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168, 169; laws of other states on the
subject, 169-173 ; public opinion on
this sort of money, 175, 176; the

states prohibited issuing, 303-305.
Papists, in Maryland, i. 172.
Parker, John, captain at Lexington, iv.

154.
Parker, Moses, taken prisoner, and dies

in Boston jail, iv. 230.
Parker, Sir Peter, in command of Brit-

ish fleet against Charleston, South
Carolina, arrives in Cape Fear river,
iv. 397; begins attack on Fort Moul-
trie, 404; ships of, aground, 406 ;
terrible fire on flagsbip of, 407; re-
treats, 408, 409; crimination and re-
crimination with Clinton, 409; at

New York, v. 31.
Parliament, first act of, relating to

America, i. 61; favors the Puritans,
197; condemns monopoly of the
Plymouth company, 217; supremacy
of, over the colonies, 352; absolute
in 1688, 601; ii. 6; attitude toward
the colonies, 70; notes the growth of
republican spirit in America, 70, 71;
scheme of, to govern by prerogative,
72, 73; appoints a board of trade,
73; plan for placing the colonies
under a military dictatorship, 73, 74;
taxation by, 75, 76; prerogative and
veto powers, 76; judiciary in the
colonies, habeas corpus, the press,
etc., in relation to the crown and par.
liament, 76, 77; threatens all the
charters, 77; colonics refuse the
quota plan, 78; mercantile system
developed and sustained, 79, 80;
courts of admiralty established, and
laws against manufactures in the
colonies, 80, 81; opposition to this
tyrannous policy, 81, 82; defines pi.
racy and its punishment, 83; regu-
lates the currency, 83 ; offers bounty
on naval stores, 84; as to the right
to tax the colonies, 84, 251; favors
the islands above the colonies, 242-
244; act of, for naturalization in
America, 264; is held to be supreme
over the colonies, 338, 339; plan for
taxing the colonies, 382, 383; is
asked to tax the colonics, 411; dis-
cussion as to tasing America, 418.

Bill taxing America passed, iii. 73 ;
stamp-act debated and passed, 97-
104; petitions to both houses by the
American congress, 154, 155; mcet-
ing of (December 1765), 167; debate
in the lords, tone of, 167-169; violent
in the commons, 169, 170; the roral.
speech to, tells of trouble (1766), 174;

debate in the commons, 175; Pitt's
great speech, 175-178; remarks of
Conway, 178; Grenville's abuse of
America, 178-180; Pitt's reply, 180-
184; debate in housc of lords, 188–
194; in house of commons, 194-
196 ; affirms the right to tax Amer.
ica, 196, 197; the modern tory par-
ty, 196, 197; the ministry defeat-
ed on the stamp-act enforcement,
203; stamp-act repealed, 206, 207;
insists on supremacy over the colonies,
208; debate, repcal carried, 210; op-
position to ministerial course as to
America, 253 ; determines on an Amer.
ican army and revenue, 256, 257.

The last parliament to legislate for
America meets (1768), iii. 256 ;
Grenville advocates reform, 316;
Burke jeers at it, 316; in session,
322; feeling of, toward the colonies,
322, 323; rejects American petitions,
324; resolves to enforce its authori-
ty, 326 ; debate in the commons, 331-
335; refuses to repeal the revenue
act, 315; debite in, 364, 365; at-
tempts to conci iate America, 385,
386; Boston port bill in house of
lords, 475; bill to take away char-
ter from Massachusetts, effect of,
477 ; this, with four other penal bills,
carried, 477–481; infatuation of, iv.
5; two acts of, against Massachusetts,
11; dissolution of, 67 ; venality of
(1774), 90, 91 ; opinions of lords and
commons, 92; the ministry confident,
93; commerce to be interdicted, 99;
debate in the lords, 104, 103; minis-
terial victory in, 103 ; unrelenting,
114 ; declares díassachusetts in rebel-
lion, 117; debate in the commons,
118, 119; debate in the lords, 119,
120; joint address of, 120; New Eng-
land to be excluded from the fisheries,
126, 132; concessions to the French,
126 ; dislikes Lord North's plan, 128;
prohibits fisheries of New England
and restricts trade of southern colo-
nies, 261; in session (October 1775),
281; dehates in commons on the ad-
dress to the king, 282, 283; votes to
crush the rebellion, 282, 283; in the
lords the vote equally strong, 283,
284 ; weak ministry at date, 256.

Prohibits trade and confiscates all
American ships (1776), iv, 337; sends
British commissioners to America, in-
structions of, 341; debates, 342; de-
bate in the commons on treaties with
Brunswick and Hesse, 356, 357; de
bate in the lords, 357; in session, F.

