The New Fourth Reader

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Benziger Brothers, 1885 - Readers (Elementary) - 286 pages
 

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Page 248 - I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER. I REMEMBER, I remember The house where I was born, The little window where the sun Came peeping in at morn : He never came a wink too soon, Nor brought too long a day, But now I often wish the night Had borne my breath away ! I remember, I remember...
Page 155 - The names of those who love the Lord." "And is mine one?
Page 249 - I remember, I remember Where I was used to swing, And thought the air must rush as fresh To swallows on the wing ; My spirit flew in feathers then That is so heavy now, And summer pools could hardly cool The fever on my brow. I remember, I remember The fir-trees dark and high ; I used to think their slender tops Were close against the sky : It was a childish ignorance, But now 'tis little joy To know I'm farther off from Heaven Than when I was a boy.
Page 249 - I REMEMBER, I REMEMBER I REMEMBER, I remember, The house where I was born, The little window where the sun Came peeping in at morn; He never came a wink too soon, Nor brought too long a day, But now, I often wish the night Had borne my breath away! I remember, I remember, The roses, red and white, The violets, and the lily-cups, Those flowers made of light!
Page 155 - Abou Ben Adhem — may his tribe increase ! — Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, And saw, within the moonlight in his room, Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom, An angel, writing in a book of gold. Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And to the Presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?
Page 111 - Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam, Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home...
Page 138 - Here shall the wild-bird sing, And still thy branches bend. Old tree, the storm still brave ! And, woodman, leave the spot; — While I've a hand to save, Thy axe shall harm it not.
Page 269 - Just then, with a wink and a sly normal lurch, The owl, very gravely, got down from his perch, Walked round, and regarded his fault-finding critic (Who thought he was stuffed) with a glance analytic, And then fairly hooted, as if he should say : " Your learning's at fault this time, anyway ; Don't waste it again on a live bird, I pray. I'm an owl ; you're another. Sir Critic, good day ! " And the barber kept on shaving.
Page 154 - ... the herbage only on one side of its path ; and I perceived that it was lame in one leg, from the faint impression which that particular foot had produced upon the sand. " I concluded that the animal had lost one tooth, because, wherever it had grazed, a small tuft of herbage was left uninjured in the centre of its bite. As to that which formed the burden of the beast, the busy ants informed me that it was corn on the one side, and the clustering flies that it was honey on the other.
Page 274 - There's a wideness in God's mercy Like the wideness of the sea, There's a kindness in His justice Which is more than liberty.

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