Page images
PDF
EPUB

curre] after the men left the army are not included in these figures.

7. The system of recruitment established by the Bureau, under the laws of Congress, if permanently adopted, (with such improvement as experience may suggest,) will be capable of maintaining the numerical strength and improving the character of the army in time of peace, or of promptly and economically rendering available the National forces to any required extent in time of war.

THE UNITED STATES ARMY DURING THE GREAT CIVIL WAR

OF 1861-65.

The following statement shows the number of men furnished by each State:

STATES.

Men furnished

Aggregate No. under Act of Aggregate No. of men furnish'd April 15, 1861, of men furnish'd under all calls, for 75,000 militia under all calls. reduced to the 3 for 3 months.

years' standard.

771 779

782 3,736 3,147 2,402 13,906

3,123 20,175

775

Maine....
New Hampshire.
Vermont.
Massachusetts.
Rhode Island.
Connecticut ...
New York.
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware.
Maryland
West Virginia.
District of Columbia.
Ohio
Indiana.
Illinois.
Michigan
Wisconson
Minnesota..
Iowa
Missouri..
Kentucky
Kansas..
Tennessee.
Arkansas
North Carolina.
California.
Nevada
Oregon
Washington Ter'ty.
Nebraska..
Colorado
Dakota.
New Mexico,

900
4,720
12,357
4,686
4,820

781
817
930

968
10,501

71.745 34,605 35, 246 151,785

23,711 57,270 464,156

79,511 366,326 19,651 49,731 32,003 16,872 317,133 195, 147 258,217 90,119 96,118 25,034 75,860 108,773 78,540 20,097 12,077

56,595 30,827 29,052 123,844 17,878 50,514 381,696

55,785 267,558

10, 303 40,692 27,653 11,506 237,976 152, 283 212, 694 80,865 78,985 19,676 68,182 86,192 70,348 18,654 12,077

650

7,451

216
617

895
1,279
1,762

181 2,895

7,451

216 581 895

380 1,762

181 1,011

1,510

Tatal...

93,826

2,688,523

2,154, 311

HISTORY OF THE FLAG.

BY A DISTINGUISHED HISTORIAN.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

MEN, in the aggregate, demand something besides abstract ideas and principles. Hence the desire for symbols—something visible to the eye and that appeals to the senses. Every nation has a flag that represents the country-every army a common banner, which, to the soldier, stands for that army. It speaks to him in the din of battle, cheers him in the long and tedious march, and pleads with him on the disastrous retreat.

Standards were originally carried on a pole or lance. It matters little what they may be, for the symbol is the same.

In ancient times the Hebrew tribes had each its own standard—that of Ephraim, for instance, was a steer; of Benjamin, a wolf. Among the Greeks, the Athenians had an owl, and the Thebans a sphynx. The standard of Romulus was a bundle of hay tied to a pole, afterwards a human hand, and finally an eagle.

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Eagles were at first made of wood, then of silver, with thunderbolts of gold. Under Cæsar they were all gold, without thunderbolts, and were carried on a long pike. The Germans formerly fastened a streamer to a lance, which the duke carried in front of the army. Russia and Austria adopted the double headed eagle. The ancient national flag of England, all know, was the banner of St. George, a white field with a red cross. This was at first used in the Colonies, but several changes were afterwards made.

Of course, when they separated from the mother country, it was necessary to have a distinct flag of their own, and the Continental Congress appointed Dr. Franklin, Mr. Lynch, and Mr. Harrison, a committee to take the subject into consideration. They repaired to the American army, a little over 9,000 strong, then assembled at Cambridge, and after due consideration, adopted one composed of seven white and seven red stripes, with the red and white crosses of St. George and St. Andrew, conjoined on a blue field in the corner, and named it “The Great Union Flag." The crosses of St. George and St. Andrew were retained to show the willingness of the colonies to return to their allegiance to the British crown, if their rights were secured. This flag was first hoisted on the first day of January, 1776. In the meantime, the various colonies had adopted distinctive badges,

It

he

[ocr errors]

so that the different bodies of troops, that flocked to the army, had each its own banner. In Connecticut, each regiment had its own peculiar standard, on which were represented the arms of the colony, with the motto, “Qui transtulit sustinet”—(he who transplanted us will sustain us.) The one that Putnam gave to the breeze on Prospect Hill on the 18th of July, 1775, was a red flag, with this motto on one side, and on the other, the words inscribed, “An appeal to Heaven.” That of the floating batteries was a white ground with the same “ Appeal to Heaven” upon it. It is supposed that at Bunker Hill our troops carried a red flag, with a pine tree on a white field in the corner. The first flag in South Carolina was blue, with a crescent in the corner, and received its first baptism under Moultrie. In 1776, Col. Gadsen presented to Congress a flag to be used by the navy, which consisted of a rattle-enake on a yellow ground, with thirteen rattles, and coiled to strike. The motto was, “Don't tread on me.” “The

.' Great Union Flag,” as described above, without the crosses, and sometimes with the rattle-snake and motto, “Don't tread on me," was used as a naval flag, and called the “Continental Flag."

As the war progressed, different regiments and corps adopted peculiar flags, by which they were designated. The troops which Patrick Henry raised

« PreviousContinue »