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greater breadth sown. Sorghum has also in- horses, mules, and swine has slightly decreased
creased in quantity in Ilinois, the crop being from the great demand of the war; the num-
one-quarter more than in 1862. The amount ber of working cattle and cows has remained
of cotton raised in the States north of the nearly stationary from the same cause, but the
Ohio River is nearly 40 per cent. greater than number of sheep has increased 9,242,119. The
in 1862. There has been a serious falling off clip of wool for the year, it is thought, will
in the quantity of root crops in all the States not fall much short of 100,000,000 pounds,
except Vermont, Connecticut, Delaware, Illi- while the consumption is about 150,000,000
nois, and West Virginia. The entire diminu- pounds. The climate of California is found
tion of these crops is about 15 per cent. In well adapted to wool growing, and the sheep
the Eastern and Middle States the yield of are sheared twice a year there. The fall clip,
apples, peaches, and pears was large, the the growth of the summer months, is short,
markets being for a time glutted with peaches; dry, and brittle, and of inferior quality, answer-
but in the Western and Northwestern States ing to the low-priced India wools. Kansas
the great frosts of the winter of 1863–'4 de- and Nebraska, Central Illinois, and Texas are
_stroyed a large proportion of the fruit trees, also excellent climates for wool growing, and
and there was a scarcity of peaches and apples. the present price of wool has greatly developed
The stock of apples in the market was so the production of that staple.
greatly reduced by exportation and the short- The production of molasses and sugar from
ness of the crop, that in January, 1865, ap- the sorghum has increased during the year.
ples of ordinary quality brought from $5.00 The syrup or molasses is now refined on a large
to $8 per barrel at wholesale. The grape scale at Chicago and Cincinnati, and the result
crop was fully up to the average, and larger is very satisfactory; the unpleasant taste which
quantities than usual were absorbed in the had proved a serious objection to its use being
manufacture of wine. This has become a spe- removed by the refining process, and a syrup
ciality at several points on the Hudson River, resulting which differs but little from the best
on the islands in and near Sandusky Bay, sugar-house syrups of Stuarts, Woolsey, and
Lake Erie, in the vicinity of Cincinnati, Ohio, other refiners. There seems to be a difficulty
along the Missouri and Osage Rivers in Mis- in making sugar from most of the sorghum
souri, and in California. The production of molasses, probably from the fact that the cane
wine in California has reached an extent and is seldom perfectly matured when crushed.
excellence which enables the wine-growers of Small quantities of fair sugar have been pro-
that State to enter into successful competition duced, but for the most part it is used only in
with the great vineyards of Europe, and it is the form of molasses or syrup. Within the
rapidly increasing.

past two years the attempt has been made on
There has been a heavy reduction in the a large scale in Illinois to cultivate the sugar-
number of swine fattened for market during beet for the production of sugar. It is yet too
the year, owing mainly to the scarcity of corn early to pronounce definitely on the success of
in 1863–4. This reduction amounts probably the enterprise, but it promises fairly. Four
to nearly 40 per cent. The receipt of live hogs hundred and eighty thousand tons, one-sixth
in New York in 1862 was 1,098,712 ; in 1863, of all the sugar used in the world, is now pro-
1,096,773 ; in 1864, only 657,092. The falling duced from the sugar-beet, mainly in France
off in the exports of pork from New York as and its colonies, and there seems no good
compared with those of 1863, was 60,000 bar- reason why we should not produce it as suc-
rels, or one-third; of cut meats, 88,000,000 cessfully as other nations. The amount of su-
pounds, or very nearly one-half; 'and of lard, gar produced from the maple shows a consider-
77,000,000 pounds, or about two-thirds. In able increase over previous years, the season
Cincinnati and Chicago the amount of pork having been a favorable one, and the high
packed was larger than in 1863, but this was prices of sugars creating an unusual demand
at the expense of the smaller packing points. for it.
The number of hogs packed in the packing Of leguminous plants (peas and beans) the
season of 1863–'4 was 3,389,427. The season crop is somewhat less than in 1863, the falling
of 1864'5 is not yet (January, 1865) closed, off being mainly in peas, the bean crop being
but it is estimated that the number packed nearly or quite an average one. This crop has
will be not far from 2,500,000. The number greatly increased in importance from the large
of swine in stock in 1864 in the loyal States, army demand for it. The production of butter
is estimated by the Commissioner of Agricul- and cheese is nearly identical with that of 1863,
ture to have been 16,140,712, a reduction of but owing to the increased export demand and
nearly a million since 1859. Of other farm the depreciation of the currency, remarkably
stock, the number, according to his careful and high prices have ruled for all dairy products.
reliable estimates, were as follows: Horses, The following tables give the production of
4,049,142; mules, 280,847; bulls and working the principal staple agricultural products in
cattle, 7,965,439; cows, 6,066,748; sheep, 24,- each of the loyal States and Territories in 1864,
346,391. The only considerable increase in as compared with the returns of 1862 and 1863.
live stock since 1859 (the year reported in the They are from the valuable bi-monthly reports
Census of 1860) is in sheep. The number of of the Agricultural Department:

