Heraldry of Fish: Notices of the Principal Families Bearing Fish in Their Arms

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J. Van Voorst, 1842 - Animals, Mythical, in heraldry - 250 pages

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Page 226 - Give me my scallop-shell of quiet, My staff of faith to walk upon. My scrip of joy, immortal diet, My bottle of salvation, My gown of glory, hope's true gage; And thus I'll take my pilgrimage.
Page 37 - Forthwith the sounds and seas, each creek and bay, With fry innumerable swarm, and shoals Of fish, that with their fins and shining scales Glide under the green wave, in sculls that oft Bank the mid sea...
Page 142 - The pleasant'st angling is to see the fish Cut with her golden oars the silver stream, And greedily devour the treacherous bait...
Page 124 - In the arms of the city of Glasgow and in those of the See, a salmon, with a ring in its mouth, is said to record a miracle of St. Kentigern, the founder of the See and the first Bishop of Glasgow.
Page 20 - Stephens was a noble printer, Of knowledge firm he fixt his Tree ; But time in him made many a splinter As old Elzevir in thee. Whose name the bold .Digrammahallows...
Page 83 - The hills Rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun ; the vales Stretching in pensive quietness between ; The venerable woods, rivers that move In majesty, and the complaining brooks That make the meadows green ; and poured round all Old ocean's gray and melancholy waste Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man.
Page vii - With store of ladies, whose bright eyes Rain influence, and judge the prize Of wit or arms, while both contend To win her grace whom all commend.
Page 45 - Created hugest that swim the ocean stream : Him, haply, slumbering on the Norway foam, The pilot of some small night-foundered skiff Deeming some island, oft, as seamen tell, With fixed anchor in his scaly rind Moors by his side under the lee, while night Invests the sea, and wished morn delays...
Page 176 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take; learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; learn from the beasts the physic of the field; thy arts of building from the bee receive ; learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave ; learn of the little nautilus to sail, spread the thin oar and catch the driving gale.
Page 143 - The muse, nae poet ever fand her, Till by himsel' he learned to wander Adown some trotting burn's meander, And no' think lang ; O sweet to stray and pensive ponder A heartfelt sang...

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