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Vaudreuil, succeeds Du Quesne in Can. a free state (1781), not allowed, 408;

ada, ii. 420; gives up Quebec, 512; special provision for admission of, into

surrenders Montreal (1760), 523. the union (1787), vi. 324.
Vaughan, Robert, on Kent Island, Mary- | Vernon, Edward, admiral, captures Por-

land, i. 167 ; obtains, for the legisla to Bello and Fort Chagre, ii. 295,

ture of Maryland, two branches, 169. 296; attack of, on Carthagena, 296 ;
Vaughan, William, at Louisburg, ii. 307; ill success of, and loss, 296, 297.

storms and takes Fort Clinton on the Verplanck's Point, New York, surren-

Ilud 3on, burns Kingston, etc., v. 186. dered to the British, v. 329.
Venango, near Fort Pitt, destroyed by Vincennes, a Canadian hero, ii. 236;

the Indians in Pontiac's war, iii. 45. death of, 236.
Vergennes, Count de, opinion of, as to Vincennes, the oldest village in Indi-

cession of Canada to Enzland (1763), ana, ii. 186; post at, 225 ; increase
ii. 564, 565; foreign minister under of (1769), iii. 319; how treated, 409;
Louis XVI., iv. 40; character of, 40, people of, join the United States
41; views of, 97, 98; views sent to, (1778), v. 311, 312; fort at, taken by
by Garnier, in London, 109; forecast IIamilton, 312; retaken by Clark and
ing3 of, 190; admires Virginia's state the backwoodsmen, 313, 314.
paper, 203 ; on the battle of Bunker Virginia, the name given by Queen Eliza-
Hill, 260; on King George's procla beth, i. 69; first colony of, 85; first
mation (1775), 271; views of, as to charter of, 85, 86; King James's in.
English affairs, 280; on the course of terest in, 86 ; provisions of the char-
the English government, 283, 284; ter, 86, 87; colonists arrive in, 88;
presentiments of, 359, 36); in favor second colony of, 90); failure of the
of aiding the Americans, 363 ; "con colony, 91; first colony's sufferings,
siderations,” laid before Louis XVI., 91, 92; dissensions in, 92; John
364-366 ; advice to the king in coun Smith's administration, 92-96 ; sec-
cil, v. 16, 17; paper of, on the course ond charter, 99; adventurers under,
for France to pursuc toward the 99; provisions of charter, 100; sad
United States, 18-20; on Washing. state of affairs in, 100, 101; restora.
ton's retreat through New Jersey, 94; tion of the colony, 101, 102; martial
interview with Franklin, 127; meets law in, 102, 103; treatment of the
the American commissioners, 128 ; Indians, 104; Spaniards jealous of,
policy of, toward England, 132-134; 104; the third charter, its important
insists on Spain deciding to join or provisions, 104, 105; stability of the
not to join, 139; arranges treaty be colony, 105; Dale's administration,
tween France and the United States, 107; tenure of lands in, 107; Argall
244, 245 ; on subluing the Ameri. in charge of, 109, 110; Yeardley gov.
cans, 281; active interest of, in Ameri-

ernor, 108, 110-113; Sir E. Sandys
can affairs, 320-326 ; sends an agent treasurer, Ferrar counsel, 111, 112;
to Ireland, 341 ; suggests a league of emigration of unmarried women to,
neutral nations, 316 ; letter of, to Gc 115, 116.
rard, 410, 441; intercourse of, with First colonial assembly, acts of, i.
Oswald and Grenville, 637-640; de 112, 113 ; ordinance securing the lib-
clines Grenville's proposal, 512 ; views erties of Virginia, 117; Wyatt brings
of, on Oswald's commission, 551, 552; free constitution, 118; conditional
schemes and wishes of, as to the prog servitude in, 125 ; negro slavery in,
ress of the United States, 562, 563 ; 126; Wyatt's administration, 126,
opens direct negotiations with Shel 127; cotton planted, silk culture at-
burne, 565 ; letter of, to the French tempted, ctc., 126 ; religious teaching
envoy at Philadelphia, 572, 573; mod. in, 127; troubles of, with the red

eration of, in making peace, vi. 36. men, whites massacred, 127, 128;
Vermont, the territory in dispute (1750), war for extermination, 128, 129.

