Ethical Challenges in the Management of Health Information

Front Cover
Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2006 - Business & Economics - 655 pages
Privacy of medical information is an important issue for health care managers. It has become more significant since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). Electronic storage and coding of patient records and the demands of many players for access to that information is one of the key forces that drove the HIPAA legislation, the cornerstone of which has to do with the privacy and maintenance of privacy of personal medical information. All of these events present the keepers and managers of health information with a host of ethical dilemmas with regard to the handling of the information. This new edition addresses HIPAA and contains new chapters on research, advocacy and specialty sites to include dialysis, correctional, dental, mental health, long-term care, home hospice and rehabilitation.

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Contents

Then And Now
5
Building an Ethical Health Information System
15
1988 American Medical Record Association Code of Ethics and Bylaws
22
Chapter 2Ethical DecisionMaking Guidelines and Tools
33
Documentation and DRG Assignment
34
Moral Distress
42
Blank Ethical DecisionMaking Matrix
50
Blanket Authorizations
59
Ethical DecisionMaking Matrices
322
Chapter 13Software Development and Implementation
329
Conclusion
335
Chapter 14Data Resource Management
341
Ethical Dilemmas for Data Resource Managers
347
Conclusion
353
Chapter 15Integrated Delivery Systems
363
Inconsistencies in the MPI
372

PART IIUses of Health Information
67
More Recent Regulations That Guide HIM Professionals
76
Accepting Money for Information
81
Chapter 5Clinical Code Selection and Use
97
Applying the AHIMA Standards of Ethical Coding
104
Miscoding to Avoid Conflicts
110
Being Required by the Employer to Engage in Negligent Coding Practices
116
The Future of Coding
122
Questionable Results
136
Abstract
139
Failure to check Physicians Licensure Status
146
Conclusion
152
Chapter 7Research and Decision Support
175
Ethical Responsibilities of the RS and DSS
181
Conclusion
195
An Overview
201
Ethical Challenges in Public Health
210
When Duty to Ones Employer Conflicts with a Duty Owed to the Public
216
The Terrorism Preparedness Act
222
Chapter Summary
224
Lessons of Integration
231
The Role of Information and HIM Professionals in a Managed Care Environment
240
Policies for which the HIM Professional Can Advocate
246
End of Life
257
An Opportunity
263
Chapter Summary
266
Part IIIComputerized Health Information
277
EHR Systems in the TwentyFirst Century
285
Differences when Linking EHR Systems
293
Conclusion
299
Chapter 12Information Security
307
Failure to Log Off of the System
315
Chapter 16EHealth for Consumers Patients and Caregivers
381
EHealth and National Policy
388
Conclusion
394
Information Technology and Information Exchange
403
The HIM Professionals Role in eHIM
411
Management of Sensitive Health Information
421
What Do We Mean by Privacy of Medical Information?
427
Ethical Issues for the HIM Professional
433
Chapter Summary
434
Seeking Information Many Years Later
440
Ethical Issues for HIM Professionals
447
Key Terms
454
Chapter 20Drug Alcohol Sexual and Behavioral Information
463
Safety of a Citizen versus Privacy of a Patient
469
A Prisoner Who May Have AIDS
475
Roles
497
National Convention Misadventures
507
Failure to Document Poor Work Performance for a Friendly Employee
513
Chapter 22Entrepreneurship
529
Concepts and Principles
535
Negotiating Contracts
549
Conclusion
555
Chapter 23Vendor Management
567
Request for Proposals
573
Enhancement of Vendor Relationships
579
Chapter 24Advocacy
595
Cockroaches in the HIM Department
602
Key Terms
608
Glossary
625
Index
639
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