndoe, Samuel F. Miller, Moorhead, Morrill, Daniel Morris, Amos Myers, Leonard Myers, Norton, Charles O'Neill, Orth, Patterson, Perham, Pike, Pomeroy, Price, Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Schenck, Scofield, Shannon, Sloan, William B. Washburn, Williams, Wilder, Wilson, Windom, Woodbridge-76.

1864, February 10-Mr. SUMNER offered the Smithers, Stevens, Thayer, Upson, Ellihu B. Washburne, following:

Resolved, That the Committee on the District of Columbia be directed to consider the expediency of further providing by law against the exclusion of colored persons from the equal enjoyment of all railroad privileges in the District of Columbia

Which was agreed to-yeas 30, nays 10, as follows:

And the bill passed the House and was approved by the President.

IN SENATE.

June 21-On a supplement to the charter of the Washington and Georgetown Railroad ComYEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Clark, Colla-pany, in Committee of the Whole, Mr. SUMNER mer, Conness, Cowan, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Harris, Howard, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Samuer, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson

-30.

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Davis, Harding, Hendricks, Nesmith, Powell, Richardson, Riddle, Saulsbury, Van Winkle-10.

moved to insert:

Provided, That there shall be no exclusion of any person from any car on account of color.

Which was rejected--yeas 14, nays 16, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Clark, CollsConness, Dixon, Foot, Howard, Morgan, Pomeroy, Sumner, Wade, Wilson-14.

February 24-Mr. WILLEY, from the Commit-mer, tee on the District of Columbia, made this report, and the committee were discharged:

The Committee on the District of Columbia, who were required by resolution of the Senate, passed February 8, 1804, "to consider the expediency of further providing by law against the exclusion of colored persons from the equal enjoyment of all railroad privileges in the District of Columbia," have had the matter thus referred to them under consideration, and beg leave to report:

The act entitled "An act to incorporate the Washington and Georgetown Railroad Company," approved May 17, 1862, makes no distinction as to passengers over said road on account of the color of the passenger, and that in the opinion of the committee colored persons are entitled to all the privileges of said road which other persons have, and to all the remedies for any denial or breach of such privileges which belong to any person.

The committee therefore ask to be discharged from the further consideration of the premises.

March 17-The Senate considered the bill to incorporate the Metropolitan Railroad Company, in the District of Columbia, the pending question being an amendment, offered by Mr. SUMNER, to add to the fourteenth section the words:

Provided, That there shall be no regulation excluding any person from any car on account of color.

Which was agreed to-yeas 19, nays 17, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Clark, Conness, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Harlan, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sumner, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson-19.

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Davis, Doolittle, Harding, Harris, Hendricks, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Powell, Riddle, Saulsbury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey-17.

The bill then passed the Senate.

June 19-The House refused to strike out the

proviso last adopted in the Senate-yeas 62, nays 76, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. James C. Allen, William J. Allen, Ancona,
Baily, Augustus C. Baldwin, Blair, Bliss, Brooks, James S.
Brown, William G. Brown, Chanler, Coffroth, Cravens, Daw-

son, Denison, Ellen, Edgerton, Eldridge, Finck, Ganson,
Grider, Griswold, Harding, Charles M. Harris, Holman,
Hutchins, Philip Johnson, William Johnson, Kernan, Knapp,
Law, Lascar, Le Blond, Long, Mallory, Marcy, McDowell,
McKinney, Middleton, Wm. H. Miller, James R. Morris,
Morrison, Nelson, Noble, Pendleton, Perry, Pruyn, Radford,
Samuel J. Randall, J. S. Rollins. Ross, Scott, John B. Steele,
Stiles, Stuart, Thomas, Wadsworth, Ward, Whaley, Wheeler,
Joseph W. White Winfield-62.

NAYS-Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Davis, Foster, Grimes, Hendricks, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Powell, Riddle, Sauls bury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Willey-16.

Same day, in the Senate, Mr. SUMNER renewed the amendment, which was agreed to—yeas 17, nays 16:

YEAS-Messrs. Brown, Clark, Conness, Dixon, Foot, Hale,
Ramsey, Sprague, Sumner, Wade, Wilson-17.
Harlan, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy,

Grimes, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Powell, Riddle, Sards
NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Doolittle, Foster,
bury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Wil-
ley-16.

The bill then passed the Senate-yeas 23, Lane of Indiana, Powell, Riddle, Saulsbury.) nays 8, (Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Hale,

tabled the report of the Committee of ConferJune 29-The bill fell, the House having ence on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on it.