ii. 361; proposal to annex to New King James and the London Com-
York, iii. 55 ; unjustly treated, 87; pany, i. 129, 130; the order to give up
disturbance in, and result, iv, 142, 143; the charter refused, 131 ; commission-
refuses jurisdiction of New York and ers sent to Virginia, 131, 132; spirit of
declares independence (1777), v. 157; the people, 132; the assembly's acts
convention meets and frames consti of legislation, 132, 133; patents can-
tution, adopts laws, etc., 161, 162; celled, 133 ; Wyatt governor, 133,
asks for admission into the union as 134; Charles I. and Virginia, 135;

Yeardley governor, 136; Harvey suc-
cecds, 136, 137; the Puritans invited
to Virginia, 136; Ilarvey impeached,
sustained by privy council, 138, 139;
Wyatt governor, 139; Berkeley's ad-
ministration, 1:39, 140; course of the
legislature, 140, 141; second massa-
cre by Indians, 142; prosperity and
loyalty of, 143.

The Long Parliament asserts its su-
premacy in, i. 143 ; change in Eng-
land's commercial policy, 144-146;
Virginia yields to pressure, etc., 146,
147; course pursued by Cromwell to-
ward, 148; the assembly claims its
rights, 148, 149 ; Berkeley again
elected, 150; inhabitants of, 150,
151; religious liberty for all except
Quakers, 151; climate and native at-
tractions of, 151; mode of living,
hospitality, etc., 152, 153.

The colony badly used by Charles
II., i. 365, 452; people of, elections,
aristocracy, democracy, etc., 442, 443;
servants in, 443; negro slaves, 444;
two parties in, 4-15; royalist assembly
in, 446; navigation acts oppressive,
446, 447; persecutions in, 448; reve-
nue of, 449 ; salaries, taxation in, 44);
assembly's action, suffrage in, 451;
means of education, 451; Virginia
given away by Charles II., 452, 453;
agents sent to protest against this,
453; the king orders a charter, but
recalls the order, 454; the colony in
1674, 455 ; reform movements in, 456,
457; contests with the Indians, 457,
458; Berkeley's course, consequences,
458; the new assembly and its acts,
460,461; Bacon's rebellion, 461-464 ;
Jamestown burned, 466 ; rebels and
others from abroad sent to Virginia,
471, 472 ; despotic measures resisted,
473, 474 ; movements for union with
New England colonies, 474.

Form of government, burgesses,
etc. (1689), ii. 17; the church and
people, 18-20; disfranchises negroes,
mulattoes, and Indians, 256, 257; op-
poses the slave-trade, 279, 280; inde-
pendent spirit of, 341 ; condition of
(1754), 393, 394; slavery in, 394 ;
supplies troops for Forbes's expedi.
tion, 493; opposes the slave-trade,
649; address of, to the king, iii. 92 ;
memorial to the lords, 93; remon-
strance to the commons, 93 ; resolve
of, as to the stamp-act, 110 ; debate
on Patrick Henry's resolutions, 111,
112 ; “rang the alarum bell” (1705),
112; the assembly not allowed to

meet, 120; votes a statue to King
George, 213; opposes the slave-trade,
248 ; the assembly approves of course
of Massachusetts, 285; urges on the
other colonies to hold liberty firm,
285, 286 ; claim of, to the West, 320;
opposes Stuart and the Cherokce line,
$20,321 ; western boundary question,
322; resolves of, and circular, 347,
348; the governor dissolves the house,
318; non-importation covenant in,
318-350; the western boundary of,
392; Lord Dunmore governor, 396 ;
protests against the slave-trade, 409,
410; the king orders continuance of
the trade, 410; address of, to the
king, 411; proposes intercolonial
committees, 436, 437; effect of the
proposition, 437.

