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thoughts from her mind; but I would not have you understand that such thoughts distress me.'

“On the early part of the night, after the family had retired, as I was standing alone by the side of his bed, I heard him exclaim, fixing his eyes upwards, All my confidence is in God'—and soon after, 'I fear I shall be left to dishonor God.' At another time, taking my hand, and holding it in his a few minutes, he said, 'Oh, if my spirit had no stronger support than your frail hand !' subsequent time, alluding to his sickness, I spoke of the additional trial of being sick away from home, and comparatively among strangers. 'I was just going to say,' said he, that if this is to be my last sickness, I am sorry to leave such unpleasant associations in your

mind nected with me.' Being at a loss, I inquired what he

' meant. Such distortions,' was his reply.

“ Between one and two in the morning, he was seized with a spasm, which continued with more or less violence for nearly three quarters of an hour, accompanied with a total aberration of mind, in which he discovered great mental, as well as bodily distress.

When the spasm passed off, he became composed, and Mr. H. and Mrs. E. retired, and his nurse lay down in the room, when he spoke to me, and on my going to the bed, asked me to sit down by him. After a few minutes, he said, 'I feel as if I was in a new world. I am perfectly easy and free from pain. It is exceedingly refreshing. My reason is now as clear as ever, and I can hardly realize that I am sick, but by recollecting those painful struggles.' I asked him if he was then conscious of the sufferings he had undergone. He said, 'No; though I am conscious of suffering, I am not aware of the extent of it.' I asked him if he was aware of what he said or did, during his paroxysms. He said, “No;' and soon asked, “Do I do or say any thing that will dishonor God?' [It is evident that he must

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have known much of what transpired, because he alluded to his struggles, and the distortions of his countenance.] He also said of the painful imaginations which distressed him, “They seem to be the temptations of the great adversary'—and added, “Our Saviour was made perfect through suffering. He said that when his eyes were open, he had none of those nervous agitations; but the moment they were shut, his mind began to wander, accompanied by those terrible spasms, and asked whether I thought he had better keep awake, or not. I told him that he very much needed quiet sleep, and wished he would try to obtain it, and I hoped those spasms would not return. “Very well,' said he, 'I will do as you say ;' and asked me if I would sit by him. I took his hand, and he fell into a drowsiness, which lasted, however, but a few minutes. During the above period, he said to me, Such hopes of heaven, and such fears of hell, in one night!' (alluding, in the last remark, to his mental distress when in spasms.) At another time, asked if tomorrow was the Sabbath. I told him we had already entered upon the Sabbath. "The day,' said he, 'on which Jesus rose.' Towards morning, after sitting awhile by the fire, I returned to the bed, and taking his hand, he said to me, 'If we, frail creatures, 'could only have a text of Scripture in our mind, during periods of insanity, it would help us to resist Satan.' I said, “Get thee behind me, Satan.' He replied, 'Yes; and of those that are given to Christ, not one shall be lost.' About six o'clock another paroxysm commenced, which did not subside until half an hour previous to his death, when he was wholly exhausted, and being raised upon his pillows, remained perfectly quiet, with his eyes half closed, until he ceased to breathe."

Another kind friend says, that it was most interesting to see the influence of religion over his mind

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during the derangement caused by his spasms. At those periods, he was harassed with the apprehension that he was eternally lost; but he would say, 'Elias Cornelius lost ! Elias Cornelius a spectacle to God, to angels, and to men ! The Lord reigns; let the earth rejoice!' After the last spasm ceased, and he was placed upon pillows, Mr. H. E. sung two verses of Jesus, lover of my soul.' Dr. H. then prayed. Mrs. H. and Mrs. E. watched him attentively during the prayer. When Dr. H. used the expression, 'Receive the departing spirit of thy servant, now going to the reward of his labors,' he evidently made an effort to move his lips and his hands; and both Mrs. H. and E. understood him to be making an effort to disclaim the idea of a reward. When Dr. H. prayed that his absent wife might be supported under the trial, he made another effort to move his lips and raise his hands; thus showing that he understood and joined in the petition. At the close of the prayer, he expired.

The funeral services were performed on the Wednesday following, in the Centre church in Hartford. A large concourse of people, including many of the neighboring clergymen, were present. An appropriate and interesting sermon was delivered by the Rev. Dr. Hawes, founded on the passage, John xvii. 24, “ Father, I will, that they also whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am, that they may behold my glory.”

The remains of Mr. Cornelius were interred in the north burying-ground, near the graves of the Rev. Dr. Strong, and the Rev. Carlos Wilcox, former ministers of Hartford. A fine monument has been erected over his grave. It is a pedestal, surmounted by a spire and urn, of the purest white marble. The inscriptions on the four pannels are as follows:

360

MEMOIR OF CORNELIUS.

On the east side: “Erected to the Memory of Rev. Elias Cornelius, by the young men of Hartford.”

North side: “Born at Somers, N. Y. July 31, 1794.Died at Hartford, Conn. February 12, 1832."

South side: “In social and domestic relations, amiable, generous, and exemplary. In offices of public trust, wise, ardent, laborious and faithful. His object the good of mankind, his motive the love of Christ, his reliance the grace of God, EVEN UNTO DEATH. His name is interwoven with the history of Christian benevolence in America; affectionately cherished by his friends; and indelibly engraven on every heart in his domestic circle.”

West side: “Graduated at Yale College, 1813. Agent for the promotion of Missions among the American Indians, 1816. Pastor of the Tabernacle church, in Salem, Massachusetts, 1819. Secretary of the American Education Society, 1826. Corresponding Secretary of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 1831."

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