53-56 ; how supreme power obtained, Virginia (1788), vi. 426; vigorously
262; change in votes, 282 ; growing supports the federal constitution,
discontent in, with the war against 427-495.
the United States, 496 ; urges giving Penn, John, succeeds Caswell in con-
up the war, 524; movement and de-

gress, iv, 260.
bate on discontinuing the war, 530, Penn, Richard, takes second petition to
031 ; action on making peace with the the king of England, iv, 239; arrives
United States, 548, 549; debate in, in England in August, 269, 270;
on the treaty of peace, vi. 39–42; de shabby treatment of, by the ministry,
bate in the lords, 47, 48.

270; at the bar of the house, 284.
Parris, Samuel, minister of Danvers, Penn, Thomas, with Richard, proprie-

Massachusetts, ii. 58, 59; active in tary of counties on the Delaware, ii.
the witchcraft delusion, 61-63; driven 397; views of (1754), 411; agent for
out of the town, 66.

Pennsylvania, iii. 70; interview with
Parry, Lieutenant - Colonel, killed on Grenville, opposes taxing the colo-
Long Island, v. 32.

nies, 70, 71.
Parsons, S. H., and others, of Connecti- Penn, William, buys East New Jersey,

cut, plan for taking Ticonderoga, iv. i. 551; letter to the people of Penn-
181, 182 ; brigadier general, in battle, sylvania, 553, 554; sails for America,
v. 30; his brigade runs away, 44, 45 ; 656; early life and position, 556–558;
travels in the West, vi, 283.

in the Tower, 558; tried and acquitted,
Partridge, agent of New York mer 558; in Newgate, 558; travels on the
chants, ii. 244.

continent, 560; contrast with John
Paterson, William, of New Jersey, in Locke, 561; organizes his government,

the federal convention, vi. 214; leads 563, 564; disputes with Lord Balti.
resistance against the larger states, more, 564, 565; treaties with the In-
232; pleads for equality of states in dians, 567, 568; returns to England,
one supreme council, 234; a strong farewell letter, 509, 570; work at
federalist, 269 ; on the ratification of home, 571, 572; political sentiments
the constitution, 273.

of, 596, 697; message to the people, ii.
Paulding, John, one of André's captors, 24; arrested and cleared, 27, 28;

v. 433, 434; congress votes an annu goes to Pennsylvania, 28; troubles
ity to, 438.

of, 30; returns to England, 30; plan
Paulet, Earl, in parliament, on question of, for union of the colonies, 74, 75.
of taxing America, ii. 194.

Pennsylvania, charter of, i. 552, 553;
Pauw, M., buys Staten Island, New Markham, Penn's agent, 154; no
York, i. 498.

monopolies, 554; free-traders, 555;
Pavonia, New Jersey, Pauw's colony, i. Philadelphia laid out, 565; first leg-
498, 499.

islation and constitution, 565, 666;
Pawtucket See Penacook.

witchcraft trials in, 568 ; growth of,
Paxton, Charles, marshal of admiralty 568, 569; boundary with Maryland,

court, Boston, sent to England, iii. 570; legislation, 571, 572; slavery

231 ; aids Townshend's schemes, 238. in, 572, 573; after the revolution of
Payson, minister of Chelsea, Massachu 1688, ii. 24-31; the schism of Keith
setts, and his exploit, iv. 164.

in, 25; Fletcher, royal governor of,
Peirce, William, of Salem, Massachu 25, 26; democracy in, 28; new con-
setts (1630), i. 236.

stitution, disputes, progress, 29-31;
Pelham, Henry, prime minister (1742), evades the call for quotas, 77, 78;

ii. 295 ; administration of, 295--388; feeling in, as to prohibition of manu-
death of, 408.

factures, 257; volunteer militia of,
Pelham, Thomas Hollis. See Newcastle. 304, 305 ; condition of (1764), 397,
Peltrie, Madame de la, ii. 140.

