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have delegated the administration of the law becomes for the time being part and parcel of the Government. It cannot be assailed without attacking the Constitution. The man who, under the conceded right to criticize the acts of the Government, assumes the right first to abuse it, and then to embarrass its operations, by bringing its character under reproach and destroying its influence, and, finally, opposes or incites others to oppose its decrees, becomes by such acts in the eyes of the law a traitor and a rebel, as much as he who takes up arms against the legitimate Government of his country.

This would be the decision in the courts in time of peace; how much more, then, is the conduct of such men treasonous when the whole nation is in a state of war, and the Government struggling with a rebellion whose object is to dismember the country and destroy the Constitution ? Every word and deed calculated to destroy the popular confidence in the power of the Government to defend itself, under such circumstances, is a blow aimed at the vitality of the nation, and a stab in the back of every soldier whose face is turned to the armed rebels who strike at him in front. The man who, covertly or openly, seeks the destruction of my country's defenders, or gives aid and encouragement to my country's foes, is a public enemy, for whom I have nothing but the bitter word and, at the proper time, the deadly blow. Those who are not for the Government are against it.

I have many and dear friends in the disloyal States, as well as disloyal friends in the loyal States, who are opposed to my course and views in the present struggle; and though I am ready to meet them in the field, North or South, to try the justice of the cause I uphold, still, from a sense of gratitude, I frankly affirm that my heart yearns towards them, and, were I swayed by my affections instead of my sense of right and wrong, I should be inclined to find excuses for their rebellious attitude. I cannot eritirely shut out of my heart and memory recollections of friendly offices and kindly sympathies extended to me, in times gone by, by those who, without doubt, were happier under the then existing state of things than they could ever be were their wildest schemes of sectional aggrandizement perfected and secured.

I can truly say, “ Not that I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more,” is the cause of my antagonism to the rebellious attitude of the seceding States.

Poetry a Substitute for Speech-Making.

(An EXTRACT FROM MR. MURDOCH'S LECTURES.) “ THE American Flag,” by Joseph Rodman Drake, needs no prologue. It is probably the finest lyric the world has ever known or read; and it is to be regretted that, when it is sung, it is adapted to a mere opera-air.

When Cincinnati was threatened, and I among the rest of her citizens volunteered to her defence, I was induced to recite this grand national hymn under the following circumstances.

Our pickets were skirmishing with those of the enemy; within sight of our intrenchments, our citizens of all classes and ages had been working in the rifle-pits the previous day and night, and during the morning of the day I speak of, and after partaking of their mid-day meal, they were resting from their labors, under the shade of some large beech-trees. In passing from the head-quarters of General

may determine, for the relief of the soldiers. Of course, no subscriptions can be received after this date. The original intention of printing the subscribers' names has been abandoned, on account of the increased size of the book, as it now contains nearly one-third more of printed matter than was at first intended. The entire profits from the publication will be given to the charities above mentioned.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

15

............

Introduction to “Patriotic Readings".
Poetry a Substitute for Speech-Making

19 The American Flag .........

21 Mr. Lincoln at Home in Springfield, and Mr. Lincoln at the White House in Washington

23 Lincoln at Springfield, 1861.........

29 Mr. Lincoln's Letter to the Kentucky Delegates, April 4, 1864...... 31 The President's Letter to Mr. Murdoch, and Poem.........

34 The Prescience of the Poet..............

36 Extract from “The New Pastoral”.

37 The Relics .............

41 Poem by William Cullen Bryant.....

44 The Memento to Secretary Chase........

46 Items concerning the Treaty Elm...................

49 Incidents in the History of the Old War-Ship the Alliance........... 52 Old Ironsides........

54 The Shreds of the Flag-Halliards of the Cumberland................. 55 Three Eras.........

59 Mr. Boker as a Dramatic Poet........

67 The Ballad of New Orleans

69 Coming Events Cast their Shadows Before.

77 The Union.-A National Song.

79 The Power of Music and Verse as Incitements to Valor........... 80 Our Defenders.........

82 Poetry and Painting as Kindred Arts ..........

83 Victory does not always reward Valor.....................................

87 PAGE

88

116

127

The Battle of Lookout Mountain ........
“The Peculiar Institution,” and Stonewall Jackson's Hatred of
the Old Flag

93 Barbara Frietchie...........

98 An Incident of the War........

100 The Sleeping Sentinel.......

103 On Board the Cumberland .......

108 An Invocation to Loyalty..........

114 The Oath........ Gettysburg .........

........... 118 The Cemetery and the Battle-Field ................ .................

121 The School-Boy's Lesson in Poetry remembered by the Soldier on the Field of Battle ......

125 Marco Bozzaris......... Heroes Die, but Heroism is Eternal...............

130 Count Candespina's Standard

131 Don't Give up the Ship ........

135 The Launching of the Ship .....

138 The Dying Soldier.....

142 The Rising, 1776.......

144 Before Vicksburg.......

148 Our Heroes

150 Wounded

152 An Old Friend in a New Dress........

154 Lines on the New American Frigate Alliance.

156 Charleston Harbor in 1776 and 1861 Scott and the Veteran ........ Paul Jones, and the Navy of the Revolution......... The Bonhomme Richard. ......... Paul Jones.........

169 Our Heroes........

................. 171

... 158

... 160 ......... 162 ........ 168

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