Spirit of the house of burgesses
(1774), iv. 16, 17; day of fasting and
prayer appointed, 17; the house dis-
solved, meets directly after, 17; con-
vention called, 18; backwoodsmen of,
help Boston, 29, 30; convention of,
34; denounces slavery, 34; decision
reached, 35, 36; opposes the Quebec
act, 82; Lord Dunmore governor,
82; disobeys the act, 83; the people
in West Virginia assert American
rights, 83, 89; Presbyterian resolve
in council, 100, 101 ; the assembly
prorogued, 108; spirit of West Vir-
ginia, 131; conservative character of,
dislikes prospect of war, 144 ; second
convention and its acts, 144; P.
Henry proposes measures of defence,
144, 145; is opposed by Bland, Har-
rison, and others, 145; measures
adopted, 145; the people threaten to
rise against Dunmore, 146; moderat.
ing counsels prevail, 147; rising in,
Dunmore's course, 179, 180; conven-
tion in Richmond, clear and judicious
course, 254 ; money voted, 255; war
is begun by Dunmore, 317; effect of
burning Norfolk, 321 ; moves to open
the ports of the colonies for free
trade, 321; house of burgesses meets
and dissolves, 412; constituent con-
vention (May, 1776), 412; the people
unanimous, 413; instructions to dele-
gates, 414; E. Pendleton president,
414; resolutions on independence and
confederation, 415; declaration of
rights, 416; quoted, 417-419; form
of government adopted, 426 ; gover-
nor, privy council, general assembly
in two branches, 427; Patrick Henry
elected governor, 428.

Declaration of independence re-

ceived (1776), v. 6; the claim on the Wadsworth, Captain Joseph, and the
north-western territory, 14; disestab charter of Connecticut, i. 588.
lishes the church, 123 ; prosperity of, Wainwright, Simon, of Haverhill

, Massa.
327; raid into, under Matthew, 327, chusetts, killed by the Indians, ii.
328; action of the legislature on con 197.
fiscation, poll tax, constitution of Walcott, of the British army, v. 145; on
government, etc. (1779), 323, 329 ; treating with congress, 146.
forbids the slave-trade, 329; gener. Waldeck, prince of, offers England six
ous help of, for Carolina, 383, 334 ; hundred mercenaries, iv. 350.
antagonism toward New England, Waldenses, in New Netherland, i. 512.
407; permits emancipation, not aboli. Waldron, R., murdered by the Indians,
tion, 410; receives help from France, ii. 178, 179.
441; asserts state sovereignty, 441, Walker, Henderson, governor of North
442; patriotic offers for the union, Carolina, ii. 14.
453, 454; repeals grant of impost, Walker, Sir H., ii. 200; fleet of, wrecked
vi. 63; effect of Washington's letter in the St. Lawrence, 202.
(1783), 95, 96; views of (1784), 111; Walpole, Horatio, auditor - general, ii.
disestablishes the church, 155 ; course 239, 243; receives money illegally,
of, on the paper-money question, 173– 256; advises coercion of the colonies,
175; hesitates as to giving congress 347; on Townshend's instructions,
power over trade, 184, 185; commis. 376.
sioners of, to convention at Annapo- Walpole, Sir Robert, prime minister of
lis, Maryland, 185; unanimous action England (1715), ii. 213, 214; charac-
of the assembly, 197, 198; Virginia ter of, 240, 241; on taxing the colo-
statesmen against slavery, 262; ac nies, 251 ; opposes war against Spain,
cepts the ordinance for western lands, 293, 294; resigns, 295; views on
with exclusion of slavery, 290, 291 ; stamp-act and revenue, iii. 58, 70.
the rights of free negroes in, 291; Walton, George, delegate to congress
the legislature discusses and acts on (1776), iv. 391.
the new constitution, 377-379; views Wanton, governor of Rhode Island, calls
as to the Mississippi river, and rights, an assembly, iv. 171.
423; state convention on the federal Ward, Artemas, appointed general, iv.
constitution meets, 426; long and 121; at Cambridge, 173; in command
earnest dcbates, strong men on both around Boston, 209; fears a general
sides, 426-434; the convention re action, 219; sends Stark to Prescott's
fuses conditional ratification, 436; help, 220, 221; dilatory, 223; general
the constitution ratified, 436; the op orders after the battle of Bunker Hill,
position acquiesces, 436, 437; the