398; affairs in, 445; schemes against,
Pemaquid, destroyed by the Indians, ii. 446; condition of (1757), 460, 461;
179.

strife of, with the proprietaries and
Penacook, Indians, ii. 91; onslaught of, board of trade, 529, 530; reproved
178, 179.

for disobedience, 557.
Pendleton, Edmund, on the stamp-act, Spirit of the assembly of, iii. 91;

iii. 199; at the head of Virginia com favors a congress, 146; approves
mittee of safety, iv. 205; president course of Virginia, 348; elccts dele-
of the Virginia convention, 414; gates to the continental congress
president of the state convention of (1774), iv. 28; course of, 109, 110;

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spirit and activity of (1775), 178; the 258; agent of Massachusetts in Eng
assembly of, rejects overtures of the land, 281; death of, and character,
governor, 178, 179; strife in the leg 346.
islature, 231; committee of safety, Petition to the king by congress, iv. 75,
252; the Quakers hold back, 264 ; 76; second petition, 238.
after the king's proclamation still Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded, i.
clings to loyalty, 273; action of the 565; congress of governors at, ii.
legislature, 273; still holds on to al 460; spirit of (1773), iii. 446; re.
legiance, 336; also to proprietary solves not to let in the tea, 446; ac-
government, 339; raises troops, is tion on the tea ship's arrival, 457;
sucs money, 339; delegates in con increased commerce of, 467; meeting
gress refuse to vote the suspension of of citizens of, iv. 12; counsels mod.
royal anthority, 314; proprietary eration, 13, 14; active in the good
government in, overthrown, 420; ir cause (1775), 178; second continental
resolution of the assembly, 421, 422; congress in, 190; town-meeting in
delays, 423; the counties frame a (1776), resolves to form a new govern.
government in place of the proprietary ment, 420; protests against action,
government, 432, 433; question of 421 ; committee of inspection ap-
internal reform and religious liberty, pointed, 422; declaration of inde-
433; assents to the declaration of in-

pendence by congress, 442; how re-
dependence, 433, 434; the conven ceived, v. 3 ; first celebration in, of
tion forms a new constitution, v. 67; independence, 154, 155; is entered
provisions of, 67, 68, 116; council by the British (1777), 181; English
remonstrates against Washington's commissioners arrive in, 271 ; evacu-
winter quarters, 213; urges the re ated by Clinton (1778), 273 ; chagrin
covery of Philadelphia, 215; slavery, of loyalists in, 273, 274; patriotism
and gradual emancipation, 412, 413; of the women of, 445 ; riot in, ri. 97;
views as to public debt, vi. 33; adopts Washington's hopeful words to (1789),
Washington's advice (1783), 91; pro 470.
poses a protective system, 138; laws Philip, son of Massasoit, haughty and
of, as to paper money, 171; the jealous, i. 386, 387; is hurried into
legislature receives and debates on rebellion, 387, 388; a fugitive, 388;
the new constitution of the United assaults and destroys Lancaster, Mas-
States, 382; a state convention called, sachusetts, 391 ; death of, 393.
383; long and warm debates, 384- Philip II. of Spain, i. 54; suggests con-
388; the constitution ratified, 390; quest and colonization of Florida, 55.
moderation of the minority, 465; a Phillips, General, with Burgoyne, v. 158,
second federal convention refused, 187; in Virginia, 506; death of, 506.
466.

Phillips, William, one of Boston's mer-
Penry, John, Welsh non-conformist, chants, iii. 369, 454; with Adams,
hanged, i. 192, 193.

Bowdoin, and others, negatived as a
Pensacola, Florida, occupied by the councillor, iv. 14.
Spaniards, ii. 138.

Phips, Sir William, governor of Massa-
Peoria, Lake, ii. 164.

chusetts, i, 57; share of, in witch-
Pepperell, William, in command against craft prosecutions, 61, 62; complains
Louisburg, ii. 306.

as to salary, 68; captures Port Royal,
Pequods, Indians, enemies of the Narra Nova Scotia, 181; before Quebec, re-

gansetts, i. 266; war with the whites, turns to Boston, 181.
266; extermination of, 267, 268; lo- Piankeshaws and Weas, Indians, join
cality of, ii. 91.

the English against the French, ü.
Percy, Lord, in command of troops to 34-36.

relieve the British who had gone to Pickens, Andrew, of South Carolina, ir.
Concord, 163, 164; basty retreat of, 256 ; colonel, routs British ravagers,
164; rage and brutality of the troops, v. 158, 187; unable to act, 378; at
164, 165 ; mcan and slanderous battle of the Cowpens, 482, 483; pro-
words, 172; stays away from battle moted, 485; with Lee routs the loyal-
of Bunker Hill, 218; starts to attack ists or tories (1781), 491; takes Au-
Dorchester lleights, but stops short, gusta, Georgia, 600; in battle at
327, 328; with Cornwallis on Long Eutaw Springs, 503.
Island, v. 29.

