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in his communication to you that this government.is aware of much hostility to the United States existing here, and of direct aid frequently given to enemies of the United States by Nova Scotians. I am, therefore, unwilling to appear by my silence to admit the correctness of such views. On the contrary, I feel assured that Mr. Seward will rejoice at finding reasonable grounds for modifying opinions prejudicial to the common interests both of the United States and this province. I have, &c.,

R. G. MACDONELL. J. HUME BURNLEY, Esq.

Mr. F. W. Seward to NIr. Burnley.

DepaRTMENT OF State,

Washington, April 7, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 3d instant, in regard to the detention at New York of Ernest W. Pratt, late the first officer, and Robert Green, the chief steward of the steamship City of Richmond, which cleared from the port of London on the 3d of January last, and near Belle Isle transferred to the insurgent iron-clad vessel Stonewall, alias Olinde, alias Stoerkodder, between sixty and seventy men, a number of cases said to have contained small-arms, and one hundred and fifty barrels of gunpowder. In reply, I have the honor to inform you that the matter has been referred to the Secretary of War for investigation and report, and I have written to the consul of the United States at Nassau, whose despatches heretofore received furnish no information in regard to the indorsements said to have been made by him in the discharge papers of Pratt and Green.

When replies shall have been received to these letters, the claims of the men to be released from custody will be taken into consideration. I have the honor to be, with high regard, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. By F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary. J. HUME BURNLEY, Esq., 8c., &c., &c.

Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF State,

Washington, April 8, 1865. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 1st instant, which is accompanied by a copy of a despatch addressed to you by his excellency the lieutenant governor of Bermuda, in response to the warnings of designs of the insurgents contemplating violations of the neutrality of British ports, contained in my communications to you of the 14th of January and 14th of February last, in regard, respectively, to the movements of the Ajax and the Shenandoah, or Sea King. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD,
By F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary. J. HUME BURNLEY, Esq., fr., Sc., gc.

Mr. F. W. Seward to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 8, 1865. SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 5th instant, in which, in conformity with instructions you have received from her Majesty's government, you express a hope that no obstacle will be interposed to prevent British subjects from establishing their just claim to that portion of the cotton captured at Savannah alleged to be their property. In reply, I have the honor to state that, so far from desiring any interposition of the character referred to, the United States government has sought to give to all such claims as full a hearing and as just a consideration as, under similar circumstances, they would expect to be accorded to like claims of its own citizens. I have the honor to be, with high consideration, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD,
By F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary. J. Hume BURNLEY, Esq., 80., 8., c.

Sir F. Bruce to Mr. Seward.

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[Extract.)

WASHINGTON, April 10, 1865. SIR: I have the honor to announce to you my arrival at Washington, charged with a letter from her Britannic Majesty, accrediting me to the President of the United States as her Majesty's envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary.

And I shall feel much obliged if you will take the orders of the President with reference to grauting me an audience, at which I may have the honor of delivering to him the royal letter in original.

I trust, sir, that your late accident, which I sincerely regret, may not deprive me for any lengthened period of the satisfaction of entering into personal communication with yourself.

I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

FREDERICK W. A. BRUCE. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, fc., fc., fc.

Mr. Hunter to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF State,

Washington, April 15, 1865. SIR: It is my great misfortune to be obliged to inform you of events not less afilicting to the people of the United States than distressing to my own feelings and the feelings of all those connected with the government. The President of the United States was shot with a pistol last night, while attending a theatre in this city, and expired this morning from the effect of the wound.

At about the same time, an attempt was made to assassinate the Secretary of State, which, though it fortunately failed, left him severely, but it is hoped not dangerously wounded, with a knife or dagger.

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Mr. F. W. Seward was also struck on the head with a heavy weapon, and is in a critical condition from the effect of the blows.

Pursuant to the provision of the Constitution of the United States, Andrew Johnson, the Vice-President, has formally assumed the functions of President. I have by him been authorized to perform the duties of Secretary of State, until otherwise ordered.

I avail myself of the occasion to offer to you the assurance of my very distinguished consideration.

W. HUNTER, Acting Secretary. J. Hume BURNLEY, Esq., St., Sc., gc. [Same, mutatis mutandis, to all foreign ministers in the United States.)

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Hunter.

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WASHINGTON, April 17, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 15th instant, announcing to me the lamented death of the President of the United States on the night of the 14th instant, from the effects of a pistol-shot received at the hands of an assassin, whilst attending the performances at the theatre, and the dastardly attempt to assassinate in like manner the Secretary of State, and his son Mr. F. Seward.

It is with feelings of the deepest regret that I have heard of these crimes, a regret which will be shared by my government on reception of the sad news. I sincerely trust that Mr. Seward and his son may recover from the wounds inflicted on them and be restored to health.

I take this opportunity of acknowledging the announcement of the formal assumption of the functions of President by the late Vice-President, Andrew Johnson, and of your appointment to perform temporarily the duties of Secretary of State.

I have the honor to be, with high consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. HUME BURNLEY. Hon. W. HUNTER, St., fr., $c.

Mr. Hunter to Mr. Burnley.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 18, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to enclose a programme of arrangements for the obse quies of the late President. The religious services will take place at the Executive Mansion at twelve o'clock m. to-morrow. Your attendance at about halfpast eleven is invited. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, your obedient servant,

W. HUNTER,

Acting Secretary. J. HUME BURNLEY, Esq., Sc., Sc., $c. Sme, mutatis mutanlis, to all foreni ters in the United States.]

ORDER OF THE PROCESSION.

Funeral escort in column of march.
One regiment of cavalry.
Two batteries of artillery.

Battalion of marines.
Two regiments of infantry.

