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(143) Palmer letter: New Republic, Jan, 15, 1916, v. 5: 268. AP2.N624, V. 5.

(144) Presidential term : Outlook, Jan. 19, 1916, v. 112:118. AP2.08, v. 112.

(145) Harvey, George. Wilson and a second term: North American Review, Feb., 1916, v. 203:161-170. AP2.N7, v. 203.

(146) McPherson, John B. The one-term pledge: Protectionist, Feb., 1916, v. 27: 659-662. HF1750.P6, v. 27.

(147) Wilson, Woodrow Wilson on one term: Protectionist, Feb., 1916, V. 27: 687–689. HF1750.P8, v. 27.

Letter to Mr. Palmer.

(148) Second terms and treaties: North American Review, Mar., 1916, v. 203 : 467-470. AP2.N7, v. 203.

SPEECHES, ETC., IN CONGRESS, AS PRINTED IN THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD

[Sixty-second Congress, second session, volume 48]

(149) Borah, William E. The presidential term. Senate, Aug. 20, 1912, pt. 11:11355-11366.

(150) Clapp, Moses E. The presidential term. Senate, Aug. 21, 1912, pt. 11:11461-11463.

(151) Driscoll, Michael E. The third-term menace. House, Aug. 24, 1912. Appendix : 909-912.

(152) “The first assault and repulse of third termism-a chapter of halfforgotten history.” Editorial from Louisville Courier-Journal, April 23, 1912, pt. 6:5304_5306.

(153) Floyd, John C. Terms of President, Vice President, Senators, and Representatives. House, June 1, 1912, pt. 8: 7521-7523.

(154) Henry, Robert L. Terms of President, Vice President, Senators, and Representatives. House, June 1, 1912, pt. 8: 7517-7519.

(155) McCall, Samuel W. Speech in House, Feb. 6, 1912, opposing a third term, pt. 2:1790–1792.

(156) U. S. Congress. House, Debate . . . June 1, 1912, on (H. Res. 204) proposing an amendment to the Constitution relative to the terms of President, Vice President, etc., pt. 8: 7509_7516. (157)

Senate. Debate . . . Aug. 21, 1912, on the (S. J. Res. 78) proposing amendment in the Constitution relating to presidential term, pt. 11: 11439-11443, 11458-11466.

(158) Williams, John S.: Speech in the Senate, Aug. 19, 1912, on the presidential term, pt. 11:11439–11441.

Recommends term of four years and re-eligible for one additional term only. (159) Works, John D.: Speech

Mar. 11, 1912, on S. J. Res. 78, proposing an amendment to the Constitution that will fix the term of office of the President at six years instead of four, etc., pt. 4:3132–3133.

(160) Cummins, Albert B.: The presidential term. Senate, Aug. 19, 1912, pt. 11:11255-11264.

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[Sixty-second Congress, third session, volume 49]

(161) The beginning of the movement for a single six-year term for the President of the United States. Newspaper editorials, pt. 2: 1649-1650.

Introduced into the Record by Mr. Works, Jan. 17, 1913.

(162) Cummins, Albert B. The presidential term. Speech in the Senate, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, 1913, on (S. J. Res. 78), proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, pt. 3 : 2363–2366; 2401-2407.

(163) Hamilton, Alexander. [Article relative to the reelection of the President.) pt. 3: 2412–2413.

(164) Lindbergh, C. A. Election of President and Vice President. House, Feb. 6, 1913, on the bill (H. R. 28499) making appropriations to provide for the expenses of the District of Columbia, etc. Appendix : 46-47. Opposed to the single six-year term.

(165) National business league of America. Memorial in support of a single six-year term for President, with newspaper editorials, pt. 2: 1649–1650.

(166) The presidential term. Newspaper editorials bearing upon the question of one term for the President of the United States, pt. 2: 1947–1948.

Introduced into the Record by Mr. Works, Jan. 24, 1913.
(167) U. S. Congress. (Senate.) The presidential term. Debate.

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Jan. 30-Feb. 1, 1913, on S. J. Res. 78, pt. 3: 2258–2281 ; 2344-2366; 2401-2420.

(168) Works, John D.: The presidential term. Senate, Dec. 9 and 10, 1912, pt. 1: 294-299.

Speech occasioned by the consideration in the Senate of the joint res. (S. J. Res. 78) proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the U. S. by changing the term from four to six years with no reelection.