Pickering, Timothy, of Salem, Massa-
Peter, Hugh, goes to Massachusetts, i. chusetts, iv. 25; appointed quarter

master general, v. 446; advises cx Lexington, Massachusetts (1775), iv.
clusion of slavery in the new states, 155 ; in the retreat to Boston loses
vi. 81; letter to R. King against his horse and pistols, 163; mortally
slavery in the West, 132.

wounded at Bunker Hill, 227, 228.
Picqua, a town of the Miami Indians, Pitkin, William, governor of Connecti.

council at, ii. 364 ; attacked and de cut (1766), discreet and patriotic, iii.
stroyed by the French, 371, 372.

221.
Picquet, Abbé F., missionary to the In- Pitt, William, ii. 295 ; “the great com-
dians (1748), ii. 337.

moner," in parliament, 408, 409;
Pigot, General, leads British troops at opposes treaty with Russia, 442; re-
Breed's liill, iv, 218, 225.

moved from office, 442 ; prime minis-
Pijart, C., Jesuit missionary (1640) ter, 457; George III. promises bis
among the Indians, ii. 14).

support, 458; policy of, toward the
Pilgrims, name adopted by Puritans in colonies, 458; rejects the stamp-tax

Amsterdam and Leyden, i. 200; not for America, 458; George III, dis-
liking Holland, look toward America, cards him, 458; is the people's choice
201 ; offers to the London Company, for minister, 468–471; genius and
with professions as to creed and con power of, 472, 473 ; supports Freder.
duct, 201, 202; favored by Sandys, ic of Prussia, 432; invites the colo-
204 ; form partnership to emigrate, nies to raise troops against Canada
204; reach Cape Cod, 205 ; compact,

and the French colonies, 482, 483;
and landing, 206–209; Indians friend. watches American events, 490, 492;
ly, 210; progress and success, 212; plan of, sor 1759, 498, 499; holds on
frame of government, 213; views as to Canada, 528; on colonial rights,
to toleration, 213, 214; memory of 530; rebukes contraband trade, 531;
the Pilgrims, 214.

not in favor with Georyc III., 535;
Pinckney, Charles, iv. 89; president of negotiates peace with France, 637,

the provincial congress, South Caro 538; refuses to abandon Frederic of
lina (1775), 106; activity of, 180; Prussia, 541; plans of, 512; pro-
submits to Cornwallis, v. 393; in poses war against Spain, 543 ; is out-
congress (1786), vi. 186; address of, voted, and resigns, 544; accepts a
to the legislature of New Jersey, 187, peerage and pension, 545; opposes
188 ; proposes a grand convention, peace with France (1762), 562; asked
189, 190 ; presents a plan of consti to join the ministry (1763), iii. 53;
tution in the federal convention, 215, speech of, against Grenville's mcas.
217, 219, 224, 229 ; on property quali ures, 64, 65; a-ked to form a minis-
fications, 296; on slave representa try, 124; declines, 126; “Pitt and
tion, 301; on fugitive slave law, 309, Liberty," in Boston, 135; applied to
310; on rebellion, slave-trade, etc., by the ministers, 174; great speech
311, 318, 319, 323; on mode of elect of, 175–178; noble continuation, 180-
ing the president of the United States, 184 ; offers made to, no result, 185,
etc., 327, 343 ; proposals of, as to the 186; opinion on John Adams's Essay,
judiciary, 318, 319 ; in the South Caro 186; shares in debate, 187, 195;
lina assembly, 414, 415.

speech of, and skill, 200; debate on
Pinckney, Charles Coresworth, at Fort repeal of stamp-act, 204-206 ; mo-

Johnson, on James Island, South tion of, to abandon claim of right,
Carolina, iv. 258 ; in the federal con 208; forms an administration, 223;
vention, vi. 225, 226; active in the becomes earl of Chatham, 226. See
work, 259, 264, 266 ; on property

Chatham.
qualifications, 271; on slave repre- Pitt, William, the younger, as a boy, iii.
sentation, 309 ; on the militia, slavc 206; on his father's speech (1775), iv.
trade, etc, 313, 318, 323 ; debate in 105; refuses to serve against the
South Carolina assembly, 415; dc Americans, 186; kind words as tc, by
fend; the federal constitution against Washington, 298; speech against the
Lowndes, 415-418.

American war, v. 496; proposes re-
Pinckney, Thomas, governor of South form in parliament, 5-14; chancellor

Carolina (1788), vi. 419; president of the excl:equer (1782), 646; elo-
of the state convention on the federal quent speech in debate, vi. 41, 42;
constitution, 419, 420.

declines office, 42; proposes parlia-
Pineda. See De Pineda.

mentary reform, 52; interview of,
Pitcairn, Major, lcads the attack on with John Adams, 149, 150; ungen.

erous and unjust course of, toward agrecs to a peace, 151; assassinated
the United States, 151.