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TABLE SHOWING THE AMOUNTS OF THE PRINCIPAL CROPS OF 1864, IN BUSHES &c., AS ESTIMATED FROM THE RETURNS OF CORRESPONDENTS, COMPARED WITH THE CROPS OF 1869 AND 1863-
WISAT,

BYE
BARLEY.

OATS. STATES.

1862.

1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864. Maine.

850,815 215,784 167,194 184,889 165,951 128,612 1,002,636 1,002,636 668,424 8,738.423
New Hampshire.
818,954 255,163

8,864,681
251,618 162,033 145,830

2,102,994

109,873 141,287 127,159 96,278
Vermont.
502,981 452, 688

1,495,865
497,951 180,976

1,345,829
180,976 140,798

1,095,891

94,102 94,102 94,102
Massachusetts
129,765 129,765

4,889,506 8,950,556
128,143 888,085

8,611,938
388,085 418,957 168, 613 151, 752 149,584
Rhode Island.

1,475,094
1,413
1,418
1,413 38,911

1,827,585 1,194,827

88,911 37,302 51,241 46,117 41,506 Connecticut.

59,901 59,901

253,990 71,881 618,762

203,192 182,873

618,762 721,8 20,813 20,813 18,782 New York. 18,021,650 13,021,650

1,603,936 1,764,829 10,918, 615 5,885,268 5,885,268 5,205,759

2,011,334

4,882,778 4,882,778
New Jersey,
1,808, 128

8,710,911
1,808,128

48,968,916 48,968,916 85,724, 746
1,682, 118 1,499,497 1,499,497 1,424,528 83,220 29,098 29,098
Pennsylvania.
15, 654,255 15,654,255

6,446,958 4,902,263
12,628,404

5,735,647
6,843,427 6,843,427 6,848,427 636,869
6,053,480

678,174
Maryland..
7,208,828

680,491
6,487,946 608,901

84,283,986 84,283,986
548,011

87,657 329

629,744 21,887 19,699 26,591
Delaware..
1,217,254 1,217,254

4,524,912
1,054,954

4,072,421
84,011

5,429,894
87,412 41,158 4,254
5,546,108

5,105
5,646,108

4,595 1,308,687
Kentucky....

1,670,864
8,882,275

1,884,437
791,447 791,447 654,014 203,014 802,014 256,718
Ohio
80,796,032 28, 742,963 20,407,503

8,562,772 8,562,772 4,846,826
1,079,040 863, 232 704,974 1,512,625 1,399,086 1,588,680
14,963, 785
Michigan.

10,980,935
18,966,153 18,966,153

12,024,028
494,197

14,428,888
494,197 434,894 407,885 407,885 888,888
Indiana...
20,292, 160

6,430,797
20,292,160

6,430,797
22,821,876 444,695

4,810,136
411,343 897,632 845,767 311,191 889,198
Illinois...
82,213,500

5,028,755
81,408,163 88,371,173

5,881,630 6,084,798
981,822 883,190 850,071 1,175,651 1,205,042 1,144,790
Missouri...
8,170,690 2,853,621

17,892,200 19,681,420
8,281,514

24,273, 751
893,262 219,947 287,542 171,377 171,377
Wisconsin

162,809
20,842,859

,660,653
20,765,781

2,128,522 2,128.522
14,168,817 1,066,241 1,012,929 810,843 905, 323 950,689

674,919
Iowa
10,541,506 12,649,807 12,649,807

18,271,124 14,598,236 12,043,638
111,266 122,892 119,833 344,989 599,432 584,446
Minnesota
2,927,749 2,634,975

7,055,588
2,684,975

7,761,141
155,823

9,813,869
179,791 161,974 156,412 156,412 148,592 2,934,067
Kansas
202,282 262,953 201,595 4,718

2,053,848 2,259,232
5,184 4,061 4,958 6,448 5,901
150,000
Nebraska Territory.

