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The Douglas men were very despondent after this day's experience. The delegates generally are dispirited, worried out by the long wrangle, and disgusted. It is the prevalent impression that the Democratic party has been done for. Even if it should be possible to patch up a superficial reconciliation, and nominate with a whole Convention, the nomination would be worthless. I hear it stated here a hundred times a day, by the most orthodox Democrats and rampant Southerners, "William H. Seward will be next President of the United States.' And I have heard this remark several times from South Carolinians: "I'll be damned if I don't believe Senator Seward would make a good President." The fact is, there is a large class to whom the idea of Douglas is absolutely more offensive than Seward.

Our North-western friends will go home with hatred of the Democratic party, as it has appeared here, rankling in their hearts. As Douglas" will not be the nominee, they will wish to see the nominee defeated. Some of them say, openly and earnestly, they will go home and join the Black Republicans. I never heard Abolitionists talk more uncharitably and rancorously of the people of the South, than the Douglas men here. Our North-western friends use language about the South, her institutions, and particularly her politicians, that is not fit for publication, and my scruples in that respect are not remarkably tender. A good many of them will eventually become the most intolerant Republican partisans. Their exasperation and bitterness toward the South, that has insisted upon such a gross repudiation of the only ground upon which they could stand in the North, can hardly be described. Many of them would not lift a finger to prevent the election of Seward to the Presidency. They say they do not care a d-n where the South goes, or what becomes of her. They say "she may go out of the Convention into hell," for all they care. I know it will be asserted that this is a highly-colored statement-but it certainly is not; on the other hand, it is mild. There will be no fight in the North-west worth thinking about. The Douglas men will permit the election to go by default. No matter what this Convention does after this date, the Chicago Convention has all the cards in its hands to win the next Presidency and the spoils of the Federal Government.

This is 66 a fixed fact," as the honorable President of this Convention once said. By the way, the Douglas men are desperately bitter on Caleb Cushing. They call him all manner of hard names.

People are fast leaving the town. Mr. Douglas's outside pressure has melted away. The Charleston disunionists now gloat over the pitiful and disgraceful wrangling that occupies the attention of the Con

vention.

NINTH DAY.

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MORNING SESSION.

CHARLESTON, May 2, 1860

Prior to the opening of the proceedings to-day, the Boston Brass Band, accompanying the Boston delegation, appeared in the gallery and

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played several national airs, and at the close of which, Mr. Flournoy of Arkansas proposed three cheers for the Union, which were given.

The roll of States wa called for the thirteenth ballot (202 votes being necessary to a choice), which resulted as follows:

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Before the twenty-third ballot was declared, there was trouble in the Virginia delegation. One of the votes was cast for Mr. Douglas by the delegates of one of the districts. The chairman of the State delegation was opposed to this, and produced the instructions. Gov. Todd of Ohio (temporarily in the chair), ruled that the Virginia vote could be cast for Douglas, in spite of the majority of the delegation. This vote gave Douglas on this ballot a majority of the Electoral College vote, and his

friends were greatly inspirited. If Cushing had been in the chair, the fractious Virginians would have been ruled under. Cushing rushed in, out of breath, just after the vote was declared, and took his position with some discomposure-an extraordinary thing for him.

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Douglas.
Guthrie.

Dickinson

Mr. Gittings of Monday in July.

THIRTY-FIFTH BALLOT.

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Dickinson.

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THIRTY-SIXTH BALLOT.

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Guthrie.

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THIRTY-SEVENTH BALLOT.

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THIRTY-EIGHTH BALLOT.

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AFTERNOON SESSION.

The vote of Arkansas having been cast for John C. Breckenridge in this ballot,

Mr. Beck of Kentucky asked that the vote might be withdrawn. On the part of Mr. Breckenridge, he desired to say, that it was not the desire of that gentleman that his name should be used in opposition to the distinguished gentlemen now in nomination. The vote was withdrawn.

When the vote was announced,

THIRTY-NINTH BALLOT.

Douglas.....
Guthrie.

Dickinson

Mr. Ewing of Tennessee said that the Tennessee delegation had presented a name for the nomination-Mr. Johnson. They now desired to withdraw that name, and to express the hope that a nomination might be made. Their vote on the next ballot was cast 10 for Guthrie, 1 for Douglas, and for Johnson.

FORTIETH BALLOT.

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Baltimore moved to adjourn to that city on the first
Withdrew his motion.

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Guthrie.

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Mr. Gittings said it was no use voting this way like a machine. He moved that it was inexpedient to nominate a candidate. There were cries that his motion was out of order. He said: I want to see if you'll come up and face the music. I mean to vote against it myself, but I want to find out what you're going to do. If you'll nominate Douglas we can elect him, by G-d! [Laughter and cheers.]

The President. The motion is not in order.

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Mr. Gittings. No, of course not; that's the way we are prevented getting a vote on it.

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Mr. Gittings moved to adjourn till the 1st Monday in June. Laid on the table. Adjourned.

Mr. Douglas's friends were quite nervous after getting a majority vote.

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