355.
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, named after Pontleroy, travels of, in America, iii.

William Pitt, ii. 495 ; relieved in Pon. 75.
tiac's war, iii. 49; important point Poor, General, at Princeton, p. 107;
for western emigration and Indian with General Gates, 187.
trade (1774), iv. 83; seized by Lord Popham, George, president of second
Dunmore, governor of Virginia, 83, colony of Virginia, i. 85, 90.
86.

Popham, Sir John. See Gorges.
Ployden, Sir E., patent of, for New Al- Population of the twelve oldest colonies
bion, on Delaware Bay, i. 509.

in 1688, i. 602; of the thirteen colo-
Plymouth, council at, England, for plant nies (1754), ii. 389, 390; of the thir.

ing and governing New England, es teen colonies, twenty years later
tablished by King James I., i. 215; (1774), iv. 52.
admiral and lieutenant-general of, ap- Port Royal, Nova Scotia. See Annapolis.
pointed, 216; monopoly of, in the Port Royal, South Carolina, i. 432.
fisheries condemned by parliament, Port bill, Boston, in parliament, iii.
217; sell lands to settlers at Salem, 471-475; how received in America,
222; charter of, given up, 275; royal iv. 5, 10.
commissioners at, 377; revolution in, Porter, John, Quaker, expelled from the
on accession of William and Mary, Virginia assembly, i. 448.
600; the old government restored, Porterfield, Colonel, of Virginia, v. 385;
600.

mortally wounded near Camden, South
Plymouth, Massachusetts, the pilgrims Carolina, 387.

land at (December, 1620), i. 209; suf- Portland, duke of, in the cabinet, v.
ferings and slow progress, 209, 210; 545, 546; with Fox and Lord North,
Indians friendly to, 210, 211; prog-

vi. 44.
ress and success, 212; tolerant spirit Portland, Maine, people of, attack a
of, 213, 214; people of, establish a king's ship in the harbor (1775), iv.
trading-house at Windsor, Connecti 183; Gage's mean and barbarous re-
cut (1633), 264; sufferings in King
Philip's war, 388-393 ; joins other Portsmouth, one of the oldest towns in
towns in seconding Boston, iii. 421; New Hampshire, i. 217; people of,
Watson, a mandamus councillor in, seize powder and arms, iv. 94, 95. See
forced to resign, iv. 50.

New Hampshire.
Pocahontas, daughter of Powhatan, i. Portugal, voyages of Portuguese, i. 14;

93; rescues John Smith, 94; becomes mercantile system of, ii. 87, 88; over-
a Christian, 106; marries John Rolfe, tures made by, to Franklin, vi. 56.
107; goes to England and is made Pory, John, speaker in the first colonial

much of, 108; death of, 108, 109. assembly of Virginia, i. 112; travels
Point Levi, on the St. Lawrence, ii. 505, of, in Carolina, 410.
507.

Post-office, first introduced into British
Point Pleasant, iv. 86; great victory of America by Andros (1692), ii. 18, 23;
the Virginians ncar, 87.

stabl by parliament (1710), 84;
Pokanokets, Indians, i. 386, 387; driven Franklin deputy postmaster-general,

from Mount Hope, 388; war against, iii. 391; is turned out of office, 464 ;
vigorously conducted, 392, 393; of Franklin appointed by congress (1775)
the Algonkin family, ii. 91.

to organize post-office, iv. 246; B.
Pomeroy, Seth, in expedition against Church director of, 246.

Louisburg (1745), ii. 307, 308; ap- Potemkin, Prince, v. 348, 349, 353,
pointed brigadier-general, iv. 121; at 354.
the battle of Bunker Hill, 220; elect- Potomac river, company of adventurers
ed by congress brigadier-general, re explore, i. 160; company for improv.
tires on account of age, 234.

ing navigation of, vi. 128.
Ponce de Leon, discovers Florida, i. 22, Pott, Francis and John, position and
23; death of, 24.

course of, in Virginia, i. 136, 138.
Pontiac, chief of the Ottawas, ii. 524; Pottawatomies, Indians, worshippers of

origin of war with the whites, iji. 41, the sun, ii. 93, 151; attack the Iro-
42; forts taken, garrisons murdered, quois, 184; share of, in Pontiac's war,
43-47; ravages of, 46; price set on iii. 42, 44.
head of, 49; French intervention, 49; | Poutrincourt, settlement of, at Port

venge, 263.

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