96,892
180,600 126,000

116,270 146,500
2,000 2,000 1,600 2,486 5,446

4,680 159,954 267,989 228,284 Total.

181,188,089 179,404,086 160,695,828 21,289,451 20,782,782 19,872,975 12,488,022 11,467,155 / 10,716,828 171,463,405 178,800,575 176,690,064
OORN.

TOBACCO.
STATES.

BUCKWHEAT.

POTATOES,
1862. 1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864. 1862. 1863. 1864.
Maine
1,855,285 1,853,285 1,410,017

7,000

452,693
New Hampshire..

7,437,053
1,668,285

407,424 850,837
1,835, 113 1,384,628

6,698,848 7,189,151
50,000 64,000 98,995
1,585,020 1,743,522
Vermont

87,447

98,995
1,585,020

4,137,704 3,810,163 8,842,154
40,000 59,000 233,906
2,465, 215

283,906
2,465, 215

210,516
Massachusetts

5,148,531
2,280,324

8,603,972 6,920,810
4,041,497 5,200,000 6,760,000 128,302
Rhode Island.
458,912 413,021

128,802 110,972 8,201,901 2,881,711
474,208

8,884,878
1,680 1,848 8,871
2,059,835

8,871 3,097 543,855
Connecticut.
2,059,835

435,084
2,059,885

525,727
7,550,166 7,500,166 9,900,218 884,032
New York...
24,078,257

887,477

800,629
24,078,257

1,893,148
22,628,862

2,016,462 1,883,148
7,205,727 10,088,017 12,912,662 5,976,805 5,878 675 5,677,490 83,059,285
New Jersey,
10,023,886 11,025,669 8,464,262

29,753,898 29,753,812

194,330 179,755 1052,863
Pennsylvania
80,721,821 80,721,821

947,577

4,693,151
921,256

,693,151
28,881,685 8,976,982

3,989,179
5,567,774 6,124,551
Maryland
14,444,922

6,686,431
14,444,922

5,794,907 7,577,955 14,609,385
10,509,243

14,609,885 12,661,424 40,601,179 48,721,415 83,292,968 8,892,837

242,672 8,892,837 Delaware.

218,405

1,517,134
3,892,887

189,285

1,213,707 1,061,994
12,128 15,618 14,057 18,899
48,032,725
Kentucky
62,885,997

15,641
18,899

877,931
42,828,706

802,845 827,540
113,912,938 56,956,469
71,792,253

14,187
57,438,802

14,187 14,187
Ohio

1,181,789 1,449,188 1,255,921
68,202,641 25,528,972 28,081,869 29,017,931 1,181,947 827,364
Michigan..
15,190,187 10,638,097

1,300,141 5,128, 756 4,103,005 4,616,881
11,088,801 160,825 207,061 248,473 900,652 680,457
02,855,454

828,453 5,264, 788 Indiana 54,602,278

4,788, 260 8,422,078 74,284,363 9,057,665 10,416,314 8,767,065 367,797 183,898 Hlinois. 188,856,135 88,018,681

4,807,271

272,171
188,856,135

8,485,617 2,904,847
9,452,807 20,897,587 18,867,722 481,836 258,802
Missouri
54,679, 118

280,870
43,743,295

$444,404
36,685,011

6,155,528 4,511,083
28,609,948 26,340,505 18,697,063 136,719 95,708
10,087,058
Wisconsin

72,461
8,069,642

1,498,519
10,087,053

1,498,519 776,630
109,493 153,189 148,083 84,527
Iowa.
49,340,893 84,588,276

59,170 78,258 4,810, 681 4,856,569 3,582,068 65,261,240 875,502 800,402 890,522 276,524 155,914 276,524 Minnesota 2,756,898

2,520,481 8,983,426

8,600,686 2,880,549 4,647,829 48,137 48,824 84,659 84,096 20,758 81,714 2,703,926 2,433,584 2,168,141 Kansas 6,814,601 8,518, 251 4,678,081 21,223 26,891

22,048 44,158 27,966 24,288 854,960

425,952

184,480 Nebraska Territory.

1,846,785 1,292, 750 1,366,622

1,900 1,140 12,829 6,146 169,762 124,334

106,102 18,700,540 113,234,614

96,256,888

100,158,670 680,581,403 136,751,746 267,267,920 197,468,829 18,708,145 15,806,455 Total. 586,226,808 451,967,959

[graphic]

HAY-TONS.

