Omitted Chapters of the History of England from the Death of Charles I to the Battle of Dunbar, Volume 1

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Page 302 - That ye may eat the flesh of kings, and the flesh of captains, and the flesh of mighty men, and the flesh of horses, and of them that sit on them, and the flesh of all men, both free and bond, both small and great.
Page 113 - He went forth in that state and equipage as the like hath hardly been seen ; himself in a coach with six gallant Flanders mares, whitish grey ; divers coaches accompanying him ; and very many great Officers of the Army ; his Lifeguard consisting of eighty gallant men, the meanest whereof a Commander or Esquire, in stately habit ; — with trumpets sounding, almost to the shaking of Charing Cross, had it been now standing. Of his Lifeguard many are Colonels ; and believe me, it's such a guard as is...
Page 137 - I do not believe, neither do I hear, that any officer escaped with his life, save only one Lieutenant, who, I hear, going to the Enemy said, That he was the only man that escaped of all the Garrison. The Enemy upon this were filled with much terror. And truly I believe this bitterness will save much effusion of blood, through the goodness of God.
Page 335 - ... labouring to make a perfect interposition between us and Berwick. And, having in this posture a great advantage through his better knowledge of the country, he effected it by sending a considerable party to the strait pass at Copperspath, where ten men to hinder are better than forty to make their way.
Page 233 - If the meaning of these words, finding against the direction of the Court in matter of law, be, that if the Judge having heard the evidence given in court, (for he knows no other...
Page 358 - I perceive, your forces are not in a capacity for present release. Wherefore, whatever becomes of us, it will be well for you to get what forces you can together ; and the South to help what they can.
Page 42 - I Do declare and promise, That I will be true and faithful to the Commonwealth of England, as it is now Established, without a King or House of Lords.
Page 101 - It is not impossible, therefore, that some of the regulations of this famous act may have proceeded from national animosity. They are as wise, however, as if they had all been dictated by the most deliberate wisdom.
Page 351 - We are upon an Engagement very difficult. The Enemy hath blocked up our way at the Pass at Copperspath, through which we cannot get without almost a miracle. He lieth so upon the Hills that we know not how to come that way without great difficulty; and our lying here daily consumeth our men, who fall sick beyond imagination.
Page 102 - As defence, however, is of much more importance than opulence, the act of navigation is, perhaps, the wisest of all the commercial regulations of England.

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