Commander of escort and staff.
Dismounted officers of marine corps.
Navy and army in the order named.

Mounted officers of marine corps.

Navy and army in the order named.
All military officers to be in uniform, with side-arms.

CIVIC PROCESSION.

Marshal.

Clergy in attendance.
The Surgeon General of the United States and physicians to the deceased.

Pall-bearers.

Hearse.

Pall-bearers.

On the part of the Senate.
Mr. Foster, Connecticut.
Mr. Morgan, New York.
Mr. Johnson, Maryland.
Mr. Yates, Illinois.
Mr. Wade, Ohio.
Mr. Conness, California.

On the part of the House.
Mr. Dawes, Massachusetts.
Mr. Coffroth, Pennsylvania.
Mr. Smith, Kentucky.
Mr. Colfax, Indiana.
Mr. Worthington, Nevada.
Mr. Washburne, Illinois.

Army.

Naty. Lieutenant General U. S. Grant.

Vice-Admiral D. G. Farragut. Major General H, W. Halleck.

Rear-Admiral W. B. Shubrick. Brevet Brigadier General W. A. Nichols. Colonel Jacob Zeilin, M. C. Civilians.

Civilians. 0. H. Browning

Thomas Corwin.
George Ashmun.

Simon Cameron.
The family.

Relatives.
The delegations of the States of Illinois and Kentucky as mourners.

The President.
The cabinet ministers.

The diplomatic corps.

Ex-Presidents.
The Chief Justice and associate justices of Supreme Court.

The Senate of the United States, preceded by its officers.
The House of Representatives of the United States, preceded by its officers.

Legislatures of the several States and Territories.
The federal judiciary and the judiciary of the several States and Territories.
The Assistant Secretaries of State, Treasury, War, Navy, and Interior, and the Assistant

Postmasters General and Assistant Attorney General.

Officers of Smithsonian Institution.
The members and officers of the Sanitary and Christian Commissions.
Corporate authorities of Washington and Georgetown and other cities.

Delegations of the several States.

The reverend clergy of the various denominations. The clerks and employés of the several departments and burcans, preceded by the heads or

sich bureaus aucili ir reinptive clief plek. Sutli sucitti Dit wisi to je bila prehisivil.

Citizens and strangers.

The troops designated to form the escort will assemble in the avenue, north of the Presi. dent's house, and form line precisely at 11 o'clock 8. m., on Wednesday, the 19th instant, with the left resting on Fifteenth street. The procession will move precisely at 2 o'clock p. m., on the conclusion of the religious services at the Executive Mansion, (appointed to commence at 12 o'clock meridian,) when minute-guns will be fired by detachments of artillery stationed near St. John's church, the City Hall, and at the Capitol. At the same hour the bells of the several churches in Washington, Georgetown, and Alexandria will be tolled.

At sunrise on Wednesday, the 19th instant, a federal salute will be fired from the military stations in the vicinity of Washington, minute-guns between the hours of twelve and three o'clock, and a national salute at the setting of the sun.

The usual badge of mourning will be worn on the left arm and on the hilt of the sword.

Mr. Burnley to Mr. Hunter.

WASHINGTON, April 18, 1865. Sir: With reference to Mr. Seward's note of the 6th ultimo, asking for the extradition of Vernon G. Locke, I have the honor to enclose copy of a despatch which I have received from his excellency the governor of the Bahamas in reply to my despatch communicating to him copy of the above-mentioned note.

I have the honor to be, with high consideration, sir, your most obedient, humble servant,

J. HUME BURNLEY. Hon. WILLIAM HUNTER, &c., $c., &c.

Governor Rawson to Mr. Burnley.

GOVERNMENT House,

Nassau, April 3, 1865. Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge your despatch of the 9th ultimo, transmitting a copy of a note from the Secretary of State for the United States, requesting the extradition of Vernon (or Verdon) G. Locke, charged with the commission of the crimes of piracy and murder on board the United States merchant steamer Chesapeake, and a fugitive from the justice of the United States.

This man is now under arrest at Nassau, and will be brought to trial at the ensuing sitting of the general court, for the fraudulent sale of the captured United States schooner Hanover, being an offence committed in her Majesty's dominions against British law.

Under such circumstances, it appears to me that I should not be justified in delivering him over to the authorities of the United States, to be tried by them for another offence, until he shall either have been acquitted of the first offence, or, if condemned on the trial for it, shall have undergone and completed his sentence.

As, however, bis trial will take place so soon, the question of his acquittal or condemnation will not long be at issue. If he should be acquitted, I shall be prepared to act upon a requisition presented to me conformably with the provisions of the 10th article of the treaty of Washington, to which Mr. Seward refers. If he should be condemned, he will remain in confinement here, and I will refer the question of extradition to the secretary of state for the instructions of her Majesty's government.

I request, however, that you will lose no time in pointing out to Mr. Seward that his note does not contain, and that this government does not possess, any evidence or information upon which I can legally comply with his present requisition. The 10th article of the treaty of Washington stipulates that extradition is to be made “upon such evidence of criminality as, according to the laws of the place where the fugitive or person so charged shall be found, would justify his apprehension and commitment for trial, if the crime or offence had there been committed;" that the primary arrest must be made "upon complaint made under oath;" that the person charged is to be brought before a competent court, "to the end that the evidence of criminality may be heard and considered," and that I have only the power of sur. rendering the fugitive if, on such hearing, “the evidence be deemed sufficient to sustain the charge," in the judgment "of the examining judge or magistrate."

It will be necessary, therefore, for the government of the United States to supply such evidence of the nature and circumstances of the alleged crimes, of the identity of Locke, and of his participaiton in the commission of the said crimes, as will satisfy the usual requirements of the colonial laws.

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