Maine

694,161

Vermont..
Masisehusetts
Rhode Island.

908,289

760,617

423,783

436.496

Ohio.
Michigan

962,805

Illinois

899,599

Wisconsin.
Iowa
Minnesota

but not very palatable variety; the Diana,

which has not maintained its first reputation, STATES.

and the Israella, a new seedling of Dr. Grant's,

which may prove valuable. Of the strictly 1862. 1863. 1864.

wine-grapes, the Norton's Virginia seedling

and the Herbemont are highly prized. 1,170,559 1,170,859 1,035, 705 The culture of the grape for wine-making is New Hampsbire..

771,259 771,289
985,654

985,654 850,127 now extensively prosecuted in five localities, 908,259

and a sixth is about entering very largely upon 82,725 82,725 62,044 Connectient 562, 445 662,445 449,956

its production. These are : 1st. Iona Island New York.

4,453,982 4,901.680 3,921,264 and Oroton Point on the Hudson, where Dr. Ser Jersey 529,729

Grant and Mr. Underhill have extensive vinePennsylvania

2,245,420 1,796,836 1,796,336 Maryland

195,244 156,195 167,909 yards; the Isabella, Catawba, and Iona being Delvire.

40,054 82,043 88,111 the principal varieties cultivated for wine. 2d. Kentucky

118,863 106,977 112,825 2,078,898 1,347,711 1,415,096

The Cincinnati Wine district, extending fifteen 1,135,862 1,059,671 847,787 or twenty miles around that city, in which the 847,096 981,805

Catawba is almost exclusively raised. 3d. The 2,292,831 2,063,548 2,166,725 Missouri 467,915 827,541

Northern Ohio Wine district, embracing two 1,067,248 1,067,248 789,765 distinct sections : one from five to twenty 849,712 678,970 814,764 866,603 256,621 249,289

miles east and west of Cleveland along the Kansas

63,515 82,569 82,569 lake shore, and raising the Cuyahoga, Catawba, Nebrasks Territory. 28,735 22,988 18,391 Norton's Virginia, and other wine-grapes; and Total...... 20,257,968 19,786,847 18,116,761

the Island Vineyards in Ottawa County, em

bracing Danbury and Catawba Island townGRAPE CULTURE.—The culture of the grape, ships on the mainland, and Put-in-Bay townboth for wine-making and for table purposes, ship, including the three islands of South, has come to be one of the largest agricultural Middle, and North Bass in Lake Erie. Here interests in some sections of the country, and the Catawba grape stands preëminent, though is proceeding with rapid strides. The grape is some others are cultivated. 4th. The Missouri cultivated in almost every township of the Wine district, of which Hermann on the MisNorthern States for table use, and there has souri River is the centre, and which extends been for several years past an extraordinary for fifteen or twenty miles around it. Here the rivalry in regard to the varieties best adapted Norton's Virginia seedling is preferred, though for cultivation for this purpose. It seems to many are cultivating the Herbemont and some be very generally conceded that the Isabella, a the Catawba and the Delaware. 5th, and favorite table-grape in Southern New York, par excellence the Wine region of America, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, is more subject California. The largest wine-producing counto the blight, and is a less fruitful bearer than ties are Los Angelos,

Anaheim, Santa Clara and some other varieties. The Catawba, a favorite Sonoma, but there are considerable vineyards wine-grape in some sections, is liable to rot, in other counties. and is hardly equal for the table to other va- There have been more than twelve millions rieties. The Hartford Prolific, which is earlier of vines set in the State, and eleven-twelfths by two weeks than any other of the popular of them within the past seven years. The grapes, is an abundant bearer, but is thick- Mission grape, an old and perhaps indigenous skinned and not particularly fine flavored. The variety, is as yet the most abundant of the bearConcord, an admirable grape, is not very pro- ing vines; but all the European and Eastern lific, and does not succeed very well north of varieties have been set, and most of them are latitude 46°. The Delaware, also an excellent doing well in the fine deep soil of the State. grape and more hardy, is not usually a free One million five hundred thousand gallons of bearer; and, owing to attempts to propagate it wine were sent to market in 1864, and it is from immature buds, has fallen into undeserved believed that the product of 1865 will not fall disrepote. The Iona, a seedling produced by C. short of two and a half million gallons. The W. Grant, a vine-grower at Iona Island on the wines of the State are of excellent quality, Hudson, has been adjudged, during the past and improve with age. year, the premiam offered by Hon. Horace A sixth wine district is about coming into Greeley for the best table-grape in all respects. notice in Central Illinois; some of the prairie Dr. Grant claims for it, and his claim seems to lands proving well adapted to grape-culture. be maintained, that it is early, a good bearer, These various wine districts, like those in not subject to blight or rot, of fine flavor and Europe, not only require different varieties of thin skin. This grape can hardly fail to have the grape, but make wine of different qualities, an extensive introduction. Of other varieties and adopt different modes of cultivation, and having a local reputation, are the Adirondac different processes in the manufacture of the of Northern New York, the Maxatawney, a wine. The northernmost wine districts usually favorite in Pennsylvania, the uyahoga, Lydia, dwarf their vines; and whether cultivating the and Mottled, originating in Northern Ohio, Catawba, the Cuyahoga, the Delaware, or the and much liked there; the Clinton, a hardy Iona, train them to short posts, giving them

