Robert E. Lee, the Southerner

Front Cover
C. Scribner's sons, 1908 - Generals - 312 pages

From inside the book

Contents

I
ix
II
3
III
13
IV
30
V
57
VI
71
VII
84
VIII
96
XII
174
XIII
204
XIV
213
XV
237
XVI
253
XVII
261
XVIII
269
XIX
284

IX
109
X
122
XI
153

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Page 284 - Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea." BOSWELL. " Lord Mansfield does not." JOHNSON. " Sir, if lord Mansfield were in a company of general officers and admirals who have been in service, he would shrink ; he'd wish to creep under the table.
Page 258 - And from the heights the thunder pealed. Then at the brief command of Lee Moved out that matchless infantry, With Pickett leading grandly down, To rush against the roaring crown Of those dread heights of destiny. Far heard above the angry guns A cry across the tumult runs, — The voice that rang through Shiloh's woods And Chickamauga's solitudes, The fierce South cheering on her sons ! Ah, how the withering tempest blew Against the front of Pettigrew!
Page 28 - Duty, then, is the sublimest word in our language. Do your duty in all things, like that old Puritan. You cannot do more; you should never wish to do less.
Page 73 - Trusting in Almighty God, an approving conscience, and the aid of my fellow-citizens, I devote myself to the service of my native State, in whose behalf alone will I ever again draw my sword.
Page 43 - I can anticipate no greater calamity for the country than a dissolution of the Union. It would be an accumulation of all the evils we complain of, and I am willing to sacrifice everything but honor for its preservation.
Page 200 - To ask me to substitute you by some one in my judgment more fit to command, or who would possess more of the confidence of the army, or of the reflecting men of the country, is to demand an impossibility.
Page 137 - ... to resume the conflict on the same ground, and retired next morning without molestation across the Potomac. Two attempts subsequently made by the enemy to follow you across the river have resulted in his complete discomfiture and being driven back with loss. Achievements such as these demanded much valor and patriotism. History records few examples of greater fortitude and endurance than this army has exhibited...
Page 166 - Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation.
Page 72 - Yesterday, your mother, Virginia, placed her sword in your hand, upon the implied condition that we know you will keep to the letter and in spirit, that you will draw it only in her defence, and that you will fall with it in your hand rather than the object for which it was placed there shall fail.
Page 172 - II, p. 194. better performed the arduous marches of the past ten days. Their conduct in other respects has, with few exceptions, been in keeping with their character as soldiers and entitles them to approbation and praise. There have, however, been instances of forgetfulness on the part of some that they have in keeping the yet unsullied reputation of the army...

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