The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, with Documents, Narratives ... Etc, Volume 4

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G.P. Putnam, 1865 - United States
 

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p 349 and 350 letter by union boat guy in march 1862 about coming to wwashington nc and finding pro union sentiment

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Page 236 - Resolved, That the United States ought to cooperate with any State which may adopt a gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such State pecuniary aid, to be used by such State in its discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences, public and private, produced by such change of system.
Page 228 - I, , do solemnly swear that I will support, protect, and defend the Constitution and Government of the United States against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign ; and that I will bear true faith, allegiance, and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution, or law of any State, convention, or legislature to the contrary notwithstanding...
Page 189 - You do solemnly swear that you will support the Constitution of the United States, and see that there are no grounds floating upon the coffee at all times.' ' Yes, massa, I do dat,' he replied ; ' I allers settle him in de coffee-pot.
Page 36 - In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. ABRAHAM LINCOLN. By the President: WILLIAM H SEWARD, Secretary of State.
Page 238 - initiation" because, in my judgment, gradual and not sudden emancipation is better for all. In the mere financial or pecuniary view any member of Congress with the census...
Page 240 - States north of such part will then say, ' the Union for which we have struggled being already gone, we now choose to go with the southern section.
Page 139 - Federal forces the appointment of Commissioners to agree upon terms of capitulation of the forces and fort under my command, and in that view suggest an armistice until 12 o'clock to-day. I am, sir, very respectfully, Your ob't se'v't, SB BUCKNER, Brig. Gen. CSA To Brigadier-General US GRANT, Com'ding US Forces, Near Fort Donelson.
Page 140 - Without a murmur this was borne, prepared at all times to receive an attack, and, with continuous skirmishing by day, resulting ultimately in forcing the enemy to surrender 'without conditions. " The victory achieved is not only great in the effect it will have in breaking down rebellion, but has secured the greatest number of prisoners of war ever taken in any battle on this continent.
Page 257 - They lay along the battery's side. Below the smoking cannon; Brave hearts from Severn and from Clyde, And from the banks of Shannon. They sang of love, and not of fame ; Forgot was Britain's glory; Each heart recalled a different name, But all sang "Annie Laurie.
Page 139 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.

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