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the benefit of as much sun as possible. The the southeast extremity, lower valley of the wines produced in these districts are generally Hudson, and near some of the minor lakes, but light in body or in the per cent. of alcohol they appear on the southern border of Lake Erie, in contain, and somewhat acidulous, resembling Northern Indiana and Northern Illinois." the Rhenish wines and clarets in strength. “Those places which enjoy a summer mean In the Missouri district the vines are trained of 73°, a hot month of 75°, and a September of on trellis, and the Norton's Virginia and Her- 65°, will ripen the Catawba and Anna. Their bemont grapes are preferred. The wine is growing season corresponds to a mean of 72°, stronger, and resembles Port in color, astrin- and an aggregate of 11,000“. They are not gency, and percentage of alcohol. In Cali- found north of New York City and vicinity, fornia wines of all grades are made; most of or the southeast counties of Pennsylvania, Midtheir best wines, however, have considerable dle New Jersey, or Southern Ohio, Indiana, body, and some of them a decided astringency. Illinois, or Missouri. There is one exception The California Port and Sherry are not inferior to these localities, viz., the islands and peninsula in quality to their European congeners. The near Sandusky, in Lake Erie, where the CatawMuscatel and Angelica seem to be rather cor- ba, owing to the effect of the water on the dials than wines, containing from 22 to 30 per temperature, will ripen completely during most cent. of alcohol, and, it is said, are made by seasons. adding brandy to the unfermented must, and “Those places which bask under a glowing clarifying. They contain about 16 per cent of summer of 74', a hot month of 75°, and a Sepgrape-sugar.

tember of 75°, like Los Angelos County and Careful investigations have been made with- some other portions of California, other cirin the last year, to ascertain the aggregate cumstances being favorable, may ripen the most number of degrees of heat requisite during the tender European wine grapes to perfection." season or cycle of growth to perfecting our In 1862, at Waterloo, N. Y., the Delaware best known varieties of grapes, and the tem- grape and the Hartford Prolific were 122 days perature necessary at the commencement of from leafing to ripening; the Union Village, growth, the average mean of the summer, the 125; the Clinton, 127; the Diana and Concord, mean temperature of the hottest month, and 133; the Rebecca, 138; the Isabella and Catawthe mean temperature of September, required ba, 142; the To Kalon, 144; while the Anna by each.

These particulars are of great im- was still unripe at the end of 154 days. The portance to vine-growers as a guide to the average temperature from leafing to maturity, variety of grape best adapted to their purpose. was about 64.6°, that from leafing to blooming They have been made the subject of an elabo- about 59°, the hottest month about 69', and rate and able paper by Mr. James S. Lippen- from bloom to ripening about 67.5°. cott, of Haddonfield, New Jersey, in the Gov- There is, however, another element which ernment Agricultural Report for 1863. We must enter into the possibility of the successful can only briefly notice the conclusions at which cultivation of the vine, viz., the amount of huhe arrives. “Those places which have a sum- midity in the climate. If the period from leafmer temperature of 66.5°, a hot month of 70°, ing to blooming be sufficiently humid to deand a September of 60°, will ripen the Dela- velop favorably these processes, the vine will ware, Clinton, Perkins, Logan, and some other succeed in maturing its grapes perfectly with a very hardy varieties. The temperature of very slight amount of rain thereafter, provided their growing season corresponds to a mean of only the heat is sufficient. The dry, and during 65° and upwards, and an aggregate of heat of the summer almost rainless, climate of Califorabout 8,000° F. This district includes many nia is better adapted to the cultivation of the parts of New England and New York, North- grape than the rainy districts of Southern Oreern Pennsylvania, Northern Michigan, Wiscon- gon, or the lower portion of the Apalachian sin, and Iowa."

