Memoirs of Henry Richard, the Apostle of Peace

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Trübner & Company, 1889 - Politicians - 212 pages
 

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Page 67 - I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that. What I do about slavery and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union.
Page 127 - Whereupon, the Plenipotentiaries do not hesitate to express, in the name of their Governments, the wish that States, between which any serious misunderstanding may arise, should, before appealing to arms, have recourse, as far as circumstances might allow, to the good offices of a friendly Power.
Page 30 - ... allow, to the good offices of a friendly Power. The Plenipotentiaries hope that the Governments not represented at the Congress will unite in the sentiment which has inspired the wish recorded in the present Protocol.
Page 189 - That an humble address be presented to her Majesty, praying that she will be graciously pleased to direct...
Page 67 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it...
Page 115 - I assent entirely to the opinion of the Lord Chief Justice of England that the Alabama ought to have been detained during the four days I was waiting for the opinion of the law officers. But I think that the fault was not that of the commissioners of customs, it was my fault as Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
Page 212 - The voice at midnight came; He started up to hear ; A mortal arrow pierced his frame — He fell, but felt no fear.
Page 56 - I have another and a far brighter vision before my gaze. It may be but a vision, but I will cherish it. I see one vast confederation stretching from the frozen North in unbroken line to the glowing South, and from the wild billows of the Atlantic westward to the calmer waters of the Pacific main, — and I see one people, and one language, and one law, and one faith, and, over all that wide continent, the home of freedom, and a refuge for the oppressed of every race and of every clime.
Page 53 - Let us no longer lend a factious importance to the subversive spirit of extreme parties by opposing ourselves on narrow calculations to the legitimate aspirations of peoples. Let us have the courage to substitute for a sickly and precarious condition of things a situation solid and regular, even should it cost us some sacrifices.
Page 64 - It thus appears that certain individuals have been forcibly taken from on board a British vessel, the ship of a neutral Power, while such vessel was pursuing a lawful and innocent voyage, an act of violence which was an affront to the British flag and a violation of international law.

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