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Lieutenant Governor Mac Donnell to Mr. Burnley.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

Halifar, N. S., January 24, 1865. SIR: I have not hitherto acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 22d ultimo, covering a communication from the honorable William H. Seward, giving information, on the authority of the United States consul here, of the existence of a piratical organization of some two hundred persons for seizing United States vessels on the Canadian lakes and elsewhere.

I have delayed acknowledging the above communication in the expectation that I might receive further information to give on the subject. I sent for the United States consul on receipt of your despatch, and assured him of the hearty co-operation of this government in every legal measure for the suppression of conspiracies here of the above nature.

I have since endeavored to ascertain whether there are really any parties in this city leagued together for such nefarious purposes as the consul has suggested, and I have hitherto failed to discover any adequate grounds for such a supposition.

You may, however, rely on my willing co-operation to discourage, and, so far as the law will permit, to prevent this part of her Majesty's dominions being made a rallying place for persons whose attempts are probably designed to place in jeopardy the friendly relations which at present happily exist between her Majesty's goverument and that of the United States. I have, &c.,

B. G. MACDONNELL,

Lieutenant Gorernor. J. H. BURNLEY, Esq., &c., &c., &c.

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, February 6, 1865. Sir: With reference to my note of the 8th of November last, and to your replies of the 14th and 16th of the same month, relative to a shipment of cotton from Memphis, belonging to a British subject, Captain Scanlan, I would beg to enclose a copy of a further letter and enclosure which I have received from this gentleman, requesting you to take it into consideration.

Captain Scanlan's statement is written very fairly and courteously, and I hope that as other parties have been allowed apparently to ship their entire crop to New York, the same favor may be extended to the present applicant.

I beg to enclose copies of contract with freedmen through the United States superintendent at Memphis, requesting you to return them to me.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. HUME BURNLEY. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Sc., fr., sc.

Mr. Scanlan to Mr. Burnley.

Willards' HOTEL,

Washington, D. C., February 3, 1865. SIR: With reference to my application to Lord Lyons of the 28th of October, 1864, I beg respectfully to submit that the order of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States has been complied with, only in permitting me to ship my crop of cotton to Memphis, to await further action, as has been stated in the permit of Mr. Orme, which I have shown you already, and a copy of which I enclose.

He construes the Secretary's letter as only waiving the clause in the affidavit heretofore referred to, but still not granting what I asked, and what he favorably recommended in his letter of October to the Secretary of the Treasury. He perunitted me to ship 24 bales of this cotton to New York, but refused to permit the balance, until the Secretary of the Treasury gives a more categorical answer to my application of last October, he being of opinion that the Secretary would require that the lands should be also leased from the government.

I have no doubt but the Secretary of the Treasury intended in his letter of the 14th of November that I should be permitted to ship this cotton to market. As stated in my letter to Lord Lyons, my plantation is eighteen miles below Memphis, on

the banks of the Mississippi river, and under cover of the guns of the United States nary. Were it not regarded by the military authorities as inside their lines, they would not permit me to take contrabands or freedmen from Memphis to said plantation.

I have been highly recommended by the military commanders of that department, and my case has been favorably referred to the supervising agent, Mr. Orme, who had before bim the proofs that this cotton was raised by freedmen's labor, and that every action of mine in the premises was strictly in conformity with the regulations of the treasury and in earnest furtherance of the policy of the government as set forth in the emancipation proclamation of his excellency the President of the United States ; I therefore ask that I be permitted to ship this cotton to New York, without further hindrance or embarrassment, as the delay already incurred has materially lessened its value:

Some neighboring planters who did not even hire their labor from the superintendent of freedmen have been permitted to ship their entire crop to New York, and I am, therefore, satisfied that when this is made known to the heads of departments here, they will exhibit in this case their usual fuirness and magnanimity, and I regret that I am obliged to give them further trouble.