COLORED PERSONS AS WITNESSES. (See App.) Second Session, Thirty-Seventh Congress. IN SENATE.

Pending the confiscation bill, June 28, 1862, Mr. SUMNER moved these words as an addition to the 14th section:

And in all proceedings under this act there shall be no exclusion of any witness on account of color.

Which was rejected—yeas 14, nays 25, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Chandler, Grimes, Harlan, Howard, King, Lane of Kansas, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sumner, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot-14.

mer, Cowan, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Fos NAY-Messrs. Anthony, Browning, Carlile, Clark, Colla

ter, Harris, Henderson, Lane of Indiana, Nesmith, Pearce, Powell, Sherman, Simmons, Stark, Ten Eyck, Willey, Wil son of Missouri, Wright-25.

Pending the consideration of the supplement to the emancipation bill for the District of Columbia,

1862, July 7-Mr. SUMNER moved a new sec tion:

That in all the judicial proceedings in the District of Columbia there shall be no exclusion of any witness on account of color.

Which was adopted-yeas 25, nays 11, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Harris, Howe, King, Lane of Kansas, Morrill, Sherman, Simmons, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, Wilson of Massachusetts-25.

NAYS-Messrs. Browning, Carlile, Cowan, Davis, Henderson, Kennedy, McDougall, Powell, Rice, Willey, Wright-11. The bill then passed-yeas 29, nays 6, (Messrs. Carlile, Davis, Kennedy, Powell, Wilson, of Missouri, Wright.)

July 9-The bill passed the House-yeas 69, Days 36. There was no separate vote on the above proposition. The NAYS were:

NAYS-Messrs. William Allen, Ancona, Baily, Biddle, Jacob B. Blair, Clements, Cobb, Corning, Cox, Crisfield, Dunlap, English, Fouke, Grider, Harding, Knapp, Law, Lazear, Mallory, Maynard, Menzies, Morris, Nugen, Pendle ton, Perry, Richardson, James S. Rollins, Shiel, John B. Steele, William G. Steele, Stiles, Francis Thomas, Voorhees, Ward, Webster, Wood-36.

Pending the consideration in the Senate of the House bill in relation to the competency of witnesses in trials of equity and admiralty, 1862, July 15-Mr SUMNER offered this proviso to the first section:

Provided, That there shall be no exclusion of any witness on account of color.

Which was rejected-yeas 14, nays 23, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Chandler, Grimes, Harlan, Howard, Howe, King, Lane of Kansas, Pomeroy, Rice, Sumner, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, Wilson of Massachusetts-14.

NATS-Messrs. Anthony, Bayard, Browning, Clark, Cowan, Davis, Doolittle, Foster, Hale, Harris, Henderson, Kennedy, Lane of Indiana, Powell, Saulsbury, Sherman, Simmons, Stark, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Willey, Wilson of Missouri, Wright-23.

First Session, Thirty-Eighth Congress. 1864, June 25-Pending the civil appropriation bill, in Committee of the Whole, Mr. SUMNER offered this proviso:

Provided, That in the courts of the United States there shall be no exclusion of any witness on account of color. Mr BUCKALEW moved to add :

Nor in civil actions because he is a party to or interested in the issue tried.

Which was agreed to; and the amendment as amended was agreed to-yeas 22, nays 16, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Clark, Collamer, Conness, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sprague, Sumner, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson-22.

NAYS -Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Cowan, Davis, Harris, Hendricks, Hicks, Johnson, Nesmith, Powell, Richardson, Saulsbury, Sherman, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey-16. The Senate subsequently concurred in this amendment-yeas 29, nays 10, as follows: YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Clark, Conness, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Hale, Harlan, Harris, Howard, Howe, Lane of Indiana, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson

-29.

NATS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Hendricks, Hicks, Nes

The bill passed the Senate-yeas 32, nays 4, mith, Powell, Saulsbury, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey (Messrs. Carlile, Hendricks, Powell, Saulsbury.)

-10.

Before this vote was taken, Mr. SHERMAN said: "It is due to myself to say in explanation that I voted against and opposed this amendment for the sole ground, as I stated, that it ought not to be put upon this bill. That Is my deliberate conviction yet; but as the Senate have by a majority vote decided to put the amendment on the bill in spite of my remonstrances and resistance, I feel bound now to vote according to my conviction on the merits of the proposition."

IN HOUSE.

