Life and Public Services of Hon. James G. Blaine, the Illustrious American Orator, Diplomat and Statesman

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Publishers' Union, 1893 - Bookbinding - 686 pages
 

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Page 138 - ... to provide and maintain a navy, and to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces...
Page 590 - No might nor greatness in mortality Can censure 'scape ; back-wounding calumny The whitest virtue strikes : What king so strong Can tie the gall up in the slanderous tongue ! But who comes here ? Enter Escalus, Provost, Bawd, and Officers.
Page 139 - The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite ; and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed. This power ought to be coextensive with all the possible combinations of such circumstances ; and ought to be under the direction of the same councils which are appointed to preside over the common defence.
Page 453 - The United States of America and the Emperor of China, cordially recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance, and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens and subjects respectively from the one country to the other for the purposes of curiosity, of trade, or as permanent residents.
Page 313 - We recognize the equality of all men before the law, and hold that it is the duty of Government, in its dealings with the people to mete out equal and exact justice to all, of whatever nativity, race, color, or persuasion, religious or political.
Page 155 - The Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed. We should not be in haste to determine that radical and extreme measures, which may reach the loyal as well as the disloyal, are indispensable.
Page 166 - A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen, but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of selfpreservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation. To lose our country by a scrupulous adherence to written law, would be to lose the law itself, with life, liberty, property and all those who are enjoying them with us ; thus absurdly sacrificing the end to the means.
Page 516 - States — one who knows enough to know that the national debt must be paid through the prosperity of this people; one who knows enough to know that all the financial theories in the world cannot redeem a single dollar; one who knows enough to know that all the money must be made, not by law, but by labor...
Page 280 - That the best policy to diminish our burden of debt is to so improve our credit that capitalists will seek to loan us money at lower rates of interest than we now pay, and must continue to pay, so long as repudiation, partial or total, open or covert, is threatened or suspected.
Page 574 - With the requisite change of scene the same words would aptly portray the early days of Garfield. The poverty of the frontier, where all are engaged in a common struggle and where a common sympathy and hearty co-operation lighten the burdens of each, is a very different poverty, different in kind, different in influence and effect from that conscious and humiliating indigence which is every day forced to contrast itself with neighboring wealth on which it feels a sense of grinding dependence. The...

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