Shipping and Shipbroking: A Guide to All Branches of Shipbroking and Ship Management

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Sir J. Pitman & sons, Limited, 1924 - Insurance, Marine - 519 pages
 

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Page 414 - And so we the assurers are contented, and do hereby promise and bind ourselves each one for his own part, our heirs, executors, and goods to the assured, their executors, administrators, and assigns for the true performance of the premises, confessing ourselves paid the consideration due unto us for this assurance by the assured at and after the rate of IN WITNESS WHEREOF we the assurers have subscribed our names and sums assured in (London).
Page 188 - And it is further agreed that if the ship hereby insured shall come into collision with any other ship or vessel and the assured shall in consequence thereof become liable to pay and shall pay by way of damages to any other person or persons any sum or sums in respect of such collision, the underwriters will pay the assured such proportion of three-fourths of such sum or sums so paid as their respective subscriptions hereto bear to the value of the ship hereby insured...
Page 412 - The rules of the common law including the law merchant, save in so far as they are inconsistent with the express provisions of this Act, shall continue to apply to contracts of marine insurance.
Page 281 - ... the master or other person signing the same, notwithstanding that such goods or some part thereof may not have been so shipped, unless such holder of the bill of lading shall have had actual notice at the time of receiving the same that the goods had not been in fact laden on board: Provided, that the master or other person so signing may exonerate himself in respect of such misrepresentation by showing that it was caused without any default on his part, and wholly by the fraud of the shipper...
Page 414 - Com, fish, salt, fruit, flour, and seed are warranted free from average, unless general, or the ship be stranded — sugar, tobacco, hemp, flax, hides and skins are warranted free from average, under five pounds per cent, and all other goods, also the ship and freight, are warranted free from average, under three pounds per cent unless general, or the ship be stranded.
Page 410 - Where, under the same policy, a partial loss which has not been repaired or otherwise made good, is followed by a total loss, the assured can only recover in respect of the total loss: Provided that nothing in this section shall affect the liability of the insurer under the suing and labouring clause.
Page 183 - Maritime perils" means the perils consequent on, or incidental to, the navigation of the sea,. that is to say, perils of the seas, fire, war perils, pirates, rovers, thieves, captures, seizures, restraints, and detainments of princes and peoples, jettisons, barratry, and any other perils, either of the like kind or which may be designated by the policy.
Page 281 - Every bill of lading in the hands of a consignee or endorsee for valuable consideration, representing goods to have been shipped on board a vessel, shall be conclusive evidence of such shipment as against the master or other person signing the same, notwithstanding that such goods or some part thereof may not have been so shipped...
Page 260 - The carrier shall be bound, before and at the beginning of the voyage, to exercise due diligence to — a) Make the ship seaworthy...
Page 420 - Warranted free of capture, seizure, arrest, restraint, or detainment, and the consequences thereof or of any attempt thereat (piracy excepted) , and also from all consequences of hostilities or warlike operations whether before or after declaration of war.

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