June 29-The question being on agreeing to the amendment,

Mr. MALLORY moved to add this proviso to the section amended in the Senate:

Provided, That negro testimony shall only be taken in the United States courts in those States the laws of which authorize such testimony.

Which was rejected-yeas 47, nays 66. The amendment of the Senate was then agreed to-yeas 68, nays 48, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Allison, Ames, Arnold, Ashley, Baily, John D. Baldwin, Beaman, Boutwell, Boyd, Broomall, Cobb, Cole, Thomas T. Davis, Dawes, Deming, Dixon, Donnelly, Driggs, Eckley, Eliot, Farnsworth, Fenton, Frank, Garfield, Gooch, Higby, Hooper, Hotchkiss, Hulburd, Ingersoll, Jenckes, Julian, F. W. Kellogg, Orlando Kellogg, Knox, Littlejohn, Loan, Longyear, McBride, McClurg, Moorhead, Morrill, Daniel Morris, Amos Myers, Leonard Myers, Norton, Charles O'Neill, Patterson, Perham, Alexander H. Rice, John H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Schenck, Scofield, Shannon, Sloan, Smithers, Spalding, Stevens, Thayer, Upson, Van Valkenburgh, Ellihu B. Washburne, William B. Washburn, Williams, Wilder, Wilson, Win

dom-68.

NAYS-Messrs. William J. Allen, Ancona, Augustus C. Baldwin, Blair, Bliss, Brooks, William G. Brown, Chanler, Coffroth, Dawson, Denison, Eden, Edgerton, Eldridge, Finck, Harding, Benjamin G. Harris, Charles M. Harris, Herrick, Holman, William Johnson, Knapp, Le Blond, Mallory, Mar cy, James R. Morris, Morrison, Noble, John O'Neill, Pen

dleton, Perry, Samuel J. Randall, Robinson, Ross, John B. Steele, William G. Steele, Stiles, Strouse, Stuart, Thomas, Tracy, Wadsworth, Ward, Webster, Whaley, Wheeler, Chilton A. White, Joseph W. White-48. REPEAL OF LAWS REGULATING THE COASTWISE

SLAVE TRADE.

First Session, Thirty-Eighth Congress. 1864, June 25-Mr. SUMNER offered this additional section, the Senate sitting as in Committee of the Whole, pending the consideration of the civil bill:

And be it further enacted, That sections eight and nine

of the act entitled "An act to prohibit the importation of

slaves into any port or place within the jurisdiction of the United States from and after the 1st day of January, in the year of our Lord 1808," which sections undertake to regu late the coastwise slave trade, are hereby repealed, and the coastwise slave trade prohibited forever.

Which was rejected-yeas 13, nays 20, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Conness, Grimes, Harlan, Howard, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sprague, Sumner, Wade, Wilson-13.

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Clark, Collamer, Cowan, Davis, Harris, Hendricks, Hicks, Howe, Johnson, McDou gall, Nesmith, Powell, Richardson, Riddle, Saulsbury, Sherman, Trumbull, Van Winkle-20.

Same day, in open Senate,

Mr. SUMNER renewed the amendment, which was agreed to-yeas 23, nays 14, as follows:

YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Conness, Dixon, Doolittle,* Fessenden, Foot, Harlan, Harris, Howard, Howe, Lane of Kansas, Morgan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Sprague, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilson-23.

NAYS-Messrs. Buckalew Carlile, Clark, Hendricks, Hicks, Johnson, Lane of Indiana, Nesmith, Powell, Rich ardson, Saulsbury, Sherman, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Willey-14.

June 29-The House agreed to the amendment without a division, after a brief debate.

Before the vote was taken, Mr. DOOLITTLE said: "I voted against this amendment before on the ground that I did not like to vote for such measures on appropria tion 1ills; but two or three others have been put on, and if this is to be legislated upon, as I am in favor of the aboli tion of the coastwise slave trade, I shall vote in the affirmative."