chain in East Tennessee, Western North and “Those places which have a summer of 70°, South Carolina, and Northern Georgia. In these a hot month of 72°, and a September of 63°, the grape matures with difficulty, and lacks will ripen the Concord, Hartford Prolific, Di- sweetness. Yet, from the greater equability ana, Crevelling, &c. Their season of growth of its temperature, an inland climate is prefercorresponds to a mean of 67., and an aggregate able for the lighter wine-grapes to the mainof 8,500° and upwards. This district covers land, notwithstanding its greater humidity, but part of the southeast and south coast of New will hardly produce the strong wines of a dryer England, valleys of Hudson and Mohawk, neigh- and more tropical latitude. There are many borhood of the minor lakes in Western New indications that portions of Louisiana, ArkanYork, southern border of Lake Ontario, South- sas, and Texas, will yet prove the finest wine ern Michigan, Southern Wisconsin, etc." regions of the Atlantic slope, possessing, as they

“Those places which have a summer of 72°, do, the qualifications of rich soil, genial tema hot month of 73°, and a September of 65°, perature, and moderate humidity. will ripen the Isabella and Rebecca. Their The following table exhibits the exports of growing season corresponds to a mean of 70°, produce from New York for 355 days of 1863 and an aggregate of 10,000° of heat. They are and 1864, and the prices ruling in December, not found in the State of New York, except in 1864, in New York and Chicago :

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For the purpose of comparison, we give also The subjoined is a general summary of the the prices of the principal cereals, &c., in Lon- crops of 1862, 1863, and 1864, giving the prices don on the 1st of December, for 5 years past. and values of the crops of 1862 and 1863, but The English quarter is equivalent to 8 bushels : the amount only of that of 1864, as the prices 1864. 1863. 1862. 1861. 1860.

and values are not yet determined. It is known,

however, that they will not fall below $1,500,Wheat..per quarter $9 22 $9 78 $11 22 $14 48 $12 62

000,000, and may reach $1,600,000,000. CaliBarley

9 40

fornia, Oregon, and Kentucky are excluded in Rye .do..

8 40 1862 and 1863, and California and Oregon in ..do...

1864 : 8 06

......do...

Oats,.

do...

5 88

6 76 4 86 6 40 9 08 8 50

8 04 4 66 7 10 8 46

8 16
5 00
8 16
9 12
9 60

8 89 5 44 9 08 10 22 10 48

Beans..
Peas

11 46
10 80

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Yield per

XAYES OF PROD

UCTS.

crop in

scre in
1863.

For the sake of future comparison, a table is The temperature and the average rain-fall in added showing the number of acres in each each State exert so much influence on the quancrop in 1863, the value of the crop, the price tity and quality of the crops, that the following per bushel, &c., and the yield per acre: table, though not later than the close of 1863,

cannot fail to be of great interest to all who Acres Value of

are engaged in agricultural pursuits. The incultivat'd

Price in
1863.

telligent young farmer will find these tables an in 1863. 1863.

infallible guide in regard to the culture of some Indian corn..acres 15,312,441 $278,118,972 $0 69 9-10 25 9-10 crops on which he might otherwise be disposed Wheat .......do. 18,098,936 198,249,108 1 14 0-10 13 3-10

to venture. The cotton crop, which requires Rye .........do. 1,439,607 20,651,117) 1 03 0-10 13 9-10 Oats... ....do. 6,686,174 107,116,893 62 8-10 25 4-10 during the months of its growth a warm, moist Barley 657,299 13,674,465 1 11 0-10 21 8-10

climate, will not answer in California, because Backwheat...do. 1,054,060 12,654,801 82 2-10 15 0-10

..do. 1,129,804 54.961,290 60 6-10 99 6-10 during those months the rain-fall is very scanty. Hay:

....do.

do. 15,641,504 248,677,122 18 50 0-10 117-100 Nor is that climate favorable to Indian corn, Tobacco......do. 216,423 24,385,744 14 9-10 754 6-10

for the same reason. The tables for 1864 will Total. 58,186,248 $958,489,012

appear in the next volume.

Potatoes.....

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