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ings to his crew. While adjusting the stabilizer of his plane, which is the custom just previous to making a landing, a sharp blow was felt on the right wing of the plane, and immediately on opening the throttle it was ascertained that the right wing had struck some object, which at the time was believed to have been a stump.

The pilot immediately landed the plane and found that the object struck was a Dominican native, who apparently was on horseback, as a horse was seen running from the scene of the accident, and the day following a saddle and equipment were found near where the accident occurred. The body was brought to the city by airplane and prepared for burial at the base hospital of the marine brigade. Local civil authorities were notified and viewed the body, a permit for burial was obtained, and the body buried at 2 p. m., October 3, 1923. All expenses for the burial were borne by the United States Government. Prior to burial photographs of the body were taken and copies furnished the local civil officials, together with the personal effects of the deceased. All possible efforts were made by both the local civil authorities and the military authorities to determine the identity of the deceased, who afterwards appeared to be Juan Soriano.

Capt. Harold D. Campbell, the pilot of the airplane, voluntarily appeared before Señor Luis Bonithy, judge of public instruction, and related the details of the accident. Also a court of inquiry was ordered by the military authorities to inquire into all the circumstances of the accident. The court expressed the opinion that "the accident was unavoidable and was not due to the fault or negligence or inefficiency of any person or persons in the naval service or connected therewith.” The matter was referred to the Navy Department for investigation and in a letter to the State Department on March 18, 1924, the Acting Secretary of the Navy confirmed the existence of the essential facts which gave rise to the claim as set forth above, and suggested that, if the claimants would agree to accept the sum of $2,000 as a fair and reasonable compensation, recommendation be made to the Congress for the enactment of necessary legislation.

From the record it appears that the deceased was between 35 and 38 years of age, was a butcher on a small scale, having two small shops in the district in which he lived. His average profits, according to his widow, were about $20 gold a week, his debts at the time of his death are stated to have been about $400, and he left no cash estate. He was survived by a widow and five children, one of whom has since died. The oldest child is a boy about 12 years of age, who is capable of earning about 20 cents a day when he works. The youngest, at the time of the father's death, was 1 month old.

A summary of the essential facts taken from the reports on file in the case being embodied in this communication, it is deemed unnecessary to accompany it with correspondence in the case, but all or any part of that correspondence will, of course, be furnished should the Congress so desire.

The Secretary of State acquiesces in the recommendation of the Acting Secretary of the Navy, and has the honor, therefore, to request the President to recommend to the Congress, as an act of grace and without regard to the question of legal liability, the authorization of an appropriation in the sum of $2,000, in payment to the widow and children for the death of Juan Soriano, & Dominican

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subject, which resulted from the landing of an airplane belonging to the United States Marine Corps at Guerra, Dominican Republic.

It will be noted from the inclosed communication from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, to whom the matter was referred, that the proposed action is not inconsistent with the financial program of the Government. Respectfully submitted.

CHARLES E. HUGHES. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 30, 1924.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, April 11, 1924. MY DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I have letter of April 4, 1924, from the Department of State, signed by the Undersecretary, inclosing a copy of a proposed report to the President recommending that Congress be requested to authorize an appropriation in the sum of $2,000 in payment of a claim for the death on October 2, 1923, at Guerra, Dominican Republic, of Juan Soriano, a Dominican subject, who was killed by the fall of an airplane belonging to the United States Marine Corps, and asking whether the proposed action is in harmony with the financial policy of the President.

It gives me pleasure to advise you that the proposed request for legislation authorizing an appropriation of $2,000 for the purpose stated is not in conflict with the President's financial program. Sincerely yours,

HERBERT M. LORD, Director. The SECRETARY OF STATE.

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STUDY AND INVESTIGATION OF BATTLE FIELDS IN THE

UNITED STATES

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

TRANSMITTING

PURSUANT TO LAW, A REPORT BY THE SECRETARY OF WAR RELATIVE TO THE STUDY AND INVESTIGATION OF BATTLE FIELDS IN THE UNITED STATES FOR COMMEMORATIVE PURPOSES, TOGETHER WITH HIS RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FURTHER OPERATIONS

DECEMBER 12, 1927.- Read; referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and

ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

In compliance with section 2 of the act of Congress to provide for the study and investigation of battle fields in the United States for commemorative purposes, approved June 11, 1926, I transmit herewith a report by the Secretary of War of the progress made under the said act, together with his recommendations for further operations.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE, December 12, 1927.

DECEMBER 6, 1927 The PRESIDENT,

The White House. DEAR MR. PRESIDENT: Section 2 of the act of Congress approved June 11, 1926, entitled: "An act to provide for the study and investigation of battle fields in the United States for commemorative purposes," provides that the Secretary of War shall annually submit through the President to Congress a detailed report of progress made under the said act, together with his recommendations for further operations.

The sum of $15,000 was appropriated in the act making appropriations for the military and nonmilitary activities of the War Department for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1928, for defraying the cost of studies, surveys, and field investigations authorized in the above-mentioned act. Upon the request of this department for an opinion as to whether this appropriation may properly be charged with mileage of officers of the Army when traveling on duty in connection with the object for which the appropriation was made, the Comptroller General of the United States replied that this appropriation is not available and may not be used for such purposes and it has, therefore, not been possible to carry forward the surveys and field investigations. Studies are being made by the Army War College of the battle fields in which Congress has indicated some interest and which have not been heretofore investigated for commemoration, in accordance with the classification in House Report No. 1071, Sixty-ninth Congress, and these studies will be continued as they may be required.

In order that the surveys and field investigations may be conducted during the remainder of this fiscal year and also during the next fiscal year a supplemental estimate was submitted to extend the availability of the current appropriation to June 30, 1929, and to make it available for mileage of officers and traveling expenses of civilian employees. House of Representatives Document No. 74, Seventieth Congress, first session, shows that this estimate was presented to Congress and favorable action thereon will meet the situation to June 30, 1929.

So that the cost of mileage and traveling expenses may be permanently included within the costs of investigations and surveys of battle fields, a draft of a bill having this purpose in view has been submitted to the committees of Congress, with request that it be introduced and enacted into law.

It is recommended that the proposed bill be enacted into law and that the appropriation be continued and made available for expenditure during the fiscal year 1929. Respectfully,

DWIGHT F. DAVIS,

Secretary of War. O

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SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE OF APPROPRIATION UNDER THE LEGISLATIVE ESTABLISHMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1928 IN THE SUM OF $5,500, TOGETHER WITH A LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET

DECEMBER 13, 1927.-Read; referred to the Committee on Appropriations and

ordered to be printed

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 13, 1927. The PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Congress, and without revision, a supplemental estimate of appropriation under the legislative establishment for the fiscal year 1928 in the sum of $5,500. Respectfully,

CALVIN COOLIDGE.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, December 13, 1927. Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith for your consideration a supplemental estimate of appropriation pertaining to the legislative establishment under the Architect of the Capitol, as follows:

House office building, 1928
To enable the Architect of the Capitol to remodel the room formerly

occupied by the House restaurant, to provide rooms for the Committee
on Agriculture and the Joint Committee on Taxation, and to remodel
the space formerly occupied and used as a gymnasium to provide
rooms for the legislative counsel, in accordance with the instructions
of the House Office Building Commission, and for the necessary labor
and material and all incidental expenses incident to such remodeling
and changes.--

$5,500

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