T. W. HIGGINSON'S PARTICIPATION IN THE BURNS Government cannot close its ears to the demand fon havo

made for assistance. I have ordered troops to cross the CASE.

river. They como as your friends and brothers--as enemies 1864, March 14—Mr. Davis offered this res-only to armed rebels, who are preying upon you; your olution :

homes, your families, and your property are safe under our

protection. All your rights shall be religiously respected, Whereas in the history of the attempt to rescue Anthony notwithstanding all that has been said ly the traitors to Burns, a fugitive slave from the State of Virginia, from the induce you to believe our advent among you will be signal. custody of the United States officers in Boston, in 1854, it is ized by an interference with your slaves. Understand one represented, and it is also generally reported, that T. W. thing clearly: not only will we abstain from all such interHigginson, now the colonel of a regiment of negro troops in ference, but we will, on the contrary, with an iron hand the service of the United States, led, or was engaged in, an crush any attempt at insurrection on their part. Now that assault made by a body of men, with force and arms, upon we are in your midst, I call upon you to fly to arms and supthe court-houso in Boston, where the said Anthony Burns port the General Government; sever the connection that was held in the custody of the law and officers of the United binds you to traitors; proclaim to the world that the States, with the intent and purpose of forcibly rescuing him faith and loyalty so long boasted by the Old Dominion are from such custody; and whereas it is represented and gen- still preserved in Western Virginia, and that you remain erally reported that a citizen of the United States, thon hav- true to the stars and stripes. ing the custody of said Burns, was killed and murdered by

G. B. MCCLELLAN, said assailants: Therefore, be it

Major General Commanding. Resolved, That the president of the Senate appoint a committee of three members of the Senate to investigate whether MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT PATTERSON'S PROCLAMAthe said T. W. Migginson had any connection, and if any,

TION. what, with the said attempt to rescue the said Burns, and with the killing and murdering of any person having his

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA. custody, and that said committee have power to send for

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa., June 3, 1861. persons and papers.

To the United States Troops of this Department: March 17-Mr. TRUMBULL mored to table it; The restraint wbich has necessarily lieen imposed upon which was agreed to-yeas 29, nays 10, as fol- you, impatient to overcome those who have raised their lows:

parricidal hands against our country, is about to be re

moved. You wiil soon meet the insurgents. YEAS-Messrs. Anthony, Brown, Chandler, Collamer, Dix- You are not the aggressors. A turbulent faction, mjsled on, Doolittle, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Harding, Har by ambitious rulers, in times of profound peace and national lan, Howard, Howe, Lano of Indiana, Lane of Kansas, Mor prosperity, have occupied your forts and turned the guns gan, Morrill, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Sumner, against you; havo seized your arsenals and armories, and Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Van Winkle, Wilkinson, Willey, Wil | appropriated to themselves Government supplies; have ar800-29.

rested and held as prisoners y or companious marching to Nays-Messrs. Buckalew, Carlile, Conness, Davis, Hen their homes under State pledgo of so urity, and have capdricks, Johnson, AlcDougall, Powell, Riddle, Suulsbury-10. tured vessels and provisions voluntarily assured by State

legislation from molestation, and now seek to perpetuate a

reign of terror over loyal citizens. COLORED SCHOOLS.

They have invaded a loyal tate, and entrenched them. June 8- The House passed a bill to provide selves within its boundaries in defiance of its constituted for the public instruction of youth in Washing- You are going on American soil to sustain the civil power, ton city, with an amendment providing for to relieve the oppressed, and to retake that which is un. separate schools for the colored children, by

lawfully held.

You must bear in mind you are going for the good of the setting apart such a proportion of the entire whole country, and that, while it is your duty to punish school fund as the number of colored children edition, you must protect the loyal, and, should the occur between the ages of six and seventeen bear to sion offer, at once suppress servile insurrection. the whole number of children in the District. a happy people will reward you.

Success will crown your efforts; a grateful country and The bill, with amendments, passed both Houses By order of MAJOR GENERAL PATTERSON : without a division.

F. J. PORTER, Asst. Adj. General

SECRETARY CAMERON'S LETTER TO GEN. BUTLER. Military Reports, Orders, and Proc

WASHINGTON, May 30, 1861. lamations.

SIR: Your action in respect to the negroes who came

within your lines from the service of the rebels is approved. MAJOR GENERAL M'CLELLAN'S PROCLAMATION IN The Department is sensible of the embarrassments which

must surround officers conducting military operations in a WESTERN VIRGINIA.

