History of Kentucky, Volume 1

Front Cover
American Historical Society, 1922 - Kentucky - 662 pages
 

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Contents

I
iii
II
xxv
III
13
V
38
VI
47
VII
55
VIII
65
X
73
XXXVI
277
XXXVII
284
XXXIX
295
XLI
305
XLIII
316
XLV
323
XLVI
334
XLVIII
344

XI
92
XIII
108
XIV
132
XV
158
XVI
171
XVIII
183
XXI
198
XXII
210
XXIII
219
XXV
224
XXVII
233
XXVIII
237
XXIX
243
XXX
250
XXXII
258
XXXIV
267
L
357
LIII
374
LIV
388
LV
401
LVI
422
LVII
432
LIX
455
LXI
467
LXIII
483
LXV
497
LXVIII
509
LXIX
514
LXX
522
LXXI
543
Copyright

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Page 372 - They tend to render alien to each other those who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection. The inhabitants of our western country have lately had a useful lesson on this head. They have seen, in the negotiation by the executive, and in the unanimous ratification by the senate, of the treaty with Spain, and in the universal satisfaction at that event throughout the United States, a...
Page 416 - Constitution as cognizable by them; that they may transfer its cognizance to the President or any other person, who may himself be the accuser, counsel, judge and jury, whose suspicions may be the evidence, his order the sentence, his officer, the executioner, and his breast the sole record of the transaction; that a very numerous and valuable description of the inhabitants of these States...
Page 420 - That although this commonwealth, as a party to the federal compact, will bow to the laws of the Union, yet it does, at the same time, declare that it will not now, or ever hereafter, cease to oppose In a constitutional manner every attempt, at what quarter soever offered, to violate that compact.
Page 426 - The day that France takes possession of New Orleans fixes the sentence which is to restrain her forever within her low water mark. It seals the union of two nations who, in conjunction, can maintain exclusive possession of the ocean. From that moment we must marry ourselves to the British fleet and nation.
Page 415 - That the government created by this compact was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among parties having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions, as of the mode and measure of redress.
Page 281 - The general assembly shall have no power to pass laws for the emancipation of slaves, without the consent of their owners, or without paying their owners, previous to such emancipation, a full equivalent in money for the slaves so emancipated.
Page 312 - That all murder, which shall be perpetrated by means of poison, or by lying in wait, or by any other kind of wilful, deliberate and premeditated killing, or which shall be committed in the perpetration or attempt to perpetrate any arson, rape, robbery, or burglary, shall be deemed murder of the first degree ; and all other kinds of murder shall be deemed murder in the second degree...
Page 313 - Assembly, shall, during the term for which he shall have been elected, be appointed to any civil office of profit under this State, which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during such term, except such offices as may be filled by elections by the people.
Page 443 - April, 1818, by which, amongst other things, it was declared that, if any person shall, within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States, begin, or set on foot, or provide or prepare the means for any military expedition or enterprise, to be carried on from thence...
Page 420 - Resolved, That this Commonwealth considers the Federal Union upon the terms and for the purposes specified in the late compact, as conducive to the liberty and happiness of the several States ; that it does now unequivocally declare its attachment to the Union, and to that compact, agreeably to its obvious and real intention, and will...

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