I respectfully request the favor of an answer at your earliest convenience, directed to the care of Messrs. Walker & Scanlan, 224 F street. With sincere thanks for your kindness, I have the honor, sir, to be, with great respect,

W. E. SCANLAN. P. S.-I beg to enclose copies of contracts with freedmen through the United States superintendent at Memphis. Respectful y,

W. E. SCANLAN.

[Enclosure.]

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, SECOND AGENCY,

Memphis, Tennessee, December 29, 1864. W. E. Scanlan, a British subject, is hereby permitted to remove his crop of cotton, produced during the year 1864, from Scanlan's landing, eighteen miles below Memphis, to Memphis to be stored, and reported at this office for further action.

This is a case in which I am acting on special instructions from the Secretary of the Treasury, and I recommend the military authorities to give such passes as may be necessary in the case.

W. W. ORME, Supervising Special Agent.

[Enclosure.]

This contract, made this 12th day of March, 1864, between Captain W. E. Scanian, employer, and George Hall, Henry Cole, Anderson Manney, Paul McMillar, Greenville McMillar, Peter White, Jim Rogers, Bill Sykes, Arch. Gerring, William Noval, Ephraim Dennings, George Washington, freed laborers, witnesseth, that said W. E. Scanlan agrees to employ said laborers on his plantation from the 12th day of March, 1864, to the 12th day of March, 1865, on the terms specified in the code of rules and regulations for leasing abandoned property and hiring freedmen; and the said laborers agree to be diligent and faithful hands while in his employ, it being understood and agreed that this contract is subject to the provisions of said code by which all parties hereto agree to be governed.

W. E. SCANLAN.
GEORGE HALL,
HENRY COLE.
ANDERSON MANNEY.
PAUL MCMILLAR.
GREENVILLE MCMILLAR.
JIM ROGERS.
PETER WHITE,
GEORGE WASHINGTON.
BILL SYKES.
ARCH. GERRING.
WILLIAM NOVAL.

EPHRAIM DENNINGS.
In the presence of

R. D. BUD.

[Enclosure.]

This contract, made this 8th day of March, 1864, between W. E. Scanlan, employer, and Margaret Ingram, Charley Grear, Anna Gibbs and children, Clara Gibbs, Mira Gibbs, Rachel Gibbs, Susan Banks and child, Jane Hicks, Milly Tucker, Amanda Taylor, Ned Norris, Frances Julligan and child, Nancy Johnson and child, Abby Nance, Laura Hodge, Coledona Malone, Catharine Malone, Emma Holmes, Elijah Potts, freed laborers, witnessethf that said W. E. Scanlan agrees to employ said laborers on his plantation from the 8th day o, March, 1864, to the

day of

- 1864, on the terms prescribed in the code of rules and regulations for leasing abandoned property and hiring freedmen; and the said laborers agree to be diligent and faithful hands while in his employ, it being understood and agreed that this contract is subject to the provisions of said code by which all parties hereto agree to be governed.

W. E. SCANLAN.
SUSAN BANKS and child.
MILLY TUCKER.
JANE HICKS.
MARGARET INGRAHAM.
CHARLEY GREAR.
ANNA GIBBS and children.
LAURA GIBBS.
MARIA GIBBS.
RACHEL GIBBS.
AMANDA TAYLOR.
HENRY TAYLOR, Maryland,
NED NORRIS.
COLEDONA MALONE.
FRANCES JULLIGAN and child.
ABBY NANCE.
LAURA HODGE.
CATHARINE MALONE.
EMMA HOLMES.
ELIJAH POTTS.
JOHN LEWIS MALONE, Junistown, Tenn.
NANCY JOHNSON and child.
TILDA JOHNSON.
HENRY NANCE.

Rolly Spring, near Huntsville, Alabama.
In presence of
John PHILLIPS, Lieutenant Colonel,
Acting Sup't Freedmen, West Tennessee.

NOVEMBER, 1864. Permission is given to convey and land the within named employés as per the permits and documents accompanying this.

J. N. SIMONDS,
Inspector of Customs and Clearance Office for the Port of Memphis.

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, February 7, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 24th ultimo, relative to cotton claimed by British subjects and seized by the military authorities at Savannah.