State by the laws of which slavery is sanctioned. The Gore HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF Outo, ernment cannot recognize the rejection by any State of the

CINCINNATI, May 26, 1861. Federal obligations, nor can it refuse the performance of To the Union men of Western Virginia :

the Federal obligations resting upon itself. Among these VIRGINIANS: The General Government has long enough than that of suppressing and dispersing armed combina

Federal obligations, however, none can bo moro importaut endured the machinations of a few factious rebels in your midst. Armed traitors have in vain endeavored to deter tions formed for the purpose of overthrowing its whole you from expressing your loyalty at the polls. Having mit no interference by the persons under your coinmaud

constitutional authority. While, therefore, you will per failed in this infamous attempt to deprive you of the exercise of your dearest rights, they now seek to inaugurato a

with the relations of persons held to service under the laws reign of terror, and thus force you to yield to their schemes of any State, you will, on the other hand, so long as any State and submit to the yoke of the traitorous conspiracy digni- the control of such armed combinations, refrain from sur.

within which your military operations are conducted is under fied by the name of the Southern Confederacy. They are destroying the property of citizens of your State and ruin- rendering to alleged musters any persons who may conie ing your magnificent railways.

within your lines. You will employ' such persons in the The General Government has heretofore carefully ab

services to which they may bo bost adapted, keeping an ac stained from sending troops across the Ohio, or even from

count of the labor by them performed, of the value of it, posting them aldng its banks, although frequently urged and the expenses of their maintenance. The question of by many of your prominent citizens to do so. It determ their final disposition will be reserved for future deter ined to wait the result of the State election, desirous that

mination.

SIMON CAMEROX. no ohe might be able to say that the slightest effort had been made from this side to influenoe the free expression of your

Secretary of War. opinions, although the many agencies brought to bear upon

To Major General BUTLER. you by the rebels were well known. You have now shown, under the most adverse circumstances, that the great mass

MAJOR GENERAL BUTLER TO LIEUTENANT GENERAL SCOTT. of the people of Western Virginia are true and loyal to that

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA, beneficent Government under which we and our fathers

May 27, 1861 lived so long

Since I wrote my last despatch the question in As soon as the result of the election was known the trai- regard to slave property is becoming one of very serious tors commenced their work of destruction. The General magnitudo. The inhabitants of Virginia are using their

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Under these circumstances it seems quite clear that the substantial rights of loyal masters will be best protected by receiving such fugitives, as well as fugitives from disloyal masters, into the service of the United States, and employing them under such organizations and in such occupations as circumstances may suggest or require. Of course a record should be kept showing the name and description of the fugitives, the name and the character, as loyal or disloyal, of the master, and such facts as may be necessary to a correct understanding of the circumstances of each caso after tranquillity shall have been restored. Upon the retur of peace, Congress will, doubtless, properly provide for all the persons thus received into the service of the Union, an for just compensation to loyal masters. In this way ov, it would seem, can the duty and safety of the Governm-nt and the just rights of all be fully reconciled and harnized.

negrees in the batteries, and are preparing to send the wo-
men and children south. The escapes from them are very
numerous, and a quad has come in this morning to my
pickets bringing their women and children. Of course
these cannot be dealt with upon the theory on which I de-
signed to treat the services of able-bodied men and women
who might come within my lines, and of which I gave you
a detailed account in my last despatch. I am in the ut-
most doubt what to do with this species of property. Up
to this time I have had come within my lines men and wo
men with their children, entire families, each family be-
longing to the same owner. I have, therefore, determined
to employ, as I can do very profitably, the able-bodied per-
sons in the party, issuing proper food for the support of
all, and charging against their services the expense of care
and sustenance of the non-laborers, keeping a strict and ac-
curate account as well of the services as of the expendim
ture, having the worth of the services and the cost of the
expenditure determined by a board of survey, to be here-
after detailed. I know of no other manner in which to
dispose of this subject and the questions connected there-
with. As a matter of property to the insurgents, it will
be of very great moment, the number that I now have
amounting. as I am informed, to what, in good times,
would be of the value of sixty thousand dollars. Twelve
of these negroes, I am informed, have escaped from the
batteries on Sewall's Point, which, this morning, fired
upon my expedition as it passed by out of range. As a
means of offence therefore in the enemy's hands, these
negroes, when able-bodied, are of the last importance
Without them the batteries could not have been erected,
at least for many weeks. As a military question, it would
seem to be a measure of necessity to deprive their masters
of their services. How can this be done? As a political
question and a question of humanity, can I receive the
services of a father and mother, and not take the children?
Of the humanitarian aspect I have no doubt. Of the po
litical one I have no right to judge. I therefore submit
all this to your better judgment, and as the questions have
a political aspect, I have ventured, and I trust I am not
wrong in so doing, to duplicate the parts of my despatch
relating to this subject, and forward them to the Secretary
of War.

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Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
B. F. BUTLER.

Lieutenant General SCOTT.

SECRETARY CAMERON'S REPLY TO GEN. BUTLER.
WASHINGTON, August 8, 1861.

