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Appropriation, “Acquisition of lands for protection of watersheds of navigable streams, 1926"; balance obligated but unexpended at close of fiscal year 1926 (see report of National Forest Reservation Commission for fiscal year 1926, S. Doc. No. 171, 69th Cong., 2d sess.)---

$664, 984. 28 Expenditures during fiscal year 1927

298, 788.00 Balance obligated but unexpended July 1, 1927-..

366, 196. 28 Appropriation, “Acquisition of lands for protection of watersheds of navigable streams, 1927"

1,000,000.00 Expenditures during fiscal year 1927

366, 041. 67 Balance obligated but unexpended July 1, 1927..

633, 958. 33 Appropriation, "Acquisition of lands for protection of watersheds of navigable streams”; unexpended balance at close of fiscal year 1926, available July 1, 1926 (see report of National Forest Reservation Commission for fiscal year 1926, S. Doc. No. 171, 69th Cong., 2d sess.)

112, 027. 13 Expenditures during fiscal year 1927.

922. 85 Unexpended balance available for further disbursement July 1, 1927.---

111, 104. 28 Total unexpended balance of all appropriations July 1, 1927. 1, 111, 258. 89 This unexpended balance is encumbered in the form of

executed contracts.
Amounts disbursed during the fiscal year 1927 from the 4 available

appropriations for “Acquisition of lands for protection of water-
sheds of navigable streams," as shown above:
Appropriation for 1925.

451, 978. 79 Appropriation for 1926.

298, 788.00 Appropriation for 1927

366, 041, 67 Appropriation without year..

922. 85 Total disbursements from all appropriations during the fiscal year 1927.

1, 117, 781. 31 Analysis of expenditures during fiscal year 1927

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FUTURE WORK

The general policy in the conduct of purchase work which it is planned to follow in the immediate future is to endeavor to secure consolidation of lands upon existing national-forest purchase units. Table 6 shows the stage of consolidation within these units. Although there is much local demand for an expansion of the purchase program through the extablishment of national forests in the pine belt of the Southern States and elsewhere, it does not seem desirable to authorize any material broadening of the field of purchase until more ample appropriations with assured continuity are available for carrying forward such work in an economic manner. In 1921 the Secretary of Agriculture was requested to examine lands within the southern pine region and make tentative locations for national-forest units. This has been done and a number of areas have been selected in the pine region of the Southern States which seem to offer conditions suitable for the establishment of national forests. There are similar tentative locations in the mountains of Oklahoma and Kentucky, which, on account of their influence upon stream flow and flood control, seem to warrant prior consideration whenever the appropriation situation seems to justify the location of new purchase units.

In the Lake States a like policy looking primarily toward consolidation will be followed. The Tawas purchase unit, in the State of Michigan, and the Superior in Minnesota, still contain large areas of privately owned lands which are available for purchase. The acquisition of these lands will promote more economical administration and will round out forest working circles. Two other areas in the upper peninsula of Michigan, the Marquette area, and the Mackinac area south of Munising have been examined and will be ready for early consideration by the commission. In Wisconsin, where there is no national forest, the enabling act, allowing purchase by the Federal Government of lands for this purpose, has been modified, broadening its provisions so as to allow, subject to the approval of designated State officials, the acquisition, within that State, of an area not exceeding 500,000 acres. Prior to this amendment the area acquired could not exceed 100,000 acres. Areas have been located within both the sandy-soil pine belt of the northwestern portion of the State and within the hardwood lands which offer suitable conditions for the location of national forests whenever adequate appropriations seem to justify the establishment of such new units.

Although at the present time money is not available to finance an extensive program of acquiring lands for the production of timber either in the southern pine belt or in the lake region, there is within certain portions of the southern pine belt to-day an important field for the establishment of small national forest units primarily for demonstrational purposes. Within this region many owners of pinetimber lands are attempting to place their holdings upon a sustained yield basis-looking toward successive cuts of timber from the same land. The primary object in the management of such forests would be to develop and then to demonstrate, for the benefit of these private owners, the more profitable methods of handling timberlands in this region. Since these units would be not extensive in area, their establishment would require only a limited amount of money and would

not materially interfere with carrying forward the plans for consolidation within the national forests already established in the White Mountains, in the Appalachians, and in Arkansas.

The appropriation of $1,000,000, which has been made for several years, is inadequate to maintain the purchase work upon a plane necessitated by the forest situation in the United States. The report of the select committee of the Senate which investigated the subject of forest devastation urged an appropriation of $3,000,000 a year for the purchase of lands for national forests. This commission has for several years recommended an appropriation of $2,000,000 a year, and again urges that an annual appropriation of not less than this amount be made for the conduct of this work. Not only is it uneconomical to handle it upon a lower basis, but the forest situation, the rapid exhaustion of the supply of mature merchantable timber, especially in the Eastern States, demands that the work of acquiring lands for public forests as a source of future timber supply and as a means of demonstrating to the private owner practical methods of management, shall be carried forward at an accelerated rate.

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CLAIM FOR THE DEATH OF JUAN SARIANO

MESSAGE

TROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

TRANSMITTING

REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE RESPECTING A CLAIM FOR THE DEATH OF JUAN SARIANO, A SUBJECT OF THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, SUBMITTED TO THE SIXTY-NINTH CONGRESS AND RECOMMENDING ANEW THE AUTHORIZATION OF AN APPROPRIATION FOR ITS PAYMENT BY THE PRESENT CONGRESS, TOGETHER WITH A LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU OF THE BUDGET

DECEMBER 12, 1927.—Read, referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations,

and ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report by the Secretary of State requesting the submission anew to the present Congress of the matter of a claim against the United States for the death on October 2, 1923, at Guerra, Dominican Republic, of Juan Soriano, a Dominican subject, who was killed by the landing of an airplane belonging to the United States Marine Corps, which formed the subject of a report made by the Secretary of State to me in March, 1926, ond my message to the Congress dated March 22, 1926, which comprise Senate Document No. 84, Sixty-ninth Congress, first session, copies of which are furnished for the convenient information of the Congress.

I renew my recommendation originally made, that in order to effect a settlement of this claim, the Congress, as an act of grace, and without reference to the legal liability of the United States in the premises, authorize an appropriation in the sum of $2,000, and I bring the matter anew to the attention of the present Congress in the hope that the action recommended may receive favorable consideration.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 12, 1927.

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