elected by congress major-gen-
legislature calls for a second federal eral, 232; with the centre of the army,
convention, 465.

240; in command of a division at
Voltaire, and Frederic of Prussia, ii. Cambridge, 247.

478, 479; predicts revolution, iii. 75; | Ward, Nathaniel, furnishes "model"
letter of, to D'Alembert, 229; on for code of laws in Massachusetts, i.
representative government, iv. 369; 282,
friendship of, for America, v. 247; Warner, Seth, takes Crown Point, iv.
renders homage to Lafayette, 247; 183; lieutenant-colonel of the Green
scene in the French Academy with Mountain Boys, 292; attack of, on the
Franklin, 256.

British, 296; at Hubbardton, v. 162;
Vries, De. See De Vries.

retreats, 162, 163; in the battle at
Bennington, Vermont, 172.
Warren, James, speaker of the Massa-

chusetts legislature, iv. 242; Wash-
W.

ington's appeal to, v. 318.

Warren, Joseph, “ freedom and equali.
Wabash river, expedition to, v. 310. ty," the new war cry of, iii. 207; in
Waddel, in command against the “regu. the Massachusetts assembly, 217; let-

lators" in Carolina, iii. 400, 401. ter on Bernard, 278; on committee
Wadsworth, James, of Connecticut, in with Samuel Adams, prepares a state-

congress, vi. 113; in the state conven ment of grievances, 421; spirit of, iv.
tion, opposes the new constitution, 23; ou county congress, 52; fearless,
394, 395; result, 395.

60; hopeful words of, 90; opinions

231;

of, 122 ; oration of, at commemora-
tion of the Boston massacre, 133,
134; at the British retreat from Con-
cord, 165, 166; deprecates war, 184 ;
noble spirit of, 200; letter to Samuel
Adams, 203; falls at Bunker Hill,

230; character of, 230, 231.
Warren, Sir Peter, admiral, in the expe-

dition against Louisburg, ii. 308, 309.
Washington, George, early life and

training, ii. 312, 313; envoy to the
French on the Ohio, 378, 379; reaches
Fort Le Bæuf, 380; toilsome return,
380, 381; lieutenant-colonel, for act-
ive service against the French, 381;
fight with the French under Jumon-
ville, 384, 385; at Great Meadows,
capitulates, 385; gives up service
through disgust at Braddock's course,
412; one of Braddock's aids, 420;
share in the battle at Braddock's de-
feat, 423, 424; sympathy and self-
sacrifice, 444, 445; praised, but neg.
lected, 451; in the expedition under
Forbes (1758), 493; commands the
advance party, 494, 495; enters Fort
Duquesne, 495 ; honor and praise be-
stowed on, elected a burgess, 497;
marriage of, 497; at Mount Vernon,
497; opinion of, as to the stamp-act,
iii. 146 ; on the repeal of the stamp-
act, 213; views of (1768), 283; at
Mount Vernon, sentiments and course
of, 344; plan of, for non-importation,
348; on the Ohio, 393.

