The Life and Public Services of James G. Blaine: With Incidents, Anecdotes, and Romantic Events Connected with His Early Life; Containg Also His Speeches and Important Historical Documents Relating to His Later Years...

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E. C. Allen & Company, 1884 - Booksellers and bookselling - 504 pages
 

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Page 98 - The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite ; and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed. This power ought to be coextensive with all the possible combinations of such circumstances ; and ought to be under the direction of the same councils which are appointed to preside over the common defence.
Page 97 - ... to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces...
Page 386 - No might nor greatness in mortality Can censure 'scape ; back-wounding calumny The whitest virtue strikes : What king so strong Can tie the gall up in the slanderous tongue ! But who comes here ? Enter Escalus, Provost, Bawd, and Officers.
Page 120 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen, but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of selfpreservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation. To lose our country by a scrupulous adherence to written law, would be to lose the law itself, with life, liberty, property and all those who are enjoying them with us ; thus absurdly sacrificing the end to the means.
Page 394 - Gently, silently, the love of a great people bore the pale sufferer to the longedfor healing of the sea, to live or to die, as God should will, within sight of its heaving billows, within sound of its manifold voices.
Page 409 - The Republican party, having its birth in a hatred of slave labor and a desire that all men may be truly free and equal, is unalterably opposed to placing our workingmen in competition with any form of servile labor, whether at home or abroad.
Page 360 - I repeat, in conclusion, that it is the right and the duty of the United States to assert and maintain such supervision and authority over any interoceanic canal across the isthmus that connects North and South America as will protect our national interests.
Page 111 - In considering the policy to be adopted for suppressing the insurrection I have been anxious and careful that the inevitable conflict for this purpose shall not degenerate into a violent and remorseless revolutionary struggle. I have therefore in every case thought it proper to keep the integrity of the Union prominent as the primary object of the contest on our part, leaving all questions which are not of vital military importance to the more deliberate action of the Legislature.
Page 374 - It did not happen to me to be born in a log cabin ; but my elder brothers and sisters were born in a log cabin raised among the snowdrifts of New Hampshire, at a period so early that when the smoke first rose from its rude chimney and curled over the frozen hills, there was no similar evidence of a white man's habitation between it and the settlements on the rivers of Canada.
Page 407 - We, therefore, demand that the imposition of duties on foreign imports shall be made not "for revenue only," but that in raising the requisite revenues for the Government such duties shall be so levied as to afford security to our diversified industries and protection to the rights and wages of the laborer, to...

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