[Sixty-fourth Congress, second session, volume 54]

(169) Coleman, Julius A. Amendment to elect President and Vice President by the people direct for one term of six years. Appendix: 295–298.

Introduced into the Record by Mr. Humphrey, Feb. 7, 1916.

(170) United States Congress. (Senate.) Term of office of President and Vice President. Debate in the Senate, Jan. 8, 1917, on S. J. Res. 177, proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, providing for the election of President and Vice President without the intervention of the Electoral College

pt. 1: 989-992.

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CLAIM FOR THE DEATH OF EDWIN TUCKER

MESSAGE

TROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE CONCERNING A CLAIM AGAINST THE UNITED STATES PRESENTED BY GREAT BRITAIN FOR EDWIN TUCKER, A BRITISH SUBJECT KILLED BY A UNITED STATES ARMY AMBULANCE IN COLON, PANAMA, ON OR ABOUT DECEMBER 6, 1924

DECEMBER 17, 1927.-Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations

and ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State concerning a claim against the United States, presented by the Government of Great Britain, for compensation to the relatives of Edwin Tucker, a British subject who was killed by a United States Army ambulance in Colon, Panama, on or about December 6, 1924. The report requests that the recommendation as indicated therein be adopted and that the Congress authorize the appropriation of the sum necessary to compensate the claimants in this case.

I recommend that in order to effect a settlement of the claim in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of State, the Congress, as an act of grace and without reference to the legal liability of the United States in the premises, authorize an appropriation of $2,500.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 17, 1927.

The PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to submit, with a view to its transmission to the Congress, the following report and recommendation respecting the claim presented by the Government of Great Britain for compensation to the relatives of Edwin Tucker, a British subject who was killed by a United States Army ambulance in Colon, Panama, on or about December 6, 1924.

The essential facts concerning the death of Edwin Tucker are admitted and are substantially as follows:

The chargé d'affaires ad interim of Great Britain at this capital, in a note, No. 1108, dated December 31, 1925, informed this department that on December 6, 1924, an Army ambulance from France Field, Canal Zone, operated by Private Wilbert L. Schwartzfiger, was engaged in conveying an injured man from the military barracks at France Field to the Canal Zone Hospital in Colon city, ran into the Lee Chong Building at Bolivar and Ninth Streets, Colon, striking and killing Edwin Tucker, who at the time of the accident occurred was standing outside the drug store which is in that building. A copy of a medical certificate issued by the physicians of Colon Hospital testifying to the cause of Edwin Tucker's death was inclosed. This report indicates that the death resulted from the injury received when Mr. Tucker was struck by the ambulance.

It was added that at the time of his death Edwin Tucker assisted in maintaining and supporting his mother, Mrs. Eliza Tucker, and his son, George Tucker, 11 years old, both of whom resided in St. James Parish in the Island of Jamaica. A brother of the deceased, acting on behalf of himself and the dependent relatives above mentioned, endeavored without success to obtain compensation from the military authorities of the Canal Zone. Accordingly, the chargé d'affaires expressed the hope that the competent authorities of this Government would see their way in the interests of justice to accord suitable compensation to the mother and son of the deceased, who have been deprived, through no fault of their own, of their principal means of support.

The matter was brought to the attention of the Secretary of War, and after some correspondence the Acting Secretary of War informed me on July 17, 1926, that the facts in the case as set forth in the note dated December 31, 1925, from the chargé d'affaires ad interim of Great Britain, were substantially correct. He added, however, that G. C. M. Ambulance No. 73192, which was property of the United States, was carrying an emergency patient injured at France Field, Canal Zone, from the post hospital at that station to the hospital at Colon. The ambulance was proceeding along Bolivar Street at a speed of about 25 miles an hour; it was on the left side of the street, and that when at a point near Ninth Street, in maneuvering to avoid a collision, it skidded to the curb on the right side of the street, overturned and killed Edwin Tucker, a colored civilian, who was at that time on the sidewalk.

A board of officers, convened at France Field for the purpose of investigating the accident, reported in part as follows:

That Edwin Tucker (colored), a resident of Colon, Republic of Panama, was accidently killed by United States Ambulance No. 73192.

That the death of Mr. Edwin Tucker was due to no fault or negligence of his That the driver of United States Ambulance No. 73192 (Private Schwartzfiger) was exceeding the speed limit when this accident occurred.

That an extenuating crcumstance did exist when Private Schwartzfiger was speeding, namely: He was carrying a seriously injured patient to the Colon

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