The Catholic Historical Review, Volume 5

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Catholic University of America Press, 1919 - Electronic journals
 

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Page 315 - ... when he speaks ex cathedra, that is, when in discharge of the office of pastor and doctor of all Christians, by virtue of his supreme Apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine regarding faith or morals to be held by the universal Church, by the divine assistance promised to him in blessed Peter, is possessed of that infallibility with which the divine Redeemer willed that his Church should be endowed for defining doctrine regarding faith or morals; and that therefore such definitions of the...
Page 315 - Council approving, we teach and define that it is a dogma divinely revealed that the Roman Pontiff, when he speaks ex cathedra, that is, when in discharge of the office of pastor and doctor of all Christians, by virtue of his supreme Apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine regarding faith or morals to be held by the universal Church...
Page 348 - Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.
Page 406 - But if he can not, or will not do this- if on any pretence, or no pretence, he shall refuse or omit it, then I shall be fully convinced, of what I more than suspect already, that he is deeply conscious of being in the wrong -that he feels the blood of this war, like the blood of Abel, is crying to Heaven against him.
Page 355 - Año de 1681 por los meses | de Enero y Febrero, se ha visto en todo el mundo, | y le ha observado en la Ciudad de Cádiz, | El P.
Page 154 - In him were united the qualities that make up the model or ideal padre ... In person he was small and compact, in expression vivacious, in manners always agreeable, though dignified. He was a frank, kind-hearted old man, who made friends of all he met. Distinguished visitors of French and English as well as of Spanish blood were impressed in like manner with his sweetness of disposition and quiet force of character. His relations with the college, with the government, and with his band of missionary...
Page 406 - I will not stop now to give my opinion concerning— to involve the two countries in a war, and trusting to escape scrutiny by fixing the public gaze upon the exceeding brightness of military glory— that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood— that serpent's eye that charms to destroy— he plunged into it, and has swept on and on till, disappointed in his calculation of the ease with which Mexico might be subdued, he now finds himself he knows not where.
Page 38 - Wrong-headed persons might doubt such tales, he said, but, he reminded all such that "for any one who will consider the wonders which God constantly does perform in this world, it will be easy to believe that since he is able to create these he may have done so.
Page 24 - Indians use a medium-sized shaggy- dog, which is their substitute for mules. They drive great trains of them. Each, girt round its breast and haunches, and carrying a load of flour of at least one hundred pounds, travels as fast as his master. It is a sight worth seeing and very laughable to see them traveling, the ends of the poles dragging on the ground, nearly all of them snarling in their encounters, traveling one after another on their journey. In order to load them, the Indian women seize their...

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