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(6) Fort Sam Houston, Tex.
(6) Fort Bliss, Tex.
(7) Fort Douglas, Utah.
(8) Naval radio station, Astoria, Oreg.
(9) Presidio of San Francisco, Calif.

(10) Fort Snelling, Minn.
(6) 8-10 kilowatt transmitters located at-

(1) New Orleans naval radio station.
(2) Fort Sill, Okla.
(3) Fort D. A. Russell, Wyo.
(4) Rockwell Field, Calif.
(5) Fort Lincoln, N. Dak.
(6) Camp Pike, Ark.
(7) Fort Wingate, N. Mex.

(8) Fort William H. Harrison, Mont. (c) 5-5 kilowatt transmitters located at

(1) Washington Navy Yard.
(2) West Point, N. Y.
(3) Fort Williams, Me.
(4) Scott Field, Mo.

(5) Whipple Barracks, Ariz. Assuming average costs, excluding unusually favorable or unfavorable conditions, the initial cost of such a system would approximate: 10–50 kilowatts, at $250,000.

$2, 500, 000 8-10 kilowatts, at $75,000.

600, 000 5-5 kilowatts, at $40,000.

200, 000

3, 300, 000 In order to transmit the desired broadcast to each station it would be necessary to cut in leased wires of the special balanced type used for broadcast transmission. These lines are rented at an annual rental of $50 per mile. Where such lines already exist but would require installation in some of the more isolated localities, approximately 9,500 miles of leased wire would be required if the most direct routes could be covered. It is considered probable, however, that at least 2,500 miles would be added

by utilizing wires now in existence rather than installing new ones. This total of 12,000 miles covers the major maintenance expenditure of $600,000 annually. This expenditure it is impracticable to obviate at the present stage of the art, as the stations would be too far apart to allow of a sufficiently strong signal to be received at the next station. Also, for rebroadcasting the necessary number of channels could not be obtained in the present broadcast band without paralyzing existing broadcasting programs.

The power for these 23 stations aggregating 605 kilowatts output requires 2,420 kilowatts from commercial lines, or a total (at 4 cents per kilowatt-hour) would cost $96.80 per hour of broadcasting, as broadcast transmitters are at the most 25 per cent efficient. With an average session of 5 hours daily 100 days per year, the annual power bill would approximate $48,400.

Tubes used have a life expectancy of 1,000 hours. The 23 transmitters would require a total of 6,000 tubes at an average cost of $300. Each year would see the replacement of one-half the number of tubes at a cost of $90,000.

Each station would require the services of two qualified engineers, or a total of 50 (discounting supervising personnel). The lowest possible salary for such men would be $2,400 per year, or a total of $120,000 per year for the system.

An annual depreciation of 10 per cent must be expected for radio stations, and will in some cases exceed that figure. At 10 per cent the annual depreciation which covers upkeep and appearance of buildings and towers and replacement of faulty or failing equipment would be approximately $330,000.

Thus to supply a complete system your committee estimates an initial expenditure of $3,300,000. For upkeep and maintenance the annual cost would approximate $1,188,400.

S. C. HOOPER, Commander United States Navy.

J. O. MAUBORGNE, Lieutenant Colonel United States Army.

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PARLATORIA DATE SCALE IN CALIFORNIA AND

ARIZONA

COMMUNICATION

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

A SUPPLEMENTAL ESTIMATE OF APPROPRIATION FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AMOUNTING TO $25,000 TO ENABLE THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE TO MEET AN EMERGENCY CAUSED BY THE SPREAD OF THE PARLATORIA DATE SCALE IN CALIFORNIA AND ARIZONA

DECEMBER 12, 1927.—Read; referred to the Committee on Appropriations,

and ordered to be printed

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, December 12, 1927. The PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the consideration of Congress a supplemental estimate of appropriation amounting to $25,000 for the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1928 to remain available until June 30, 1929, to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to meet an emergency caused by the spread of the parlatoria date scale in California and Arizona

The details of this estimate, the necessity therefor, and the reasons for its transmission at this time are set forth in the letter of the Director of the Bureau of the Budget transmitted herewith, with whose comments and observations thereon I concur. Respectfully,

CALVIN COOLIDGE.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, December 12, 1927. Sır: I have the honor to submit herewith for your consideration a supplemental estimate of appropriation amounting to $25,000 for the Department of Agriculture for the fiscal year 1928, to remain available until June 30, 1929, to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to meet an emergency caused by the spread of the parlatoria date scale in California and Arizona. Eradication of date scale 1928–29.

$25, 000 Four new outbreaks of the parlatoria date scale have recently been discovered-two in the State of Arizona and two in the State of California. One of the outbreaks in California has already spread to adjacent plantings. The fact that these new outbreaks were not detected until the scale had made considerable spread demonstrates that as a basis for control a thorough inspection should be made of all date plantings in the States of Arizona, California, and Texas. The methods used in eradicating this scale have proven that complete eradication is possible, after infestation is discovered. It has been demonstrated that profitable production of dates can not be maintained in the presence of the parlatoria scale and unless the infestations are promptly eradicated it is the opinion of the department that the industry must necessarily fail. The funds requested in this supplemental estimate will be needed to employ entomologists to make a complete survey of all date plantings in order that eradication methods may be applied wherever the pest is located.

This estimate is required to meet an unforeseen contingency which has arisen since the transmission of the Budgets for the fiscal years 1928 and 1929 and its approval is recommended. Very respectfully,

H. M. LORD,

Director of the Bureau of the Budget. The PRESIDENT.

Supplement estimate of appropriation required for the service of the fiscal year ending

June 30, 1928, by the Department of Agriculture
Federal Horticultural Board: For an additional amount to enable the

Secretary of Agriculture to meet the emergency caused by the
existence of the parlatoria date scale in California, Arizona, or any
other State, including the same objects specified under this head in the
agricultural appropriation act, fiscal year 1928, $25,000, to remain
available until June 30, 1929 (U. S. C. p. 56, secs. 511, 512, p. 95,
secs. 111-114; pp. 98-101, secs. 141-167; act Jan. 18, 1927, vol. 44,
pp. 985, 986, 993, 994, 1000–1002).

$25, 000 Amount appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1928..

19, 000

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