Spirit and course of (1774), iv. 17,
18; subscription for help, president
of Fairfax county convention, 29 ;
opinions of, 34, 35, 143; in congress,
64; letter to British officer, 72;
Patrick Henry's opinion of, 78; dele-
gate to the second congress, 190;
opinions of, 199; elected commander-
in-chief by congress, iv, 205; charac-
ter of, training, noble qualities, etc.,
205-210; knowing the difficulties be-
fore him, accepts, 211; pledge to con-
gress, 211, 212; letter to his wife,
212, 235 ; leaves Philadelphia for the
army, 235; letter to his brother,
236; reception of, in New York and
New England, 236, 237; takes com-
mand of the army, 239; begins with
reforms, 240; report of, to congress,
243; trying duties, 247; remonstrates
with Gage, 249; vexations encoun.
tered, 250; insists upon an exami-
nation into the state of the army,
262; committee of congress visit him
and devise plan of relief, 262; sends
two battalions overland to Canada

under Benedict Arnold, 297, 298;
asks the Canadians to join the Ameri-
cans, 298; in favor of declaring inde.
pendence, 315; on the destruction of
Norfolk, Virginia, 321; difficulties
and troubles with army matters, 321,
322; enlists free negroes, 322, 323;
lack of money, arms, etc., 323; letter
reproving congress as to attack on
Boston, 323, 324 ; fortifies Dorches-
ter Heights and Nook Hill, 326, 327,
329; drives the British out of Boston,
329, 330; thanks received from con-
gress and people of Boston, 330, 331;
sends troops to New York, 330; goes
to New York, 376; how served by
congress, 377; views as to the con.
test with England, 419.

Badly off for troops (June, 1776), iv.
430; deadly plot against, in New
York, 430, 431; letter to congress on
the condition of the army, 436, 437;
letter on Howe's arrival at Sandy
Hook, 441; on the riot in New York
city, v. 4, 5; refuses letters which are
not properly addressed, 7, 8; views
of, 8; letter to Governor Trumbull,
25; pain at the loss of troops, 32;
inspects the works, 34; resolves to
cross the river to New York, 35; se-
crecy and success of the movement,
36–38; urges enlistments for the war,
39, 40; letter to congress, 42; activi.
ty in retreat from New York, 44-47;
pleads for an army, 51; unbeeded by
congress, 52; on Harlem Heights and
vicinity, 65, 66; deplores the inac-
tivity and wilfulness of congress, 68,
69; begins to evacuate New York
Island, 69, 70; sends corps to White
Plains, 70; holds council of war, 70;
advises giving up Fort Washington,
75; examines the Highlands on the
Hudson, 76 ; grieves over the loss of
Fort Washington and vicinity, 80;
troubles and trials of, 81, 82; at New-
ark, New Jersey, 82; orders of, to C.
Lee disobeyed, 81-84 ; at Brunswick,
83; at Princeton, 64; prevents the
British from crossing the Delaware,
85; is the main hope of the United
States, 87.

Plans attack on the enemy (Decem-
ber, 1776), v. 90; urges congress to
raise troops, 91, 92 ; crosses the Dela-
ware, 97; success of, at Trenton, 98,
99; is authorized to raise troops, 100,
101; extraordinary powers granted to,
101; pledges his fortune, 102; at As-
sanpink, 103, 104; retreats at night
to Princeton, 105, 106; plans to take

Brunswick, 107; headquarters at Mor-
ristown, 108 ; proclamation of, 109;
cavilled at in congress, 110; highly
esteemed by R. Morris and others, 109,
110; number of troops in New Jersey,
148; recommends drafting, 148, 149;
watches the enemy, Fabian policy suc-
cessful, 153, 154; sends Arnold and
Lincoln to Schuyler's help, 166; let-
ters to New England officers, 166; on
Burgoyne's advance, 167; rouses Mas-
sachusetts troops, 173 ; strives for a
national army, 174 ; marches to Wil-
mington, Delaware, 175, 176; positions
taken, 176 ; battle of the Brandywine,
177-179; at Chester, report to con-
gress, 179; movement blamed by John
Adams, 180, 181; sends for Morgan's
corps, 181; Gates does not respond,
197; proposes to move on German-
town, 193; cause of failure at Ger-
mantown, 194, 195; gets news of
Burgoyne's surrender, 195; jealousy
of congress toward, 197; refuses the
"mad enterprise" of attacking Phila-
delphia, 209; at Whitemarsb, 209;
number of troops, 210; disapproves
Conway's promotion, 210; interview
with Conway, 211; abused by Reed,
Lovell, etc., 211; pities the troops in
winter quarters (1777, 1778), 213;
blames Mifflin, 213; makes entreaties
for the soldiers, 214 ; letter to Gordon,
216; dignified course of, 216, 217;
letter from Conway, 216, 217; plan
of, for drafting troops, 218, 219; dis-
approves new staff regulations, 219,
220; differs with congress, 220, 221;
letter of, on a standing army (1778),
221.