You will therefore consider yourself as instructed to goven your future action, in respect to fugitives from service, the principles herein stated, and will report from time t time, and at least twice in each month, your action in e promises to this Department. You will, however, neither authorize nor permit any interference, by the troops under your command, with the servants of peaceful citizens in house or field; nor will you, in any way, encourage such servants to leave the lawful service of their masters; nor will you, except in cases where the public safety may seem to require, prevent the voluntary return of any fugitive, to the service from which he may have escaped.

I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War. Maj. Gen. B. F. BUTLER, Commanding Department of Vir ginia, Fortress Monroe.

CONCERNING FUGITIVE SLAVES.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON,
WASHINGTON, July 17, 1861.

[General Orders No 33.]

Fugitive slaves will, under no pretext whatever, be permitted to reside or be in any way harbored in the quarters and camps of the troops serving in this Department. Neither will such slaves be allowed to accompany troops on the march.

Commanders of troops will be held responsible for a strict observance of this order.

By command of Brigadier General Mansfield:

THEO. TALBOT, Assistant Adjutant General. GENERAL: The important question of the proper disposiComplaint having been made that slaves were tion to be made of fugitives from service in States in insur-abducted by soldiers going North on the cars, rection against the Federal Government, to which you have the following order was issued: again directed my attention in your letter of July 30, has received my most attentive consideration.

It is the desire of the President that all existing rights, in all the States, be fully respected and maintained. The war now prosecuted on the part of the Federal Government is a war for the Union, and for the preservation of all constitutional rights of States, and the citizens of the States, in the Union. Hence no question can arise as to fugitives from service within the States and Territories in which the authority of the Union is fully acknowledged. The ordinary forms of judicial proceeding, which must be respected by military and civil authorities alike, will suffice for the enforcement of all legal claims. But in States wholly or partially under insurrectionary control, where the laws of the United States are so far opposed and resisted that they cannot be effectually enforced, it is obvious that rights dependent on the execution of those laws must, temporarily, fail; and it is equally obvious that rights dependent on the laws of the States within which military operations are conducted must be necessarily subordinated to the military exigencies created by the insurrection, if not wholly forfeited by the treasonable conduct of parties claiming them. To this general rule rights to services can form no exception.

HEADQUARTERS CITY GUARD,
WASHINGTON, August 10, 1861.

To Captain H. DAVIDSON,

Commanding Guard at Railroad Depot: SIR: It is directed by the Provost Marshal that you permit no soldiers to leave this city by the railroad who are unable to show that they have been properly discharged from the service of the United States; also, that no negroes, without sufficient evidence of their being free or of their right to travel, are permitted to leave the city upon the cars. I am, Captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. W. AVERELL, A. A. A. G. EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION OF GEN. FREMONT.* HEADQUARTERS OF THE WESTern Department, ST. LOUIS, August 31, 1861. Circumstances in my judgment, of sufficient urgency, render it necessary that the commanding general of this *This Retaliatory Proclamation was issued by a rebel officer: HEADQUARTERS FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT M. S. G. CAMP HUNTER, September 2, 1861. To all whom it may concern: Whereas Major General John C. Fremont, commanding the minions of Abraham Lincoln in the State of Missouri, has seen fit to declare martial law throughout the whole State, and has threatened to shoot any citizen soldier found in arms within certain limits; also, to confiscate the prop A more difficult question is presented in respect to per-erty and free the negroes belonging to the members of the sons escaping from the service of loyal masters. It is quite Missouri State Guard: apparent that the laws of the State, under which only the services of such fugitiues can be claimed, must needs be wholly, or almost wholly, suspended, as to remedies, by the insurrection and the military measures necessitated by it. And it is equally apparent that the substitution of military fcr judicial measures for the enforcement of such claims must be attended by great inconveni nces, embarrassments, and injuries.

The act of Congress approved August 6, 1861, declares that if persons held to service shall be employed in hostility to the United States, the right to their services shall be forfeited, and such persons shall be discharged therefrom. It follows of necessity that no claim can be recognized by the military authorities of the Union to the services of such persons when fugitives.

Therefore, know ye that I, M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier General of the first military district of Missouri, having not only the military authority of Brigadier General, but certain police powers granted by Acting Governor Thomas C. Reynolds, and confirmed afterwards by Governor Jackson, do most solemnly promise that for every member of the Missouri State Guard or soldier of our allies, the armies of the Confederate States, who shall be put to death in pursu

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