In that note you do me the honor to observe that there exists no sufficient reason for departing, in this instance, from the course which this government pursues in securing property in the insurrectionary districts and ascertaining and liquidating any claims of lawful owners thereupon by judicial investigation, and I doubt not that such is the full intention of the United States government.

At the same time, in view of what Mr. Greene observes in his letter of the 19th ultimo, a copy of which I took occasion to lay before you in my note of the 30th ultimo, it would appear difficult, if not impossible, for the rightfu

owners to show their right and title to the property if, as this gentleman states' the military authorities of Savannah decline to give any receipt or record of the property they take away.

The good intentions of the American government would thus be rendered nugatory, unless, indeed, orders have been already given that a different course shall be adopted, and the owners be debarred by acts over which they had no control of bringing forward any claims which should allow this government the opportunity of fairly investigating them by judicial means. This, it appears to me, can only add to the perplexity of the question and lay the good faith of this government open to criticism.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. HUME BURNLEY. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, 8C., 80., 80.

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Seward.

WASHINGTON, February 7, 1865. Sir: With reference to your note of the 21st ultimo, relative to the hostile designs of certain persons in Canada on the towns of Burlington, in Vermont, and Whitehall, in New York, I have the honor to enclose a copy of a despatch which I have received in reply from his excellency the governor general of Canada.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. HUME BURNLEY. Hon. William H. SEWARD, 8c., &c., fr.

Viscount Monck to Mr. Burnley.

QUEBEC, January 31, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of January 25, enclosing a note from the Secretary of State of the United States, respecting the designs of the enemies of the United States lurking in Canada of making a formidable incursion on the town of Burlington, Vermont, and Whitehall, New York.

I have the honor to request you to convey to Mr. Seward my assurance that the government of Canada will use every exertion to detect and defeat such plans. I have, &c.,

MONCK. J. H. BURNLEY, Esq., &C., &c., &c.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF Srate,

Washington, February 7, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to enclose a copy of a telegram of yesterday from M M. Jackson, esq., the consul of the United States at Halifax, in regard to a projected raid from Canada into the United States. I will thank you to call the attention of the authorities of that province to the subject.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. J. Hume BURNLEY, Esq., fr., fc., fc.

Mr. Jackson to Mr. Seward,

OFFICE UNITED STATES TELEGRAPH,

War Department. The following telegram received at Washington, 12 m., February 7, 1865, from Halifax, February 6, 1865: Hon. WILLIAM H SEWARD :

Another raid into the United States from Canada is in contemplation; full particulars and instructions respecting which are given in several letters addressed to N. B. Davis, at Montreal and Toronto.

M. M. JACKSON, United States Consul.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Burnley.

DEPAR'IMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 8, 1865. Sir: I have had the honor to receive your communication of the 4th instant, relative to the extradition of Bennet G. Burley.

I have the honor to be, sir, with the highest consideration, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. J. HUME BURNLEY, Esq., fr., fr., &c.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 8, 1865. Sir: I have received the note which you addressed to me on the 30th ultimo, together with its accompaniment, namely, a copy of the letter of Mr. Charles Green, of Savannah. It does not seem to me to require any modification of the views I have hitherto had the honor to communicate to you concerning the property captured at that place.

I do not think that the officers of the United States ought to be required to give vouchers to claimants, or to permit them to brand or mark, or in any way to interfere with the captured property. This would be to make documentary or other evidence after the capture, in support of claims which are alleged to have existed before it.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. J. Hume BURNLEY, Esq., 8c., &c., &c.

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Seward.

Washington, February 8, 1865. Sir: With reference to my note of the 31st ultimo, enclosing copy of a despatch of the 21st ultimo, from the lieutenant governor of New Brunswick, relative to your requisition for the extradition of some of the St. Albans' raiders, supposed to be lurking in that province, I have the honor to inform you that I have since then received a further despatch from his excellency, in which he states that he was going to issue the warrant in question as soon as he had

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