Opinion of, on propositions of the
British commissioners, v. 255, 256;
attacks Clinton on retreat through
New Jersey, 274–277; gains a victory
at Monmouth, 276–278; at White
Plains, 286; the hand of Providence
recognized, 286, 287; on the state-
rights difficulty, etc., 298 ; in Phila-
delphia (1779), 317; letters on efficient
government, 318, 319; interview with
Gerard, 319, 320; on enlisting slaves
in the South, 370; at Morristown, 423;
meets committee of congress, 424,
425 ; has a meeting with the French
officers, 432; appeals to Reed, 443;
letter to J. Jones, of Georgia, on in-
efficiency of congress, 444 ; letter to
George Mason on distress and rem-
edy, 449, 450; appeals to France
for help, 452; to R. R. Livingston,
453; begs that congress have coer.

cive powers, 455–457; in full control
at last, 477; letter commending Gen.
eral Greene, 478; orders Steuben to
aid Greene, 495 ; plans Virginia cam-
paign, 505, 506; arranges with the
French officers, 508, 509; begs troops
of New England, 509; at Mount Ver.
non, 517; has conference with De
Grasse, 518; receives thanks of con.
gress, 523; demands Lippincot, 555;
makes request to Carleton, 555; re-
ply of, to Nicola's letter, 558; on the
sufferings of the army, 561; appeal
to Virginia statesmen for efficient
government, vi. 16, 17; advice to
Custis and to Jones, 18, 19; opinions
of, on the crisis, 60; appeals to the
governor of Virginia, 70; reply to
anonymous address, 71; meets officers
of the army, 73; result of his action,
70 ; letter to Hamilton, 76, 77; ad.
dress of, to his countrymen, legacy to
the people, energy of patriotism, 83-
86; letter, how received in the states,
90-97; takes a northern tour, 101,
102; statue voted to, by congress, 102;
adviser to congress at Princeton, New
Jersey, 102, 103; address of, to the
army, 105; parts with the officers,
106; journey through New Jersey,
107; through Philadelphia, 107; re-
signs his commission, 108 ; returns
to Mount Vernon, 109; on commerce
with the West, 114; honors decreed
to, by Virginia, 114; pleads for a
national constitution in letter to Llar.
rison, 115 ; tour of, in the West, 125;
report to Governor Harrison, 126 ;
negotiates between Virginia and Mary.
land, 127, 128; western policy of,
130, 131; inflexible against breach of
public faith, 174; in private life, 177;
invited to visit France, 177, 178 ;
home of, lands, negroes, etc., 178,
180; hatred of, for war, 181; enjoins
moderation on Lafayette at beginning
of French revolution, 182 ; meeting of
commissioners at his house, 182, 183;
on the importance of the union to the
republic, 184.

Is chosen delegate to the federal
convention, vi. 198; makes prepara-
tion for, 203; goes to Philadelphia,
208; chosen president of the conven-
tion, 211; influence of, in the conven-
tion, 276; praises colony in Ohio,
290; proposes amendment to the con-
stitution, 366 ; meditations on the
result, 367; efforts of, in Virginia in
favor of the constitution, 375, 376;
wins over Randolph, 377; hope and

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